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HOLMES HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION - 1963 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't. Coach Bertsch, Taylor, Mgr. Marsh, 
Murphy, Coach Draud. Second Row: Lovett, Schaeffler, Ferguson, Orphan, 
Arnsperger, Yeager. Third Row: Haney, Sargent, Curry, Ryan, Blackburn. 



Official Organ of tfie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



August 1963 



Lafayette High School Track Team—K. H. S. A. A. Co-Champion 1963 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ritchey, Morell, Morrow, Searcy, Moore, Merris, Marcum, Cox, 
Reynolds. Second Row: Mgr. Monroe, White, Vickery, Mayes, Borg, Cooper, Wright, McAllis- 
ter, Ringo, Sherrod. 



St. Xavier High School Track Team—K. H. S. A. A. Co-Champion 1963 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Kelly, Co-Capt. Sauer, Capt. Vetter, Co-Capt. Eigel, Roberts. Sec- 
ond Row: Coach Denny, Graf, Conti, Hagan, Gahm. Third Row: Coach Heitzman, Buschemey- 
er, Meyer, Lyons. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1963 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville Kentucky, July 10, 1963 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Sir: 

We have examined the Statements of Receipts and Dis- 
bnrsements of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
for the year ended June 30. 1963. Cash in Banks, Savines 
Accounts and Bond Investments were verified by direct com- 
munication with depositors. Buildings and equipment are 
reflected at estimated values without appraisal by us. 

In onr opinion the accompanying statements present fairly 
the financial position of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association at June 30. 1963, and the results of its operations 
for the year then ended, subject to the estimated value of build- 
ings and equipment, in conformity with generally accepted 
accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that 
of the preceding year. 

Respectfully submitted 

JOHNSON & LUSK 

Certified Public Accountants 

1191 East Broadway 

Louisville 4, Kentucky 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1962, TO JUNE 30, 1963 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in checking Account July 1, 1962 _.$ 44,422.58 

Annual Dues: 426 @ $3.00 $ 1,278.00 

Officials' Dues : 

Football: 454 $3.00 1,362.00 

Basketball: 1320 @ $3.00 3,960.00 

Reciprocity Officials : 

Football: 54 (tf $1.00 54.00 

Basketball: 37 «i $1.00 37.00 

Officials' Fines: 38 (fi $5.00 190.00 

Redeposits (Bad Checks made good) 36.00 

Advertising in Magazine 1,490.00 

Sale of Publications 244.10 

Sale of Bonds 2,100.00 

Ticket Sales-Annual Meeting 507.00 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 1,326.00 
Interest Received from 1st Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 400.00 

Interest Received from Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 400.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 125,647.75 

Refunds 488.31 

Receipts-State Baseball Tournament 933.50 

Football Playoffs: 

A & AA Ticket Sales 6,974.00 

AAA Profit 1,726.62 

A & AA Program Profit 280.36 

AAA Football Game State Tax 135.70 

A & AA Program State Tax 8.94 

Receipts — State Track Meet 803.00 $150,382.28 

$194,804.86 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 4,085.20 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $12,000) 8,751.52 

Expense — Commissioner's Office 519.33 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $10,000) 7,689.39 

Travel Expense — Ass't Commissioner 831.32 

Clerical Help 6,003.09 

Janitor Service 937.16 

Postage 1,934.93 

Office Supplies 702.95 

Janitor Supplies 34.75 

Purchase of New Equipment 600.00 

Insurance 647.19 

Equipment Repairs & Service Contracts : 684!82 

Building Repairs 267.05 

Utilities 971.57 

Telephone and Telegraph 1,384.73 



Fidelity Bonds 

Printing 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches Charity Ass'n 

Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S. 

Purchase of National Federation Publications 

Delegates to National Federation Meetings 

National Federation Dues 

Girls Division — NSGWS 

Rental on Films 

Audit 

Bad Checks 

Miscellaneous Disbursements 

Meals — Annual Banquet 

Speaker — Annual Banquet 

Taxes and Withholdings: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld $ 4,848.70 

Social Security 1,319.74 

City Income Tax Withheld 468.19 

State Income Tax Withheld 689.42 

Hospitalization Withheld 311.00 

Retirement Fund Withheld 900.00 

State Sales and Use Tax 501.19 



44.20 

2,701.55 

500.00 

300.00 

2,388.15 

3,445.79 

125.20 

300.00 

321.00 

85.00 

45.00 

37.50 

2,301.81 

153.45 



Transfer of Funds: 

To Savings Accounts 10,000.00 

To U. S. Savings Bonds 17,500.00 



Insurance Subsidy 

Magazine : 

Printing and Engravings 4,832.10 

Mailing 175.00 



27,500.00 
14,826.75 



Officials' Division : 

Honorariums and Expenses — Clinics 1,183.04 

Printing and Miscellaneous Expense 64.60 

Schools for Officials 1,507.54 

Expenses — Regional Basketball 

Clinics 178.61 

Officials' Emblems 605.64 

Swimming : 

State Committee Expense 

Trophies and Medals (State Meets) 

Officials (State Meets) 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 
(State Meets) 



302.81 
648.50 
285.48 



Golf: 



Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 896.75 

Trophies and Awards 905.00 

Miscellaneous Expenses 144.98 



Tennis ; 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 

Trophies and Balls 

Expenses — Tournament Managers— 



938.45 

1,777.70 

165.12 



Track: 



Regional Expense 497.91 

Trophies and Medals 1,816.99 

State Committee Expense 634.15 

Officials 782.46 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 8,033.68 

New Equipment 172.84 

State Clinic 123.40 



Baseball : 

Refunds on District Tournament 

Deficits 

Trophies 

Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 

Baseballs (State Tournament) 

Transportation (State Tournament) 

Meals (State Tournament) 

Ticket Sellers and Takers 

(State Tournament) 

Lodging (State Tournament) 

Scorer (State Tournament) 

Umpires (State Tournament) 

Expenses — Ass't Manager 

(State Tournament) 



198.18 

86.52 

685.80 

1,350.00 



60.00 
720.00 

25.00 
260.00 



62.00 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



AUGUST, 1963 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 1 



STATE WINNERS IN GIRLS* TENNIS 



Pablished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hish School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexin^on, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexingrton, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville: 
Preston Holland (1961-65); Murray: Don R. Rawlinss (1961-65), 
Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



^lom in* 



c, 



ommtssionei s 



Offi 



ice 



New Football Film 

THIS IS FOOTBALL is the newest ad- 
dition to the Official Sports Film Service 
family of official rules films. THIS IS 
FOOTBALL was produced under the sanc- 
tion and supervision of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associa- 
tions and allied groups. The film is the 
twenty-second in the series of official films 
and the ninth football film. Wheaties Sports 
Federation and Wilson Sporting Goods Co. 
are again serving as co-sponsors of the film 
as they have for the previous twenty-one 
films. 

The theme of the film is centered a- 
round the four S's of football. They are 
science, speed, skill and safety. Demonstra- 
tions cover a panorama of basic rules that 
will aid the official, coach, player and fan in 
better understanding and appreciating the 
intricacies of football. Play situations are 
used to establish standards that can further 
aid the official in those difficult judgment 
decisions. 

The K.H.S.A.A. has secured two prints 
of the film and has placed them on loan 
with the Film Library at the University of 
Kentucky. The films are available for use in 
schools and by officials' organizations upon 
request. Booking dates for the film may be 
secured from the Film Library, Bureau of 
School Service, University of Kentucky, 
Lexington. 



Football Clinics 

The 1963 clinics for football officials and 
coaches will be conducted by Athletic Di- 
rector Edgpr McNabb, Assistant Principal 
of the Beechwood High School, South Fort 
Mitchell. Mr. McNabb has been the K.H.S. 
A.A. representative on the National Feder- 
ation Football Committee for several years. 




(Left to Right) Bemadette Gephart and Nancy Evans, state 
doubles championship team ; Pam Sullivan of Waggener, state 
singles champion; state tournament manager Margaret Sheegog. 

The dates and sites of the clinics are as fol- 
lows: August 12, Kentucky Power Com- 
pany, Ashland, 7:30 P.M.; August 13, Pres- 
tonsburg High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 
14, Bell County High School, Pineville, 7:30 
P.M.; August 19, Bowling Green High 
School, 7:30 P.M.; August 20, Mayfield 
High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 21, Hender- 
son High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 26, 
Newport High School, 7:30 P.M.; August 
27, University High School, Lexington, 7:30 
P.M.; August 28, Kentucky Hotel, Louis- 
ville, 7:30 P.M. 

Football Districts and Regions 

The football districts and regions for 
1963, determined by the K.H.S.A.A. Board 
of Control, are as follows: 

Class AAA 
REGION I 

Atherton, Bishop David, Central, De- 
Sales, duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, Shaw- 
nee, St. Xavier, Trinity 

REGION II 
District 1 — 

Butler, Fairdale, Pleasure Ridge Park, 
Southern, Valley, Western 
District 2— 

Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Seneca, 
Waggener, Westport 

Class AA 
REGION I 
District 1 — 

Attucks, Bowling Green, Caldwell Coun- 
ty, Christian County, Franklin-Simpson, 
Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Paducah, Warren 
County 
District 2— 

Daviess County, Henderson, Henderson 
County, Madisonville, Owensboro, Owens- 
boro Catholic. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Page Three 



REGION II 
District 1 — 

Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Franklin 
County, Kentucky Military Institute, LaRue 
County, North Hardin, Oldham County, St. 
Joseph, Shelby County 
District 2— 

Bourbon County, Bryan Station, Clark 
County, Danville, Dunbar (Lexington), 
Harrison County, Henry Clay, Lafayette, 
Madison, Madison Central, Scott County, 
Somerset 

REGION III 

Ashland, Boone County, Boyd County, 
Campbell County, Dixie Heights, Fleming 
County, Highlands, Holmes, Louisa, McKell, 
Newport, Newport Catholic, Rowan County, 
Russell, Wurtland 

REGION IV 
District 1 — 

Bell County, Corbin, Cumberland, 
Evarts, Hall, Hazel Green, Knox Central, 
Middlesboro 
District 2— 

Belfry, Hazard, Jenkins, Leslie County, 
M. C. Napier, Prestonsburg, Wheelwright, 
Whitesburg 

Class A 
REGION I 
District 1 — 

Fort Campbell, Fulton, Lincoln (Pa- 
ducah), Murray, Trigg County 
District 2— 

Crittenden County, Douglass (Hender- 
son), High Street, Lincoln (Franklin), 
Morganfield, Providence, Russellville, Stur- 
gis 

REGION II 
District 1 — 

Aquinas, Bardstown, C a m p b e 1 Isville, 
Glasgow, Greensburg, Lebanon, Louisville 
Country Day, Metcalfe County, Old Ken- 
tucky Home, Shepherdsville, Springfield, 
Tompkinsville 
District 2— 

Anderson, Bate, Boyle County, Emi- 
nence, Frankfort, Georgetown, Harrods- 
burg. Jessamine County, Lancaster, Lincoln 
Institute, Mercer County, Shelbyville, Stan- 
ford, Versailles 

REGION III 
District 1 — 

Carrollton, DuBois, Irvine, Millersburg 
Military Institute, Mt. Sterling, Nicholas 
County, Paris, Owingsville 
District 2— 

Beeohwood, Bellevue, Catlettsburg, Day- 
ton, Elkhom City, Fleming-Neon, Lloyd, 
Ludlow, Morgan County, Paintsville, Pike- 
ville, Raceland 



REGION IV 
District 1 — 

Barbourville, Lily, London, Lynn Camp, 
Pineville, Williamsburg 
District 2— 

Buckhorn, Dike Combs, East Main, Har- 
lan, Loyall, Wallins, West Main 



XAVIER'S CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 




(Left to Right) BUI Spencer, state champion donbles team mem- 
ber; Brother Cajetan, St. Xavier Coach; Roger Klein, tourna- 
ment manager; and Mickey Schad, doubles team member and 
state singles champion. 

Registration of Officials 

Football and basketball officials pre- 
viously registered have received their re- 
newal application cards for the 1963-64 
school year. One hundred thirty-six officials 
failed to file their 1962-63 reports on or be- 
fore the deadline set by the Board of Con- 
trol for the submitting of reports, and it 
was necessary to impose fines on these of- 
ficials who failed to comply with Associa- 
tion rules. It is an Association requirement 
that each registered official attend the 
clinic in the sport in which he is registered. 
Eleven football officials and eighty-nine 
basketball officials were suspended in 1962- 
63 for failure to attend clinics. 
New Officers 

On July 27, 1963, the Board Oif Control 
was to elect a new President and Vice- 
President. The magazine deadline was prior 
to this date. Writeups of the new officers 
will appear in the September issue of the 
ATHLETE. 

Medical Clinics 
The Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
and the Kentucky State Medical Association will 
again co-operate in conducting a series of medical 
clinics for school administrators and coaches. Three 
clinics will be held in 1963, two of them following 
football clinics for officials and coaches and one 
following a basketball clinic. The Hardin County 
Medical Society, working with the School Health 
Committee of the State Medical Association, will 
also sponsor an Athletic Injuries Clinic. The dates 
and sites of the clinics are as follows: Elizabeth- 
town High School, August 13; Newport High School, 
August 26; Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, August 28; ' 
Paducah Tilghman High School, September 30. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 
June 5-6, 1963 



Lone Oak (4) 




Lone Oak (2) 


Lone Oak (0) 










Hazard (1) 


Madison Central (0) 










Owensboro (3) 


Holmes (3) 






(10) 




Madison Central 


Flaget (4) 


Holmes- 




2) 


Champion 


Bowling Green ( 




Flaget (3) 






Holmes (5) 










McDowell (0) 






Holmes (5) 









Thirtieth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Bellevue High School, Bellevne, May 13-14, 1963 

SINGLES 



Schad-St. Xavier 
Trunnell-Owensboro 
Cost-Hopkinsville 
Wade-Lafayette 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Schad 
6-0; 6-2 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Schad 
6-0; 6-0 




Wade 
6-4; 6-1 


FINALS 


Simms 
6-1; 6-1 


Schad 


Bolton 

6-4; 3-6; 11-9 


6-1; 6-1 


Hamilton-Trinity 


Spencer 
6-4; 8-6 


Bolton-Henry Clay 


Simms 
6-1; 6-0 


Emery-Valley 


Gauspohl 
6-0; 6-0 




Sunms-Bellevue 


Gauspohl 
6-1; 6-0 


GauspoM-Bellevue 




Dunn-Valley 


Barnes 
6-3; 6-2 


Jenkins-Owensboro 
Bames-Hopkinsville 
Beverly- Ashland 


Spencer 
6-3; 6-1 


Weber 
6-2; 6-2 




Weber-Trinity 
Shier-University 
Spencer-St. Xavier 




Spencer 
6-2; 6-0 













Schad 
6-2; 6-0 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Page Five 



St. Xavier 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

St. Xavier 
6-0; 6-0 


DOUBLES 

SKMI- 
FINALS 


FINALS 


Warren County 
Henry Clay 


Trinity 

6-0; 7-9; 16-14 




St. Xavier 
6-4; 6-0 








Trinity 
Lafayette 


Lafayette 
6-2; 6-3 






St. Xavier 
6-3; 6-2 














Valley 


Bellevue 
6-3; 6-3 


Bellevue 
6-2; 6-0 








Owensboro 






Bellevue 











Fourth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament For Girls 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 10-11, 1963 

SINGLES 



Sullivan-Waggener 


Sullivan 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Sullivan 
6-0 : 6-1 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Sullivan 
6-1; 6-0 


FINALS 

Sullivan 
7-5; 6-2 




Bye 






Miller 
(forfeit) 






Gutgsell 

8-6 ; 8-10 ; 10-8 




Hagedom -Highlands 




Gutgsell 








Gutzs ell- Presentation 


Steilberg 
4-6; 6-2; 6-2 




Bye 






Squires 
6-3: 6-2 






Nolan 
6-1: 6-1 




S qui res- Greeiisbuxg 




Nolan 








Nolan-Sacred Heart 


Bastin 
7-5 ; 6-2 




Bye 




Ballman 
6-1 : 6-1 








Schrecker- Henderson 


- Steilberg 
6-1; 6-1 










Speagle 
6-3 ; 7-B 








Speagle-Lloyd 


Bastin 
6-3; 6-3 










Steilberg 








Steilberg-Presentation 


Bastin 
7-5; 6-4 










Bastin 


6-2; 6-2 


Bastin-Owensboro 




Bye 




Wells 

3-6; 6-3; 6-0 








Welfc-Murray 


Rodman 
6-1 ; 6-3 




Johnson-Waggener 




Rodman 








Rodman-Franklin Co. 


Casey 
8-6: 7-6 










VanHoy 
6-2; 6-3 








Sedgwick-Fairdale 


Casey 
6-4; 6-4 




VanHoy-LaRue 




Casey 








Casey-Henderson 






Bye 






- Dean 




Dean-Fairdale 


Gaitner 

6-2; 3-6: 6-2 










- Gaitner 

6-2: 5-7; 6-4 








Gaitner-Bowling Green 






Evans-Murray 




Thoney-Bellevue 


Thoney 








Bye 





Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

Attention, coaches and recreation lead- 
ers! They are playing a fascinating game in 
Canada called "Lawn Bowls" or "Bowling 
on the Green." This game is going to be 
introduced to Kentucky. After the Dutch- 
man returns from London, Ontario, where 
he will study the game while watching the 
Canadian National Championship, he will 
make all information on "Bowling on the 
Green" available to Kentuckians who write 
him at his new offices in Jeffersontown, 
Kentucky. 

The Jefferson County Playground and 
Recreation Board has moved from down- 
town Louisville to its own office building 
at Colonial Manor, Jeffersontown, Kentucky. 
Write the Dutchman at this address. 

Here are some summer notes: Ashland's 
Courtney Clark was in Louisville for the 
Kentucky-Indiana All Star Game; Paducah 
consolidated all recreational activities un- 
der Art Seelyee, Superintendent and well- 
known basketball official; a 160-acre park 
was opened on an island twelve miles north 
of Louisville with one half in Oldham Coun- 
ty and the other in Jefferson. The south end 
of the island is already being unofficially 
called "Ruby's Point" after the Courier- 
Journal Sports Editor. It was Earl Ruby 
who interested Kentucky and Jefferson 
County authorities in making Twelve Mile 
Island a "Boaters' Paradise" and a "Beach- 
comber's Dream." 

A lady is the winner of the Com Cob 
Pipe of Honor for August. She is Audrea 
McDowell. Her husband, Robert Emmett 
McDowell, wrote the play "Home Is The 
Hunter," now showing in Harrodsburg. 
This is one production worth driving miles 
to see. Andrea's unselfish service to Ken- 
tuckians was in evidence as the play was 
produced. This made her a winner. 

The season is now open for your recom- 
mendations for (1) The Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor, (2) The Abou Ben Adhem, (3) The 
Game Guy. People get a real "lift" from a 
little recognition. Any Kentuckian may 
make recommendations to The Flying 
Dutchman. Make them today. 

The Fifteenth Annual School of Me- 
chanics for basketball officials will be pre- 
sented by the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association at the Phoenix Hotel in 
Lexington on August 11 and 12, 1963. This 
School has attracted wide attention across 
the Country and much favorable comment 



has been received relative to this method of 
teaching mechanics to basketball officials. 
When this session in August is followed up 
with the fifteen regional basketball clinics 
scattered over Kentucky in September and 
October, a comprehensive program of train- 
ing for basketball officials is completed. 

Anyone interested is invited to attend 
the basketball school in Lexington. The As- 
sociation brings in one official from each 
of the sixteen regions of the state to be 
trained in officiating mechanics. These men 
then go back to their regions, teaching the 
officials in their areas as they were taught. 
This helps bring about a uniform interpre- 
tation of the Mechanics of Officiating. 

The Dutchman completed his first year 
of a three-year term on the National 
Basketball Rules Committee in March. This 
year the Rules Makers met in Louisville, in 
1964 the Committee will gather in Kansas 
City, and in 1965 the rules will be written 
in Portland, Oregon. The following organi- 
zations are represented as follows on the 
National Basketball Rules Committee: The 
National Collegiate Athletic Association, 8 
Representatives ; The National Federation 
of State High School Athletic Associations, 
4 Representatives ; The Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, 2 Representatives ; The 
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union, 1 
Representative; The Canadian Amateur 
Basketball Association, 1 Representative; 
The Amateur Athletic Union, 2 Representa- 
tives. 

Besides conducting the Kentucky Clinics 
for basketball officials, the Dutchman will 
be on loan from the K. H. S. A. A. to In- 
dianapolis on September 28 and Columbus 
on November 17 to conduct the rules ses- 
sions for the Indiana and Ohio High School 
Athletic Associations. 

At each training session this year, we 
are striving for a large attendance of tim- 
ers and scorers. Each year, the work of 
these assistants to the floor officials be- 
comes increasingly important. We must not 
treat the work of the timers and scorers 
lightly. Games are sometimes won or lost 
at the table, depending on the accuracy 
with which these officials discharge their 
duties. There should be as many scorers 
and timers in attendance this year as the 
officials themselves. 

Will you help make this colmn interest- 
ing this year by sending items to The 
Dutchman which you would like to see in 
this column? 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Page Seven 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 
Member Schools in Basketball, 1962-1963 



SCHOOL 

Adair County 

Adairville 

Ahrens Trade Sch. 

Allen County 

Alvation 

Anderson County 

Annville 

Aquinas 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Attucks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy 

Ballard Memorial 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Betsy Layne 

Bishop David 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Bracken County 

Breathitt County 

Breckinridge Co. 

Breckinridge Trn. 

Bremen 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Bishop Broseart 

Bryan Station 

Buckeye 

Buckhorn 

Burgin 

Burnside 

Bush 

Butler 

Butler County 

Caldwell County 

Calhoun 

Calloway County 

Camargo 

Campbell County 

Camp Dick Robinson _. 

Campbellsville 

Caneyville 

Carlisle 

Cralisle Co. 

Carr Creek 

Crarollton 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Centertown 

Central City 

Central 

Chandler's Cbapel 

Christian County 

Clark County 

Clarkson 

Clay 

Clay County 

CUfty 

Clinton County 

College 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden Co. 

Cub Run 

Cuba 

Cumberland 

Cumberland Co. 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dawcon Springs 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 


















COj 


lCH 






(h'h'l 


^lAI.f 






CROWD 






■IK 


AM 


K 


G 


F 


P 


B 


<; 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


K 


a 


F 


3?, 


9 


4 


4 


43 


4 


1 





32 


9 


5 


2 


35 


10 


2 


27 


10 


5 


1 


35 


8 








27 


13 


1 


2 


27 


14 


2 


11 


2 


1 





10 


4 








11 


3 








8 


4 


2 


4Z 


5 


1 


1 


45 


4 








43 


5 


1 





46 


4 





23 


12 


1 


7 


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39 


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28 


21 


3 


2 


34 


16 


3 1 



Page Eig^ht 




THE KENTUCKY 


HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE 


FOR AUGUST, 


1963 




60 
64 
52 
26 
57 
37 
49 
40 
32 
25 
10 
34 
38 
43 
19 
24 
32 
38 
37 
46 
49 
16 
35 
38 
36 
30 
41 
64 
32 
37 
56 
33 
42 
33 
37 
42 
43 
33 
27 
37 
43 
39 
47 
51 
35 
51 
25 
41 
44 
39 
25 
21 
24 
40 
21) 
34 
43 
34 
38 
36 
23 
32 
28 
36 
42 
22 
36 
54 
42 
38 
39 
41 
37 
34 
56 
43 
67 
41 
48 
28 
61 
34 
36 
27 
31 
36 
41 
49 
49 
27 
26 
48 
28 
24 
43 
70 
5S 
47 
68 


19 
3 

15 

10 

21 

18 
8 

11 

12 

13 
2 

15 

14 
8 
5 

12 
6 

10 

14 

24 

18 
8 
8 
4 

10 

13 
5 
4 
3 

17 
7 

15 
5 

11 

15 

10 

17 
8 

15 
9 

10 
9 

25 
2 
8 
5 
6 
6 
7 
5 
6 
2 
6 

11 

12 
9 
4 
4 
6 
8 

18 
6 
8 
9 
3 
9 

14 

31 
2 
8 
8 
9 
8 
6 

15 
3 
4 
6 
8 
5 

14 
4 
3 

16 

12 

19 
2 
5 

22 

10 

10 

32 
2 

10 
7 

23 

36 

13 

23 


3 
1 
5 

2 
5 
1 
3 
2 
2 
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4 
3 
1 
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2 
1 
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2 
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4 

3 
1 
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3 


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2 
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3 
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3 


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4 
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56 
60 
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26 
63 
46 
51 
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40 
61 
54 
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39 
41 
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53 
38 
43 
37 
52 
43 
37 
35 
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27 
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66 
35 
38 
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46 
71 
43 
51 
31 
63 
36 
34 
34 
39 
39 
40 
60 
64 
28 
28 
45 
27 
28 
47 
60 
67 
62 
78 


25 
7 

11 
7 

21 

15 
5 

10 

12 

12 
3 

17 

15 
9 
3 

10 
6 
8 

14 
9 

13 
3 
4 
4 
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12 
7 
3 
3 
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11 

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6 
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3 





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48 
45 
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35 
33 
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17 
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40 
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30 
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55 
30 
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37 
32 
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35 
31 
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26 
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30 
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63 
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34 
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49 
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24 
25 
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39 
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33 

17 

27 

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31 

17 

14 

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16 

14 

6 

16 

16 

16 

5 

17 

6 

12 

16 

28 

21 

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6 

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11 

9 

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26 

18 

10 

10 

13 

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24 

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17 

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8 

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30 

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6 

8 

8 

8 

8 

6 

4 

11 

16 

9 

26 

7 

12 

19 

20 

8 

12 

10 

4 

11 

18 

49 

5 

10 

10 

13 

16 

10 

17 

5 

10 

13 

21 

4 

19 

8 

6 

18 

14 

20 

5 

9 

20 

5 

11 

36 

6 

14 

10 

44 

48 

20 

29 


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3 
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3 
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6 


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2 


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1 

3 
2 

2 
3 
1 

3 



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1 



3 
1 



1 
2 
1 
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3 
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2 

3 
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1 


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2 





3 
2 
2 
2 

1 


6 



1 
4 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 

3 

2 
5 
1 
1 


1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


49 
51 
50 
27 
49 
39 
41 
38 
30 
26 
7 
31 
39 
33 
19 
20 
30 
35 
37 
49 
50 
21 
39 
44 
38 
29 
34 
64 
34 
39 
44 
38 
47 
27 
44 
35 
29 
26 
26 
29 
37 
48 
48 
48 
28 
41 
27 
41 
41 
38 
21 
20 
24 
37 
26 
29 
22 
33 
38 
33 
22 
28 
32 
39 
41 
21 
35 
42 
42 
32 
37 
39 
27 
37 
58 
38 
63 
38 
42 
31 
38 
29 
36 
30 
30 
38 
34 
39 
53 
28 
26 
36 
29 
26 
43 
54 
43 
44 
54 


32 1 
15 
22 
8 
30 
16 
11 
14 
10 
10 
6 
20 
12 
18 
3 
12 
8 
15 
15 
22 
13 
5 

5 

3 
10 
15 
12 

6 

4 
14 
16 
13 

5 
13 
11 
19 
20 
13 
16 
11 
11 

3 
24 

5 
14 
12 

4 

7 
10 

7 

8 

4 

7 

9 
11 
14 
22 

6 

7 
13 
15 
10 

5 

6 

6 

9 
18 
40 

3 
13 

7 
16 
14 

4 
13 

6 

9 
10 
16 

3 
27 

5 

4 
10 
17 
17 

8 
16 
18 

8 
10 
36 


14 
10 
40 
48 
16 
33 


6 
2 
3 
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4 
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5 
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1 
3 
3 
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2 


5 



2 
6 
1 
1 
5 
2 
1 
9 
2 
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7 
8 
1 
2 
1 
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2 
1 
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2 
1 


5 
2 
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1 
6 
3 
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3 
4 
6 
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1 
3 
2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

4 
1 
4 
1 


1 

2 
3 
14 


1 

5 

6 












1 











Dixon _ _ __ 


1 




1 









2 




3 


















1 


Dunbar (Mayfield) 







3 





















2 









1 














2 

















Eminence 












1 




1 


Ezel _ - _ 




Fairdale ._ „ ._ 




Fairview „ - ._ 


1 




3 


















1 


















2 















Fordsville — — — 


2 
























7 







Frederick-Fraize — 





Fredonia 


1 







Fulton 












3 





























3 




4 




1 




1 


Greenup _.. 


?. 












Hall 


1 




1 




2 









(1 









3 


Hazel Green . ._ 










Heath . . 


4 


Hellier 


2 




3 









3 






Henry County 




High Street 




Highlands 








Hiseville 




Hitchins 




Holmes -- 




Holy Cross — 




Holy Family __ 




Holy Name 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Page Nine 



Hopkinsville 

Horse Branch 

Hughc'j Kirk 

Huston ville 

Inez 

Irvine 

Irvington 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

Junction City 

J. W. Million 

King-doni Come 

Knott County 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue County 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitchfield 

Leslie County 

Letcher 

Lewisburg 

Lewis County 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Linclon I Middlesboro) _ 

Lincoln (Paducah) 

Lincoln (Stanford) 

Lincoln Institute 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Living»3ton Central 

Lloyd Memorial 

London 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day _ 

Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

Lyon County 

McCreary County 

McDowell 

M(iKee 

McKell 

McKinney 

Mackville 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Madisonville 

Male 

Martin 

Mason County 

Mason 

Mayfield 

Maysvillc 

Maytown 

M. C. Napier 

Meade County 

Meade Memorial 

Memorial (Hardyville) _ 
Memorial ( Way nesburg) 

Menifee County 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middleburg 

Middlesborough 

Midway 

Millersburg Mil. Inst. _ 

Model 

Montgomery County — 

Monticello 

Morgan County 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central 

Mullins 

Munford ville 

Murray College 

Murray 

Nancy 

Newport 

NewDort Catholic 

Nicholas County 

North Hardin 

North Marshall 

North Middletown 

North Warren 



[ 4 


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4 


3 


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4 


5 








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30 


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5 





40 


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62 


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30 


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27 


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1 


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7 


1 





35 


12 


1 





36 


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8 


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47 


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9 


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31 


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57 


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7 


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49 


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8 1 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Oakdale Christian _. 

Oil Springs 

Oldham County 

Old Ky. Home 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida Institute 

Owen County 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owingsville 

Owsley County 

Paducah Tilghman _. 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

ParkKVille 

P L. Dunbar 

Pendleton 

Perryville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

Pine Mountain 



■ille 



Pleasant View 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Poplar Creek 

Powell County 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard 



Pulaski County 
Ralph Bauche 
Raceland 



Red Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville 

Riverside Christian 
Ri 



Rockhold 

Rc'ienwald-Dunbar (Nicholasville) 

Rosenwald (Harlan) 

Rctienwald (Madisonville) 

Rowan Co. 

Russell County 

Russell 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha 

St. Agnes 

St. Aloysius 

St. Augustine 

St. Benedict 

St. Catherine 

St. Charles 

St. Francis 

St. Henry 

St. Jc'-seph (Bardstown) 

St. Joseph (Bowling Breen) 

St. Mary's 

St. Mary-of-the-Woods 

St. Patrick 

St. Thomas 

St. Vincent 

St. Xavier 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Sayre 

Scott County 

Scottsvilla 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Seneca 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

South Hopkins 

South Marshall 

South Portrjmouth 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Symsonia 

Taylor County 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

Todd County 

Todd Co. Training 

Tollesboro 



1 7 








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5 


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12 




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7 





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6 


6 


1 


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9 




6 


4 


2 


32 


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3 


2 


27 


9 


2 





29 


6 




15 


1 


2 


19 


11 


1 





12 


17 


1 


1 


22 


5 




2 


1 





39 


1 








33 


5 





2 


34 


6 




10 








32 


9 








29 


10 





2 


31 


8 




6 


2 





31 


4 


1 





29 


7 








29 


G 




15 








52 


9 





2 


37 


19 


3 


4 


46 


14 




15 


1 





39 


14 





2 


33 


16 


5 


1 


37 


14 




5 


2 





36 


5 








29 


12 








31 


8 




1 7 


3 


5 


43 


9 








36 


12 


4 





40 


7 




5 


1 





42 


5 








39 


9 








39 


8 




17 


1 


1 


44 


16 


1 





30 


2] 


4 


6 


33 


25 




6 


2 


5 


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THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Page Eleven 



Tompkinsville 

Trigg County ___ 
Trimble County _ 

Trinity 

Tyner 

University 

Valley 

Van Lear 

Versailles 

Virgie 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Walton- Verona 

Warfield 

Warren County _ 

Wayland 

Wayne County 

West Hardin 

West Hopk'ns — _ 
Wa^tern (Shively) 
Western (Paris) 
Western (Sinai) _ 
West Main Street 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

William Grant ___ 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Wingo 

Wolfe County 

Woodbine 



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AUDIT 



(Continued from Page One) 

State Clinic 103.00 

Grounds Men (State Tournament) 55.00 



K. H. S. A. A. Retirement Fund _ 




3,600.00 


Cross Country: 






Mileage and Local Entertainment 






(State Meet) 


891.00 




Trophies and Awards 


653.61 




Expenses — Regional Meets 


8.00 




Expenses — State Meet 


74.11 


1,626.72 


Football Playoffs: 






Printing _. „ 


81.00 




Trophies and Awards 


1.075.68 










Lodging ^ 


372.00 




Mea's 


1,140.00 




Field Rental 






(Refund on Labor) 


194.00 




Officials 


297.50 
125.75 




Ticket Sellers, Takers, & Guards 






78.18 
30.00 




P. A. Announcer & Scoreboard 




Regional Deficits 


503.48 




Footballs 


71.95 
119.08 




Statisticians _ 




Incidental Expenses — Board Grants 


800.00 






24.70 








Rifle Marksmanship: 






Mileage and Local Entertainment 






(State Tournament) 


230.70 




Trophies and Awards _ _ 


47.33 




Miscellaneous Expenses „ 


9.00 




Officials (State Tournament) 


50.00 


337.03 



Total Disbursements 

Receipts 

Disbursements __. 



___$149,897.36 

.$194,804.86 
. 149,897.36 



Cash Balance $ 44,907.50 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 30, 1963 S 46,773.19 

Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 648 $ 29.00 

No. 733 30.00 

No. 799 33.00 

No. 879 30.00 

No. 911 60.00 

No. 947 80.00 

No. 961 54.00 

No. 963 30.00 

No. 968 167.40 

No. 977 80.00 

No. 980 162.88 

No. 1004 80.00 

No. 1005 96.49 

No. 1006 118.88 



No. 1007 30.50 

No. 1008 8.53 

No. 1009 600.00 

No. 1010 175.01 1,865.69 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1963 « 44,907.50 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance — Frist Security National 

Bank & Trust Co. $ 44,907.50 

U. S. Savings Bonds (Value June 30, 

1963) 64,145.30 

Savings Account — 1st Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n 10.000.00 

Savings Account — Union Fed. Savings 

& Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Savings Account — Lexington Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1963 $139,052.80 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. Building 

and Equipment $ 98,675.50 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1963 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $168,241.75 

Profit on Program 1,696,23 

Radio Fees 1,890.00 

Redeposits 40.00 $171,867.98 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 1,077.69 

Trophies and Awards 673.52 

Postage 200.00 

Insurance 839.45 

Incidental Expense — (16) Teams 8,000.00 

Transportation 1,558.72 

Lodging 4,173.79 

Meals 5,973.35 

Coliseum Rental 9,000.00 

Organist 80.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1,765.48 

Scorers and Timers 480.00 

Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians 240.00 

Ushers 4,144.00 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers and Guards 750.00 

Public Address Announcers 180.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 66.77 

Films 350.00 

Towel Service 105.00 

Miscellaneous Expense Tour. Mgr. 72.65 

Honorariums and Expenses — 

Ass't Tour. Managers 1,015.68 

State Sales Tax 4,895.83 

Detective Service 505.30 

Bad Checks 73.00 $ 46,220.23 

Transfer of Funds — Amount Transferred to 

K. H. S. A. A. as Tournament Profit $125,647.75 



Pag-e Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Schools Ratings on 
Basketball Officials 

The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1962-63. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent. Good. Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abernathy, George, 0-1-0-0 : Adams. Lucian. 0-1-0-1 ; Adams, 
Troy E., 1-6-9-4 : Adkins, Bill, 5-4-0-1 ; Adkins, Wendell, 3-15- 
4-1 ; Akins, Charlie, 9-22-5-2 : Akridge, Dean, 6-6-2-0 ; Albright, 
G. F., 2-4-2-0 ; Alexander, Howard S., 0-1-0-0- : Alexander, 
Leon, 0-1-0-0 : Alexander, Rex, 10-13-1-0 : Allen, Ed L.. 0-10- 
0-0: Allen, James W., 1-1-0-0: Allen, Lowi-y R., 22-28-18-4; 
Allen. Nelson R., 55-31-8-3 : Andel-s, Raleigh A., 2-10-1-1 : 
Anderson, Don, 1-0-0-0 ; Armstrong, James W., 0-6-0-0 : Austin, 
W. G.. 4-8-1-1 : 

Babbage. Don R., 0-4-3-1 ; Back, Bill, 13-7-0-0 : Baker. 
James E., 10-7-3-1 : Baker, Robert M., Jr., 7-18-2-1 : Ball, 
Delbert, 3-5-0-1: Ballaban, Tom, 9-13-1-2: Ballard, Jack H., 
11-14-1-1; Ballard, Shirley. 1-6-0-0: Bankemper, Thomas, 3-4- 
6-0 : Barker, Bob R., 0-7-1-0 ; Barker, Walter D., 8-15-3-0 ; 
Barlow, Bill B.. 2-1-0-0 : Barlow. Bill R.. 0-4-1-0 : Bai^dtin, 
Sylvester. 0-9-0-0 : Bates. Cletus. 2-1-0-0 : Bates. Gardner, Jr., 
13-14-1-4: Baughn. E. L.. 12-23-4-1: Begley. Berlie B.. Jr.. 
0-2-0-2 : Begley. Jack, 0-4-0-0 : Bell, Clarence T., 4-16-3-2 : 
Bell, Henry Burnett, 1-3-3-3 : Bell. Jimmy D.. 0-0-1-1 : Bene- 
dict. Johnny, 9-5-1-1 : Bennett. Bert A.. 0-0-1-0 : Bennett, 
Gene, 6-7-3-0: Bentley, James. 0-1-1-0: Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., 
2-6-0-1 : Bero, James J., 0-6-1-1 : Bibb. William C. 14-10-3-0 : 
Bickers. Homer G., 5-15-4-0 : Bishop. Heulyn, 4-6-0-1 : Black. 
Amos, 0-1-0-1 : Black, Clarence, 7-6-3-0 : Blackburn, Adrian, 
2-4-0-0 : Blackburn, Tennyson R., 1-0-1-0 : Blankenship, Zeb, 
2-9-0-0 : Blevins, Boone, Jr.. 7-5-0-2 : Boehm. Robert "Ted", 
6-14-5-0: Bomersbach, Hovte, 0-2-0-0: Borden, W. B.. 3-15-5-2: 
Bajch. Bill, 24-10-1-2 : Bowling, Roy, 2-12-8-0 : Bowman E. 
G.. 7-6-1-3 : Boyd. Jerry A.. 0-5-1-0 : Boyles. Paul E.. 27-25- 
6-5 : Bradford, Earl E.. 15-8-2-3 : Bradshaw. Bill, 2-12-3-0 : 
Bradshaw, Frank, 3-11-1-1 : Bradshaw, Johnny L., 1-1-1-1 : 
Branaman. Bill, Jr., 6-8-2-0 : Brashear, Loy Ray, 0-5-3-0 : 
Brewer, Randell, 1-1-3-0 : Brichler. Joe A.. 1-7-2-1 : Bridges. 
Bennie E.. 11-18-2-2: Briscoe. Hubert. 0-1-1-2: Brize'idine. 
Vic. 18-6-0-2 : Broaddus. William D.. 0-0-1-1 : Browder. Homer 
Lee, 0-0-1-1: Brown, E. C, 11-32-5-3: Brown, J. Carlton, 11- 
23-3-2: Brown, James W., 2-6-0-1: Brown, John W.. 13-14-0-4: 
Brown. Paul D., 1-0-1-0: Brown. Thomas F., 3-11-1-0: Brown- 
ing. Earl E., 3-0-0-2 : Brummett. Joseph W.. 19-31-2-3 : 
Bruner. Jack C. 18-23-2-0 : Bryan. William B.. 0-2-0-0 : Buis, 
Nathaniel. 6-26-5-0: Bunnell. Kenneth L.. 2-14-2-6: Burchett, 
Lanier, 4-16-0-0 : Burke, Harry R., 6-7-2-1 : Burkett, Garvis, 
0-2-0-0 : Burks, Rucker W., 1-2-0-0 : Burrowy, Walter H.. Jr.. 
1-3-0-0: Butcher. Douglas. 9-21-7-1: Butcher. Granville. 10-19- 
1-0 : Butler, Bob. 0-2-0-1 : Butler, Donald A.. 2-4-2-5 : Butner 
Billy M.. 2-6-2-1 : 

Cain. Robert Bruce, 0-0-2-0 ; Cain, William Ronald, 
9-10-1-3 ; Caldwell, James A., 2-23-3-1 : Campbell. French, 
1-0-0-0 : Campbell, George H., Jr., 0-4-0-0 ; Campbell. John, 
Jr., 9-6-0-0 : Campbell, Keller, 0-3-0-0 : Campbell. Lonnie. 
0-1-0-1 : Cantrell, Hubert E.. 1-1-1-0 : Caple. Harold E., 
4-17-4-1 : Carpenter, Arthur, 1-0-0-0 : CalTJenter, Leonard F.. 
3-5-0-0 : CaiT, Gene P., 0-2-0-0 : Carroll, Joe E., 5-2-1-1 : Cash. 
Randall E.. 7-12-2-4 : Cassady, Charles W.. 5-12-3-2 : Cassell, 
Curtis, 6-21-3-1 : Caster, Boyd J., Jr., 0-4-4-4 : Castle, Jack T.. 
0-2-0-0: Gates. Tommy, 0-4-3-0: Gathers, Bob, 14-13-2-1: Cathey. 
Gene S.. 1-16-2-0 : Chafin. David L., 1-0-0-0 ; Chandler. Jim 
T., 2-7-4-0 : Chandler, Roger A., l-O-O-O ; Chattin, Charles, 
13-21-1-2 : Chinn. Charles Michael, 0-1-0-1 : Clark, Larry W., 
1-3-4-1: Clark, Owen B., ;)-r3-0-0 : Clarke, Edwaid F.. 0-0-1-0; 
Clary, Kenneth, 0-0-0-1 : Cobb, Mike, 1-3-0-0 ; Coleman, 
Daniel L., 0-0-1-0 ; Coleman, Duke, 7-10-0-0 ; Coleman. James 
E., 0-0-0-1 ; Collier, Burnard, 1-2-0-0 : Collins, Hubert, 15-6- 
2-0: Combs, Franklin D.. 13-7-0-1; Combs. Harvey M.. 0-1- 
0-1 : Combs, Keith. 10-10-0-2 ; Combs, W. Eugene, 2-8-1-3 ; 
Combs. William. Jr., 7-9-0-2 ; Conley, Connie B., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Conley, Elzie Jr., 2-4-1-0 : Conley, Ted L., 5-13-5-0 ; Conn, 
John D.. 0-3-2-2 : Conway, James M., 1-4-1-1 ; Cooksey, Mar- 
vin O.. 0-4-1-0 : Cooper. Hewlett. 2-1-2-0 : Cooper, Warren. 
22-16-0-0 ; Corley, William H.. 5-4-1-2 ; Cornett, John M., 
12-16-2-3 ; Covington, Richard, 2-0-3-2 ; Cox, Charles Glenn, 
0-1-0-3 : Cox, Colin Kelly, 0-1-0-0 ; Cox, Ralph. 2-1-0-0 ; Cox, 
Rufus A.. 6-4-0-0 : Craft. Bill. 19-20-3-1 : Crager, Bobby F.. 
6-16-0-2 : Crawford, Donald R., 3-17-2-3 ; Crawford, Tom, 
9-1-0-1; Creech, Harvey J., 1-7-0-0: Crocetti, Dom, 0-2-0-0; 
Culp, Ronald D., 5-5-1-0; Gulp, Willard E., 2-2-2-0; Cummins, 
Al, 7-17-3-1: Cummins, Curt'y L., 4-3-1-0; Cunningham, 
Jack D.. 0-0-1-0 ; Cunningham, Julian R., 12-14-3-0 ; Current, 
Ellis Ray, 1-8-2-0 ; 

Dame, L. J., 0-25-11-5; Daniels, Bob, 1-2-1-1; Daniels, 
Rboert A., 0-0-1-0 ; Daum, Charles A.. 1-2-O-0 ; Davenport, 
Bowman, 6-3-1-0 : Davenport, Robert B., 2-9-4-1 : Davis, Bunny, 
1-5-0-2: Davis, Curt, 0-1-0-0; Davis, Harold T., 3-11-1-1; 
Davis. Ralph C, 4-4-0-2; Davis Ralph E.. 10-11-2-1; Davis, 
William P., 3-6-1-1 : Dawson, Alby, 1-1-2-0 ; Day, Bill E.. 
1-6-0-0; DeGroote, James, 0-2-2-0; Deim, Martin F.. 6-16- 
6-2 ; DeMoisey, Fox, 16-25-6-3 : Dennedy, T. Robert, 0-1-1-0 ; 
Denney, Murrell C, 0-2-0-0 ; Denton, Charles, 0-1-0-0 ; Derrick 



MALE WINS RIFLE CHAMPIONSHIP 




(Left to Rieht) Hunt, St. Clair, Givan (individual 
Hodges, Vettiner (individual champion). 

Louisville Male High School for the second 
straight year won the State Rifle Tournament 
sponsored by the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association. This was the second year for the state 
championship event. Eight teams participated in the 
championship, which was held at Millei'sburg Mili- 
tary Institute on April 27, 1963. The tournament was 
managed by Capt. William G. Adams of M.M.I. 

The Male rifle team finished with 1,884 points 
out of a possible 2,000. Owensboro High School was 
runner-up with 1,845 points, and Kentucky Military 
Institute was third with 1,802. 

The individual champion was Vettiner of Male 
with 384 points. Givan of Male was second with 383, 
and Pyle of Owensboro High School was third with 
378. 

Team and individual scores were as follows: 

Male (1884)— Givan, 383; Hodges, 377; Hunt, 
373; Vettiner, 384; St. Clair, 367; 

Owensboro (1845)— Pyle, 378; Smith, 359; Wiss- 
ing, 373; Mu:phy, 368; Stevens, 367; 

Kentucky Military Institute (1802)— Wilkinson, 
340; Ferguson, 361; Duncan, 365; Fredrick, 367; Ott! 
369; 

Millersburg Military Institute (1743) — Breen, 330 
Sellers, 335; Poon, 375; Strong, 340; Hurst, 363; 

Bryan Station (1706)— Bradshaw, 310; Stevens, 
346; Haggard, 352; Fee, 352; Zan-ett, 346; 

St. Joseph Prep (1555)— Sherer, 317; Frank, 278 
Corbett, 305; Padgett, 339; Maloney, 316; 

Danville (1500)— Williams, 278; Spath, 294 
Kriener, 311; Sanders, 295; Hankla, 322; 

Frankfort (1278)— Taylor, 313; Purdy, 274; Bal- 
lew, 297; Lea, 209; Presley, 185. 

son. Richard. 4-0-0-1 ; Deskins. Tilden, 1-0-0-0 ; DeVary, Bill. 
9-10-1-0 ; DiMuzio, Robert M., 13-16-1-1 ; Disken, Jim, 2-12-0-0 ; 
Divine, James Ralph, 8-12-3-2: Divine, Wayne, 8-11-3-0: 
Dixie. Cornelius P., 1-5-2-0 ; Dixon, Charles T., 0-3-0-0 ; Dob- 
son, Kenneth, 7-23-3-2 ; Doll, Louis E.. 0-0-2-0 ; Dorsey, James. 
6-15-3-1; Dotson, W. S., 0-3-0-0; Downing, David M., 0-0-2-0; 
Drahman, Thomas W„ 0-0-2-0 : Drake, Richard, 9-32-4-2 ; 
Draughn, Bartram, 8-6-0-0 ; Driskell, Earl, Jr., 1-2-0-0 ; Driver, 
Bob, 3-15-3-1 ; Duemon. William R., 7-27-4-0 ; Duff, Birchell, 
21-11-3-1; Duff, Earl, 10-6-0-1; Dunaway, Adrian, 3-3-0-1; 
Duncan. Earl. 0-0-1-0; Durkin. Jack. 14-16-4-2; Dutton. 
Henly C. 0-2-1-0 : Duvall. Thomas J., Sr.. 1-4-2-1 ; 

Eades. Jimmy, 9-24-6-6 ; Earles, Charles, 0-1-1-2 ; Edelen, 
Ben R.. 18-2-1-0: Edwards, Don, 21-15-1-1: Edwards, Jimmy, 
1-1-1-0; Elkins, R. Percy. 2-10-2-1; Ellington. James E., 
3-12-1-1 ; Elliott, Carroll L., 36-49-12-6 ; Ellis, Johnny. 1-0-0-0 : 
Elmore, Jimmy A.. 1-1-0-0 ; Embry. Dr. C. P., 8-12-10-1 ; 
Ernst. Edward R.. 0-1-0-0 : 

Fairchild. Kenton, 13-14-3-4 ; Fallon, Robert J., 2-1-1-1 
Fancher, William D., 0-0-2-0; Fandrich, William W,, 0-4-0-0; 
Fannin, Ben, 2-2-1-0 ; Farish. Merlin, J., 0-1-0-0 ; Farlee, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOE AUGUST, 1963 



Page Thirteen 



Harold. 4-7-2-0 ; Farley, Jimmy, 0-7-5-2 ; Farmer, John Clay, 
0-1-0-0; Farmer, Ralph L., 4-12-5-0; Feher, A, J., 2-10-0-0; 
Fenton, Don J., 1-0-0-1 ; Ferrell, Doctor T., 27-8-1-0 ; Ferrell, 
Jimmy L., 0-6-1-2; Fields, Jerry J., 1-5-4-1; Finley, Albert 
R.. 1-11-1-1 ; Finley, Ron, 4-9-3-0 ; Finley, Sam, 0-0-1-0 ; 
Fiske, Capt. John R., 0-1-0-0 ; Flaugher, Allen, 7-17-2-2 ; 
Fly, Edward L., 2-6-3-1 ; Flynn, Robert D., 28-24-3-2 : Fort, 
John W., 3-0-0-0 : Foster, Berryman E., 6-18-1-0 ; Fcuter, 
William R., 27-16-0-0; Fowler. Charles, 1-3-1-0; Fraley, Bill, 
3-14-4-1 ; Francis, George, 25-7-1-0 ; Francis, Wendell, 0-3-4-3 ; 
Frazer, Tom Roe, 1-4-0-3 ; Fredricks, Rex, 0-3-2-1 ; Freese, 
Oliver T., O-12-0-0 ; Fritz, Sherman, 24-21-3-3 ; Frye, Gilbert, 
3-11-2-2 ; Fugate, E. Hugh, 4-4-1-1 ; Fulkerson, James R., 
0-2-1-0; Fuller, John R., Jr., 4-12-8-2; Furgerson, William 
W., 1-19-2-: ; 

Gabbard, John B., 0-3-2-0; Gaither, Gene, 5-16-3-4: Gaither, 
Jack, 7-18-3-1 ; Gamble, Gerald E., 0-1-0-0 ; Gardner, Howard. 
0-1-0-0 : Geiser. Robert. 0-2-5-0 ; Gentry. Charles C. 4-1-0-0 ; 
Gerding. James. 1-0-0-0 ; Gettler, John F.. 3-13-7-6 ; Gibson. 
Fred W.. 5-13-4-1 ; Giffin. John S.. 0-2-0-0 ; Gilbert. Gerald 
L.. 25-29-5-1 ; Gilbert, Gordon J., 0-1-0-1 : Gilbert, Lawrence, 
2-0-0-0 ; Gill, Joe. 1-6-0-0 ; Gillespie, Robert C, 5-10-4-3 ; 
Gilligan, Jack, 1-12-1-2; Giordano, Al, 11-8-6-0; Gotf, Reathel, 
2-2-0-0 ; Goires, Herman, 3-9-0-0 ; Coins. Homer. 1-1-0-0 ; Golden, 
Billy Joe. 61-24-3-2 ; Goldsmith. Bill. 0-3-0-0 : Goley. Jim. 
7-23-4-0; Gooch. Lloyd E.. 3-11-1-0; Goodall, Walter. 4-4-2-5; 
Goode. Earl Allan. 2-1-0-0 ; Gordon. Billy K.. 2-4-1-0 : Gorence. 
John P.. 0-6-0-0; Gossett. John P.. 5-11-5-3: Gour, Robert 
A.. 28-55-15-5 : Gourley. Harold E.. 4-4-2-0 ; Cover. David 
Barrett, 0-1-0-0 : Cover, Robert J., 5-3-2-1 ; Grace, H. E., Jr.. 
13-10-1-1 ; Graham. James. 2-8-8-0 ; Craves, Pfeston H.. 
0-1-5-0 ; Craves. Robert L.. 0-1-1-2 ; Gray. Raymond, 2-20-1-0 : 
Green. Walter, 13-10-0-0 ; Crigsby, Pete, Jr., 6-8-0-1 : Crisham, 
Jessee R., 2-10-6-0 ; Guess, Kenneth E.. 0-2-1-0 ; Gumm, 
Kenneth E., 5-4-6-1 ; 

Haap, Virgil L., 0-3-1-0 ; Hadden. Newell P.. Jr.. 4-6-1-1 : 
Hagan. Joe. 6-6-0-0 ; Hogedorn. Thomas. 4-10-3-0 : Hagen, 
William R.. 1-0-0-0 ; Hale, Jamt.j J., 0-0-1-0 ; Hale, John 
1-7-0-0 ; Hall, Douglas, 0-0-4-3 ; Hall, Elvis, 19-23-4-3 ; Hall, 
Jack, 1-1-0-0: Hall, Mac, 0-1-0-0; Hamm, L. E.. 1-6-2-2: 
Hamm. Michael R.. 0-0-1-0 : Hammons. Norman, 12-29-1-2 : 
Hampton, Ray, 1-0-1-0 ; Hardin, Carl Ray, 1-6-2-2 ; Hardin, 
Don G., 4-3-1-1 ; Hardin. Jacji H.. 1-2-4-0 ; Hardin. William 
R.. 8-12-3-1 : Hargis. Bobby S.. 8-14-2-1 ; Harned. Vic. 21-24-1-0 ; 
Harper. Bruce D.. 0-0-2-0 ; Harper. Robie. Jr.. 15-25-4-1 ; 
Harrell, Bill D.. 0-1-0-0 : Harrison, Freddie W., 3-0-1-1 ; Harvey, 
Bennie, 6-7-2-0; Harville, Robert, 15-24-10-2; Hatfield, Cecil 
E., 3-7-1-0 ; Hatfield, James. 1-1-2-1 : Hatter. Jack. 3-11-4-1 ; 
Hatter. William F.. 0-7-1-0 : Hawkins. Will A.. 0-2-0-0 ; Hayden. 
Samuel J., 9-14-2-1: Haynes, John, 7-6-6-1: Haynes, William 
T.. 0-0-3-0 : Hedge. David W.. 0-9-4-0 ; Heitzman. Warren E.. 
0-0-1-0 ; Heldman. Dr. John. Jr.. 2-0-0-0 ; Henderson. George 
R., 1-1-0-0 ; Henderson, Robert L., 1-4-1-0 ; Henson, Tony C 
4-20-4-1 ; Hewitt, R. T., 14-22-3-1 : Hicks. Floyd E.. 0-2-2-0 : 
Higgins, Bobby D.. 0-0-0-2 ; Hill. Clyde E.. 3-1-0-0 : Hill. 
Earl F.. 10-17-1-0; Hill, Martin, 0-0-0-1; Hinton, Heni-y, 1-2-0-1; 
Hitch, Kenneth L.. 0-2-1-1 ; Hitt, Billy D., 0-5-0-0 ; Hobte. 
Charles V.. 12-19-7-2 : Hobbs. Fred L.. 0-0-1-0 ; Hobbs. William 
Paul. 0-3-2-0 : Hobby. Bill. 1-10-7-1 ; Hodge. Fred A.. 4-9-1-1 ; 
Hofstetter. Joe. 3-6-0-0 : Hogg. Bill. 8-14-6-10 : Holden, Frye H., 
1-3-2-1 ; Holeman. Bill R.. 4-10-1-0 ; Holmes. Robert D.. 0-3-3-2 : 
Holt. Alton. R., 3-4-0-2 ; Holt, Glenn, 3-6-0-2 ; Holtzclaw, James 
R., 2-14-1-1; Hook, B. B.. Jr., 5-22-6-0: Horn, Dick, 1-12-4-2; 
Horton, John, 2-2-1-1 ; Houchin, William B.. 0-1-0-0 : Howard. 
Bruce L.. 1-1-1-1 ; Howard. Henry D., 0-0-1-0 : Howard, Ledger, 
8-6-3-2 ; Howell, Jerome. 0-1-1-1 ; Huber. Jerry. 0-0-2-0 ; Hudnall. 
William E., 0-0-1-0 : Hudson, Oscar, 0-2-0-0 ; Huggins, Jim, 1-9- 
1-2; Hughes, Charles, 52-7-2-0; Huiet, Fred, 25-11-1-0: Hull, 
Joel L.. 0-0-2-0 ; Hulsey, Donald R., 0-3-0-0 ; Hummer, Irby, 
10-36-2-1 : Hunley, Neil P.. 7-10-2-0 ; Hurley, Robert, 0-5-2-0 ; 
Hutchens, Jim, 0-2-0-0 ; Hutchinson, Jack, 1-0-0-0 ; Huter Jim, 
19-14-0-0; Hyatt, Bob, 16-13-6-4; Hyland, F. D.. 1-0-0-0; 

Idol. Billy Joe, 5-19,2-2 ; Inman, Briscoe, 37-36-9-2 ; Irwin, 
Charlie, 32-20-7-4: 

Jackrjon, Roy, 1-4-1-0 : Jahnigen, Robert E., 0-1-1-0 : James, 
Carl Edwin, 0-1-0-0; James, Gene, 3-5-1-0; Jenkins, James D., 
7-4-1-n ; Jenkins, Kean, 36-27-4-2 ; Johnson, Gerry, 0-4-3-0 ; 
Johnson, Jack D., 4-10-0-0 ; Johnson, James L., 9-19-1-0 ; John- 
son. James M.. 21-24-6-4 ; Johnson. John Luther, 1-0-0-0 ; John- 
i5on, Leroy. 0-0-0-1 : Johnson. Vernon Lee. Jr., 1-2-3-0 ; John- 
son, Walter, 28-11-1-0 ; Johnson, William Bernard, 10-20-7-2 : 
Jones, Boyer, 19-9-1-2; Jones, Carson G., 7-11-2-5; Jones, 
Char'es, Jr., 6-13-0-0; Jones. Joseph. 0-1-0-0: Jones. Paul. 6- 
20-1-4 ; Jones, Robert T., 0-2-0-0 ; Jones, Walter C, 0-0-0-2 : 
Jordan, Art, 2-23-9-5 ; Jordan, Larry, 3-17-0-2 ; Junker, Edwin 
G., 0-4-2-0 ; 

Kaler, Jerry, 0-1-0-0 ; Keeton, C. E., 1-11-0-2 ; Kensler, 
Orville A., 5-24-6-2 ; Kercher, Norman L.. 1-4-0-0 ; Key. Calvin. 
2-2-1-0; Kimmel, Jerry, 38-25-3-3: King, Dan, 38-20-10-2; King, 
James A.. 16-6-0-0 ; King. P. J.. 1-0-0-0 : King. Rutssell. 1-5-2-2 : 
Kleinschmitt, Richard, 1-3-2-3 ; Kloufetos. Spiro J.. 2-1-0-0 : 
Knight. Bill, 14-14-2-0; Knight, Gary N., 1-0-0-0; Knotts, 
Franklin D., 2-6-3-1 ; Kuhl, Lawrence. 4-4-0-0 ; Kuster, William 
0-2-0-0; 

Ladd. Ronald E., 0-1-0-0; Lambert, Irvin G., 7-4-0-0; 
Lance, Walter, 13-24-2-2 ; Lankert, Norman E., 0-3-0-0 ■ Lar- 
sen, George, 0-7-1-2 ; Lashbrook, Gene, 3-5-2-0 ; Laubheimer, 
Donald T,, 19-38-8-6 ; Lawson, Leland, 3-16-2-0 : Lawson, Ron- 
daJl, 2-3-2-1 ; Lawson, Rondell, 3-5-0-0 ; Lay, William B 7-2- 



ATHERTON GOLF TEAM WINS 




(Left to Right) Potter, Schweitzer, Coach Kiefer, Gift, and 
Dohrman of the Atherton Hight School; (Inset) Acres of the 
Waggener High School, individual champion. 

The Atherton Hig^h School won the 1963 State 
High School Golf Tournament, held at the Fort 
Knox Lindsey Golf Course on May 21-22, with a 
score of 641. The St. Xavier High School was sec- 
ond with 643. Other team scores were: Waggener 
646; Frankfort, 646; College, 653; Trinity, 654 
Owensboro, 654; Clark County, 654; Dixie Heights 
665; Lafayette, 669; St. Joe, 675; Scottsville, 677 
Paintsville, 681; Bowling Green, 685; Eastern, 685 
Flaget, 686; St. Henry, 690; Manual, 691; Beech 
wood, 631; DeSales, 693; Durrett, 698; Madisonville, 
720; Franklin County, 721; Fort Knox, 724; War- 
ren County, 731; London, 752. The tournament was 
managed by Athletic Director John W. Hackett of 
the Fort Knox High School. 

Ron Acr3e of the Waggener Hig'h School, was 
the individual champion with a score of 152. Harry 
Gilbert of College High School was second with 153. 
Individual scores of some of the other tournament 
leaders were as follows: 

155— Meek (Paintsville; Thorp (St. Xavier); 
Schweitzer (Atherton); Luxon (Model) 

156 — Dohrman (Atherton); Auge (Beeohwood); 
Stinnett (Owensboro); Martin (Clark County); Pot- 
ter (Atherton) 

157 — ^Backus (Dixie Heights); Lenahan (Trinity) 

158— Cain (Valley); Callahan (Ashland); Curry 
(Harrison County) 

159— Long (Frankfort); Tinnat (North Hardin) 

160 — ^Leichman (Waggener); Musselman (St. 
Xavier); Hulette (Frankfort); McQueen (Lafayette); 
Moore (Berea); Bums (Owensboro Catholic); Jenk- 
ins (Scottsville); McGuffey (Scottsville); Bunnell 
(Lafayette); Magee (Maysville); Faurest (Mason 
County) 



0-0 ; Lee. Robert L.. 8-6-0-1 : Lee. William. 2-6-0-0 : LeQuire 
Harold M.. 7-15-2-0 ; Leonhardt. Donald. 2-1-0-0 : Liles. Bill 
2-18-1-2 : List. Frank A.. 6-16-6-1 : Litke, Walter, 0-0-0-1 ; Little 
Bernard, 0-1-2-0 : Littlepage, Pryce, 2-7-2-1 : Logue, Ronald G. 
0-5-4-1 ; Long. Bill. 0-2-3-1 ; Long. James E.. 2-1-2-0 : Louden 
Hubert C, 17-24-11-4: Loudy. Kenneth, 10-10-4-0; Lowe, Gene, 
23-17-5-2 ; Lucas. Gene T.. 22-12-2-1 ; Lwjby. George. 6-17-3-2 
Lyons. Charles S.. 3-3-1-0 : Lyons. Tommy L.. 0-0-1-0 : 

McAlister, Ronald D.. 0-5-0-1 : McAnelly. David F.. 7-22-6-2 
McBee. William K.. 0-4-1-0 ; McBride. Donald R.. 4-11-6-1 
McBride. William Kenneth. 15-13-10-1 : McCargo. Frank. 6-22. 
6-1 ; McCarter. Bobby. 2-7-1-1 : McCauley, John E., 4-1-0-0 
McCIure, William Scott, 26-19-2-0 ; McCormick, Lester E., 3 
19-8-7 ; McCowan. Connell. 1-6-1-2 : McCoy, Hayse, 5-18-8-3 
McDonald, Charles W.. 0-3-0-0 ; McCehee, Gordon. 5-16-4-0 
McGlothlin, Leonard, 0-0-0-1 ; McLin, Bruce, 7-3-0-0 ; McLean, 
Gordon, 1-0-0-0 ; McLeod, Dr. Robert N., Jr., 6-3-1-0 ; McMurtry, 
Jim, 0-2-1-0; 

Macy, Lowell Z., 0-2-0-0 ; Madden, McElroy, 1-1-0-0 ; Madon 
Robert Lee, 8-3-0-1 ; Magers, Capt. L. J.. 0-3-1-0 ; Mahan 
Carle. 40-16-7-1 ; Maines. George, 16-28-3-2 : Mallory, David L., 
0-2-1-1 ; Mann, L. Mac, 0-1-1-1 : Marks, Edward W., 3-13-2-3 
Martin, Charlie. 0-1-1-0 ; Mastin, Daryl, 0-1-0-0 ; Matthews, Dr, 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Kentucky High School Tiock Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 17-18, 1963 

100 Yard Dash — 2. Phelps-Old Ky. Home 5. Sauer-St. Xavier 

1. Flipp... -Franklin Lincoln 3. Fox-Madisonville Height — 6'2" 

2. Markham-Paris 4. Pate-Newport 

3. Thomas-Lexington Dunbar 5. Fleming-M.M.L Pole Vault— 

4. Chumbley-Owensboro Time— 20.8 1- J^^^^y-Hai-lan Rosenwald 
5 Eilers-Trinitv ^- Bellamy-Owensboro 

^ ^ rj,;j^^g_9 9 880 Yard Rday— 3. Beyersdoerfer-Highlands 

Flippin tied the old state record of 9.9. 1. Atherton 4. Flandreau-Paris 

Markham, in the third heat, also eqaaled 2. St. Xavier 5. Erwin-Daviess County 

the state record of 9.9. 3 Trinity Height— 12'3 1/2" 

990 YarH Fln^h— 4. Lafayette ST^*'' ^^^ declared winner of the event. 

ZZU lara uasn _ p -J^ Bellamy was awarded the new state rec- 

1. Gordon-Shelbyville "■ J^^^riS ^ri based on measurement by judges. 

2. Flippin-Franklm Lincoln -^""^ l:3_.l t^tai oniivrTa 

3. Gamble-Central jiji^ Relay— lUlAL fUlJNlh 

4. Chumbley-Owensboro ^^ Manual Lafayette 29 

5. Greer-Central 2. St. Xavier St. Xavier 29 

Time— 22.6 3 Trinity Atherton 18 

440 Yard Dash- 4. Lafayette Seneca 18 

1. Gordon-Shelbyville S.Seneca o c.. ^ J^^ \ \a 

2. Miller-Seneca Tmie-3:28.5 Owensboro 14 

3. Sawyer-Harlan Rosenwald ^^^^ ^ut— Sh"lh*^ -11 12 

i- Faeth-Newport Catholic j. Sergeant-Lafayette port CamVell" 12 

5. Graf-St. Xavier 2. Moorman-St. Xavier Franklin Lincoln "::"_"___:: 10 

lime ou.y 3 Dickerson-Eastern Harlan Rosenwald 9 

880 Yard Run— 4. Stewart-Glasgow Paris 8 

1. Yost-Fort Campbell 5. Gahm-St. Xavier Madisonville 7 

2. Vetter-St. Xavier Distance— 56'2%" Old Kentucky Home 6 

3. Gallagher-Lex. Catholic y.. Hancock County 6 

t ^^^^.. °'^^LUnseid-seneca Flxr.^^ill ':!:':.:::::::::: \ 

Time-2:00.3 ^ ''^Z.rl^^^Z:'''' Daviess County 4 

Mile Run— 4. Wachtel-St. Xavier 5, , • " \ 

1. Yost-Foi-t Campbell 5. Howes-Owensboro f l^;f„f„^""r^,Vi,"„"ir \ 

2. Stout-Owensboro Distance-145'%" \ZZt^^^ nnnW \ 

3. Ehrler-Atherton ii^Ti^T Dmhar 3 

4. White-Bourbon County Broad Jump— Hignianas - — — ^ 

5. Wolfe-Holmes 1. Hepburn-Seneca Henderson County 3 

Time-4:28.8 2. Hibbs-Sturgis Newnort 3 

120 Yard Hurdler 3. Merris-Lafayette ^^J^^^^ County"::::!:::::::::: 2 

1. White-Lafayette t' Carter-Bloomfield Newport Catholic 2 

2. Guess-Male S.Pope-Valley „„,„,,„ Glasgow __ 2 

3. Clab^s-Henderson County Distance-22'7y2 p^,^^^ 2 

4. Phelps-Old Ky. Home High Jump Bloomfield 2 

5. Pate-Newport 1. Mundy-Hancock County j^-''^^ j } 

lime— 14.d 2. Monarch-Pleasure Ridg« Pk. ^- .*^- '• "--,- J 

180 Yard Hurdles— 3. Chapman-Daviess County Covington Holmes 1 

1. White-Lafayette 4. Burnette-Fulton 



6-3; Maynard. Andrew J.. 0-0-0-1; Maynard, Lonnie, 0-0-1-0: 
Mayj, Ralph J., 11-6-1-0; Meade, Foster "Sid." 33-21-4-.3 ; 
Meadows. Marvin, 33-12-2-4 : Meeks. Jack, 3-2-0-0 ; Melmige, 
James, Jr.. 3-3-0-0; Melton, Robert E.. 0-0-0-2; Meredith, 
Denny Edwin, Jr.. 5-18-10-2; Metcalf, Earl L.. 21-11-2-0; 
Meyer, Harry J.. 5-18-2-0; Mickey, Elbert W., 4-5-0-0; Middle- 
ton, Johnny. 4-4-0-0 ; Milbern. Daniel Lee. 1-15-2-1 ; Miles, 
Francis M.. 1-4-2-0 ; Miller. Bob, 13-14-2-1 ; Miller, Claude O., 
0-1-0-0 ; Miller, Ferrel, 2-7-3-0 ; Miller, Jack. 1-1-1-1 ; Miller, 
John D., 2-0-0-0 ; Miller, L. O., Jr., 8-3-1-1 ; Miller, Rex J., 
2-3-1-1 ; Miller, Roy J., 0-1-0-0 ; Miller, Roy L., 2-7-2-2 ; Miller- 
haus. William J.. 0-1-0-2; Miracle, Ed, 4-4-1-0; Miracle, Orville, 
1-6-0-0; Mitchell, Billy, 9-34-7-2; Mitchell, Emmett, O-O-I-O ; 
Mitchell. Jim, 8-9-1-0 ; Moll, Francis, 0-11-0-0 ; Monahan, Ed, 
0-3-1-0 ; MontBomery, Don, 0-6-0-0 ; Montgomery, Gordon D., 
0-1-0-0 ; Montgomery. Joe, 0-1-0-0 ; Moore. James E.. 1-7-2-0 ; 
Moore, Robert, 5-29-6-1; Moore, Roy, Jr., 4-15-2-0; Morgan, 
Henry, 1-2-0-0; Morse, Richard K.. 14-20-4-0; Moser, Emerson. 
S-ll-S-4 ; Moser. Rudy Clay. 27-20-9-1 ; Moss. Julian. 4-1-0-0 ; 
Mudd. Ed. 11-14-6-3; Mulligan, J. T., 0-1-4-0; Murdock, Pat, 
0-0-1-0 ; Murphy, Donald J., 0-2-1-1 ; Murphy, Leo T., Jr., 4-16- 
5-2 ; Murphy, Phil J. 1-2-1-0 ; Murray, Thomaii. 0-3-0-0 ; Murrell, 



Allen L., 10-41-3-2 ; 

Napier, Walter. 0-4-0-0 ; Nau, Bill, 5-4-1-1 ; Neal, Gene, 
12-27-7-3 ; Neal, James, 0-9-2-3 ; Nelson Bernard L, 1-1-0-0 ; 
Newman, Bill, 3-4-2-1 ; Newman, Luther G., 6-3-1-0 Newsom, 
Lawrence, 9-1-0-1 ; Newsom, Marley. 0-6-1-0 ; Newton, C. M., 
21-6-0-0 ; Nie, Allen F., 3-2-2-fl ; Nixon. James W., 11-34-7-3 ; 
Noble, Charles B., 2-7-2-0; Noble, Leonard, 1-6-2-0; Nord, Ed, 
9-11-2-1 ; Nunn, Wesley L.. 0-2-1-0 ; 

Oaks, Gary Lee. 0-3-1-1 ; Ogle. Pat. 1-0-0-0 ; Okrueh, 
Nicholas, 0-2-0-0 ; O'Nan. Harold L., 1-18-4-1 ; Osborne. Homer. 
L., 1-3-0-0 ; Overton, Frank, Jr., 2-9-2-0 ; Owens, Vermont, 
0-1-0-0 ; 

Pack, Donald, 3-3-0-0 ; Pack, James W,, 19-25-5-3 : Padgett, 
R. K., 6-17-3-0 ; Palmer, Carl A.. 2-1-0-0 ; Pardue. Robert E., 
8-6-0-0; Park, J. M.. 7-15-5-2; Parker, Billy E.. 14-16-0-0; 
Parsons. W. E., O-l-I-O ; Partridge, William, 1-0-0-0 ; Patrick, 
Ralph, 0-3-0-1 ; Paulin. Al. 0-3-0-0 ; Payne, Gayle, 5-5-4-1 : 
Pearson, Bobby Neal, 0-4-1-2; Peay. Curt'u E., 6-18-6-1; Peden, 
Harlan C, 3-10-3-0; Peeno, Harry R., 0-4-0-0; Pelphrey. Jack 
D., 0-3-1-0; Penrod. Joe B., 18-24-2-3; Pergrem, Nard. 10-6-0-0; 
Perry, Bobby Wayne, 0-0-1-0; Perry, George B., 0-8-0-0; Perry, 
James E., 12-21-2-0; Petett, Frank M., 0-4-1-0; Phelps, David 
F., O-O-O-I ; Phelps, Mervil, 0-5-3-0 ; Phelps, Ray, 4-3-0-0 ; 
Phelps, Rudy, 17-26-4-3 ; Phillips, Ray, 0-2-1-0 ; Pickens, Jim, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



Page Fifteen 



TENNIS DOUBLES— GIRLS 



Presentation 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Presentation 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Presentation 
6-1; 6-1 


FINALS 


Bye 


Sacred Heart 
8-6; 6-4 




Sacred Heart 




Franklin Co. 
6-1; 6-1 






Presentation 


Waggener 


Murray 


6-0; 6-0 


Murray 


Southern 
6-1; 6-4 




Bye 


Franklin Co. 
(forfeit) 


Franklin Co. 


Henderson 
8-5; 5-7; 6-0 

Southern 
6-2; 6-3 




Bellevue 


Cavema 


Cavema 


Bye 


Henderson 
6-1; 8-6 


Henderson 




St. Joseph 


Highlands 
6-4; 6-2 


Highlands 




Lafayette 




Southern 


















Bye 







Presentation 
6-4; 6-2 



2-5-0-0 ; Pike, Robert F., 15-10-3-2 ; Piper, James A., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Pittman, Spencer, 0-2-2-0 ; Pogne, Ivan G., 0-3-0-1 ; Points, 
Charles, Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Powell, Logan G., 4-8-1-1 : Poynter, James, 
0-0-1-0 ; Prather, Edwin Eugene, 0-1-0-0 ; Prather, Wilbur E., 
4-13-6-3 ; Prewitt, Shelby, 1-0-3-0 ; Price, Charles A., 3-14-4-2 ; 
Price, James E., 12-20-2-0 : Prior, Lowell F., 1-6-0-0 ; Pruden, 
Jim, 2-5-5-1 ; Pursifull, CleophvB, 19-13-0-3 ; 

Rainey, Jimmy, 18-19-4-0 ; Rakel, Bob, 0-1-0-0 ; Ramey, 
Herbert Dean, 5-1-0-2 ; Rapp, William, 8-14-2-2 ; Rawlings. 
Charles, 3-10-4-1 ; Rawlings, Harold, 7-21-3-1 ; Redman, Mal- 
vern G., 0-2-0-0 ; Reed, Charles R., 23-20-1-1 : Reed, Gordon, 
16-27-1-4; Reed, William F., Sr., 2-13-5-2; Reinhardt, Jerry 
W., 0-2-0-0 ; Reinhardt, Myron S., 22-33-4-0 ; Reliford, Paul G., 
4-1-0-3 ; Renfro, John E., 1-2-0-1 ; Reschar, John V., Sr., 1-6-0-3 ; 
Re.xroat, Jerry L., 16-35-9-2 ; Reynolds. Howard M., 0-1-1-0 ; 
Rhatigan, Alfred J., 6-7-0-1 ; Rice, Willard S., 2-3-1-0 ; Rice, 
William, Jr., 0-0-1-1 ; Richards, Dallas R., 0-0-1-0 ; Richardson, 
Charles E., 17-13-0-0 ; Ricketts, Claude O., 5-15-1-0 ; Riffe, 
James R., 3-9-4-2 ; Riggs, Floyd L., 1-0-0-0 ; Ring. William H., 
1-7-4-0 ; Rition, Johnny B., 1-0-0-0 ; Ritter, Donald R., 2-2-0-0 ; 
Ritter, Goebel, 20-6-0-0 ; Rivlin, Jule. 0-1-0-0 ; Roach, Earl 
Milton, 1-2-0-0; Roberts, Elza, Jr., 0-1-5-0; Roberts, Ray M., 
0-0-0-2 ; Robertson, William R., 0-5-0-0 ; Robinson, Don, 0-10-0- 
0; Roby, Joseph L., 3-12-4-2; Rodgers, David Glen, 1-5-0-0; 
Rodgers, Tom H., 0-3-0-0 ; Roeckers, Bernie, 2-7-2-0 ; Rogers, 
Howard, 21-26-0-0 ; Roller, Otis C, 0-2-0-0 ; Rolph, Harold J., 
3-2-1-0 ; Rose, Lee H., 20-8-4-0 ; Rose, Wally, 19-16-2-1 ; Rose, 
Walter Scott, 2-0-1-1 ; Rosb, J. Russell, 0-0-0-2 ; Rothfuss, Rich- 
rad, 0-6-2-0 ; Rouse, Clyde L., 6-6-2-2 ; Roy, Charles, 2-3-0-0 ; 
Royse, Pete, 0-1-2-0 ; Rubarts, Leland G., 8-20-4-0 ; Rupert, Ray, 
0-1-0-0; Rushing, Kenneth, 1-6-0-1; Russell, Allen W., 7-19-3-0; 
Russell, Eugene. 2-5-1-3; Russell, Joe, 15-25-1-4; 

St. Clair, Robert L., Jr., 4-6-0-1 ; Salisbury, Franklin D., 
3-0-0-0 ; Sams, Glenn, 2-9-6-2 ; Sandem, Mel, 21-10-0-1 ; Sang, 
Bob, 8-9-2-2 ; Saturley, David, 1-1-0-0 ; Saylor, Lanny Ross, 
0-3-1-0; Schad, Jim, 0-3-0-0; Scharfenberger, Irv T., 0-1-0-0; 
Schlich, Paul, 6-6-0-2 ; Scifres, Norman. 1-0-0-0 ; Scott, Bill 
(Lynch), 2-2-1-1; Scott, Bill (Lexington), 8-3-0-1; Scott, 
Clarence T., 0-0-1-0 ; Secrest, Eldon Wesley, 1-9-4-0 ; Sellman, 
John B., 6-17-12-2 ; Selvy, Curt, 13-8-6-3 ; Settle, Evan E., 2-0-0- 
; Settle, Roy G., 35-16-5-0 ; Sexton, Steven C, 2-2-0-0 ; Sexton, 
William L., 2-3-0-1 ; Shaw, Earl, 12-23-2-1 ; Sheffer, Darrell L., 



0-1-0-1 ; Shephard, James Baker, 0-2-2-0 ; Sherrow. Winston G., 
3-3-1-0 ; Shewmaker, Wayne, 1-2-0-0 ; Shope, Lowell M., 0-2-0-0 ; 
Showalter, John, 6-10-2-2 ; Shuck, Thomas G., 13-8-6-5 ; Shumate, 
Robert T., 0-0-1-1 ; Siler, Ernest Lee, 0-6-0-0 ; Simpson, Paul D., 
2-0-0-0; Singleton, Vesper, 1-0-0-0; Sipes, Frank H., 0-5-0-0; 
Slucher, Kenneth W., 2-1-7-6; Small, William W., 4-2-2-1; 
Smith, David W., 1-3-0-0 ; Smith, Edgar J., 1-1-0-0 ; Smith. 
Wayne N., 39-29-3-0 ; Smith, Willard N., 39-29-3-0 ; Smith, Wil- 
liam E„ 1-6-2-0 ; Smith, Wyatt Jack, 14-16-2-5 ; Smithson, 
Richard A., 18-15-7-2 ; Snorton, Claude, Jr., 0-2-0-0 ; Sojh, 
La Rue, 1-0-1-0; Sosh, Nelson, 1-0-1-0; South. William F., 2- 
6-6-1 ; Spaulding, Stan, 1-1-1-0 ; Spencer, Irvin E., 12-16-1-2 ; 
Spiceland, S. E., 0-7-1-0; Spoonamore, Jim, 0-3-0-0; Stanfill, 
Robert, 1-3-2-0; Staples, Charles, 0-1-0-0; Steely, Stanley E., 
2-9-0-0; Steenken, William R., 4-12-3-0; Stephenson, Harry, 16- 
18-6-4; Stephenson, Thomas H., 3-17-0-1; Stethen, James E., 
0-1-0-0; Stevens, Alex, 15-18-3-0; Stevenson, Forrest, 1-2-1-0; 
Stewart, Herbert, 4-1-1-0 ; Stiff, Maurice, Jr., 13-32-11-3 ; 
Stikeleather, Clyde L., 8-18-3-0 ; Stines, Ray A., 3-14-5-2 ; Stin- 
son, Charles L., 2-8-3-3 ; Stirason, John M., 0-6-0-5 ; Stith, 
Houston, 6-31-3-6 ; Stoess, Henry L., 0-3-0-1 ; Stokes, Tommy 
G., 1-1-0-0 ; Strain, Richard P., 12-22-3-6 ; Straub, Charles. 6- 
19-1-1; Strong, Arnett, 28-11-1-0; Suffill, Bob, 3-13-7-3; Sulli- 
van, Don Chris. 27-23-1-1 ; Swann, Randall, 1-2-0-0 ; Swanner, 
Doyle, 1-6-1-0 ; Swim, Gerald, 8-6-1-0 ; Switzer, Richard, J.. Jr., 

Tackett, Harold, 1-3-0-2 ; Tackett, Jay, 0-1-0-1 ; Tackett, 
Layne, 3-4-0-0; Tarlton, Thomas O., 6-11-6-3; Taylor, Billy 
Joe, 1-0-0-1 ; Taylor, Dennis H., 0-1-0-0 ; Taylor, Ed, 2-8-1-0 ; 
Taylor, Morris M., Jr., 0-2-0-0 ; Taylor, 3-5-0-0 ; Taylor, Rogers 
E. 27-14-4-1 ; Tegethoff, Kenneth, 0-1-0-0 ; Tharpe, Robert L., 
0-1-0-0; Thoma, M. L., 14-9-3-2; Thomas, Charles, 4-9-0-0; 
ThomaG, Frank M., 0-3-0-0 ; Thompson, Arthur Lee, 8-0-0-0 ; 
Thompson, Jack, 25-9-1-0; Thompson, Thomas A., 0-0-1-0; 
Tinsley, Marion Francis, 13-28-7-4 ; Tirey, Lt. Col. James H., 
2-1-0-1 ; Todd, W. O. Jr., 0-4-3-0 ; ToUey, Harold B., 0-3-2-1 ; 
Trivette Dale, 0-1-0-1 ; Troutman, Doyle C, 11-7-1-1 ; Tuck, 
Lillard Ochell, 11-18-4-1 ; Tucker, Neal R., 0-3-1-1 ; Tucker, 
Roscoe, Jr., 0-3-0-0 ; Turner, Bruce, 0-1-1-0 ; Turner, Jack, 0- 
3-0-0 ; Tyre, Donald C, 2-12-3-1 ; Urlage, Richard, 2-7-1-1 ; 

Vance Hunter, Jr., 0-5-2-3 ; Vanover, Walter S., 2-10-3-1 ; 
Van Winkle, Billy. 1-8-0-0 ; Van Zant, Jim, 6-3-0-0 ; Vaughn, 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1963 



IT IS STILL NOT TOO LATE 

TO ARRANGE FOR STUDENT 

ACCIDENT AND ATHLETIC 

INSURANCE. WE OFFER GOOD 

COVERAGE AND FAIR AND 

EFFICIENT SERVICE. 

*7<4e Kin<fde4t Gomfuuuf general 



AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 252-8522 



Ronald G., 0-1-0-0; Vaughn, Melvin, 0-0-1-0; Veneklase, Ken- 
neth H., 0-4-0-0 ; Vermillion, Charles D.. 10-6-0-3 ; Vescovi 
Raymond B., 0-9-1-0 ; Vinson, Ray T., 10-5-0-2 ; Vippei-man, Al 
1-5-1-2 ; Visscher, Robert W., 4-4-3-0 ; Vowell, Darrell. 1-9-2-3 

Wagner, Marvin Rudy, 3-5-1-0 ; Waide, Harry D., 1-8-2-0 
Walker. Paul R., 6-13-4-3 ; Wallace, James E., 4-8-2-0 ; Wallen, 
Howard W., 5-8-0-0; Waller, Bobbie E., 1-0-0-0; Wafeh 
Herschel N., 0-1-0-0 ; Walters, Bob. 0-2-0-0 ; Walters, Darwin 
0-0-0-1 ; Walton, Roy, 2-10-2-0 ; Wanchic, Nick. 14-8-0-0 ; Ward 
Jack, 4-14-6-1 ; Warner. Marvin. 0-2-0-0 ; Watkins. Paul D. 
0-2-0-0 ; Way, James. 0-3-0-0 ; Wearren. Wade H.. 5-3-1-1 
Weathers. Charles. Jr., 1-2-3-0 ; Weaver, Ray, 2-14-4-0 ; Webb, 
Jerry B., 0-1-1-0 ; Weber, John, 5-6-1-0 ; Weiner, Richard Allen 
1-5-0-0 ; Welch, John H., 0-6-2-0 ; Wells, Milford James, 4-3-0-0 
West, Art F., 3-1-1-0 ; West. Jimmy. 1-1-1-1 ; Westerfield, Glenn 
5-5-0-4; Westhoff. Robert A., 0-1-0-0; Weyer. James G.. 5-0-0-1 
Whalen, William C, 0-2-0-0 ; Wheatley. Donald. 0-4-0-0 ; White, 
Carl Wayne. 0-1-0-0 ; White. Charlaj W.. 0-1-0-0 ; White, David 
B., 9-18-8-5; White, James, 11-8-2-1; White, J. L., 8-11-5-0 
Whitehead. J. R., 5-10-6-2 ; Williams, Bobby. 0-5-1-0 ; Williams 
Charles E.. 0-10-0-0 ; Williams. Jack A., 0-4-2-0 ; Williams 
James H., 1-9-4-5 ; Williams, Paul W., 21-12-2-0 ; Williams 
Roger, 15-30-4-0 ; Williams. Tom M.. 24-24-1-0 ; Williams. Willie 
H., 0-3-0-0 ; Wilson. H. G.. 1-3-0-0 ; Winchester. Roy L.. 21-15- 
6-1 ; Winfrey. Shelby. 39-15-1-5 ; Wingfield, Felix G., 0-0-3-4 ; 
Wirtz. Howard, 7-13-2-0 ; Wirtz, Leonard F.. 6-2-0-0 ; Wise, 
Billy v.. 32-26-1-2 ; Wiue. Jack. 49-21-1-2 ; Witherspoon. Thom- 
as B.. 0-6-4-0 ; Withrow. Roy D.. 1-0-0-0 ; Wood. James W.. 0-0- 
1-0 ; Woodard. J. William. 2-3-1-0 ; Woods, Carl. 0-1-0-0 ; Woods. 
Gene, 5-21-6-1 ; Woodward, Billy, 8-15-0-1 ; Woodward. Danny 
H., 1-0-2-1 ; Wright, Ben H., 0-1-0-0 ; Wright. Billy J.. 2-8-1-1 
Wright, H. W.. Jr.. 0-2-0-0; Wright. Paul. 0-3-1-0; Wright 
Raleigh. 0-1-0-0 ; Wurtz. Emil. 0-0-0-1 ; Wyatt. William J 
0-0-1-1 ; 

Yancey. William Thomas. 2-1-0-0 ; Yates. Howard. 4-1-0-1 
Yeary. Bill. 1-0-0-0 ; Yates. Virgil. 3-7-0-1 ; Yelton. Gene B.. 0. 
1-1-0; Yessin. Humzey, 15-1-1-1; Zachem. Vincent, 30-29-0-3 
Zacherj', Bobby Gene. 0-0-2-1. 



PERFECTION IN PRINCIPALS 

Some of my best friends are school principals. I 
enjoy being with tiiem. 

Here are some odd conclusions I heard at one of 
their conferences. 

If principals work hard, they are eager beavers. 
If they relax a minute, they're loafers. 

If principals work well with parents, theyte 
politicians. If they don't, they're dictators. 

If principals love children, they're sentimentalists. 
If they ai'e strict, they're insensitive brutes. 

If principals try to change things in their 
schools, they're nasty "progressives." If they cling 
to the tried and true they're stick-in-the-muds. 

If principals visit the classes in their schools, 
they're snoopers spying on teachers. If they don't 
they're lazy and unworthy of their jobs. 

If principals stay at their desks to get their 
paper work done, they're officebound nincompoops. 
If they circulate around the school, they're poor 
managers. 

If principals back up their teachers, they're pup- 
pets, dancing when their faculties pull the strings. 
If they don't, they are blankety-blankety-blankety- 
blanks! 

Get the idea? You and I would not agree, of 
course. We know principals deal with many people. 
We're sure they will never please everybody. Criti- 
cism is part of their job. It is something to shrug 
off. The principals I know are wonderful men and 
women. They are doing a good work in a tricky 
assignment. Thank you, principals, thank you very 
much ! — Anonymous. 

—The MSSPA Bugle 



SUTCUFFE IS KEAPy 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic equiptnent for the fall season 



Now we can give you immediate delivery. No Delay ! No Waiting ! 
Stock merchandise can be shipped on the very day your order is 
received. 




QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally-distributed, nationally- 
advertised prefen-ed quality brands. 



, « SUTCLIFFE'S SERVICE 

\ if<!^ ^^^ on-the-spot service, the Sutcliffe School repre- 
^^ sentative will contact you, as usual, during the year, 

Write us about your needs. Remember we give one- 
day service. 



SUTCLIFFE CATALOGUE— If you have not received your copy of 
our 1963 Catalog, please drop us a card and we shall send you one 
promptly. You will be quick to appreciate the top-flight athletic 
items from which you may select your Fall equipment. 




THE Sutcliffe CO, 

INCORPORATED 

225 SO. FOURTH ST., LOUISVILLE. KY. 



FAIR -PLAY 
OUT IN FRONT FOR OVER 25 YEARS 

FAIR - PLAY 
FF-IS FIGURSRAM BOARD 

Here's the world's most popular basketball scoreboard— the 
PF-IS — with famons TICK-AWAT flashins nameral clock orig- 
inated by Fair-Play. Shows exact namber of minutes and sec- 
onds remaining in game. Accurate, dependable, and easily 
serviced. 

Sturdy, all-aluminum alloy cabinet, fully enclosed with no 
exposed wiring. Non-glare, baked enamel finish. Choice of 
colors: gray, red, green, blue and black with white lettering. 

IN STOCK 

We carry the Fisnargrram basketball boards in stock for immed- 
iate delivery. Boards for other sports also available. Any 
board can be made special to order. 



Model Description Lbs. 

FF-iS— Single Face Tickaway with 9 inch numerals 125 ! 

FF lS-12 — Single Face Tickaway with 12 inch numerals 150 

FF-IS-PF— Deluxe Tickaway with Player Name and Foul Panels 500 

(Add $72.00 if FF-IS is to have 12 inch numerals.) 

FF-2S — Double Face Tickaway with 9 inch numerals 250 

FF-2S-12— Double Face Tickaway with 12 inch numerals 300 

MULTIPLE INSTALLATIONS: When 2 or more boards are installed 
to be operated together, the price is the same as 2 or more single boards, 
liss $30.00 if scorf boards are bought at the same time. 

No. 12PRL LINEUP PANELS lowerable and reversible with players nan- — 
and numbers for 4 teams and next game panel. Numbers, letters, 
lowering system furnished 

No. 12PF PLAYER FOUL PANELS— Shows 5 fouls for 12 players 

each tram, per Hair 

FPW FOUL INDICATOR or MATCH SCORE WRESTLING 

ATTACHMENT with control panel 



Price 
I 498.00 

570.00 
1,258.00 

899.00 
999.00 



$165.00 
$595.00 
$195.00 



FB-50-A2 FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD 

This is THE scoreboard for high school or college football— 
the moat popular football scoreboard made and the standard 
for fields and stadiums from Maine to California. 
This big FB-50-A2 is 18 feet long, 8 feet high, weight 600 
pounds. It's durable, too; an all-aluminum cabinet, fully en- 
closed for protection against weather, dust, vandalism. Beauti- 
ifnlly finished in white, forest green or signal black (special 
colors on request at extra cost). 

Big 24-inch flashing numerals show TIME, SCORE, PERIOD. 
DOWN and YARDS TO GO. Tickaway Clock shows the exact 
number of minutes and seconds left to play. 



Model 



Description 



Lbs. 



Both Day 

& Nifilht 

$1,565.00 

1,650.00 

1,050.00 



Night Only 
Day Only 

FB-50-A2— 18 ft. X 7 ft. 2 inches— with 24-inch numbers 675 $1,485.00 

FB-50-S— 24 ft. X 8% ft.— with 24-inch numbers 750 1,570.00 

FB-50-T— 18 ft X 4 ft.— Top Section Only 500 995.00 

INSTALLATION EQUIPMENT 
CONTROL CABLE: From board to sideline and /or press box, 

19 conductor (for either underground or overhead installation) per foot .55 

Sideline DOWN & YARDS TO GO portable cable, per foot .20 

Sideline TIMERS portable cable, includes hand switch, per foot .20 

CONTROL RECEPTACLES AND BOX: (Minimum of one required) 

1. Press Box Type $20.00 

2. Sideline type (raintight with hasp) $25.00 

A Bpedal panel for Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, Dr. Pepper, Ford, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile or any special desiffn 

can bo daplicated at an extra cost to fit on the bottom of either type board. 

All Fair Play boards carry a one-year guarantee. We have all necessary repair parts in stock and 

alao maintain an experienced service man. 

Take advaatare of the present day prices and place your order now for at once or fntnre delivery. 

Ail prices nibject to change without notice. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 



CHapel 7-194! 



(Incorporated) 



MAYFIELD. KENTUCKY 



MESSENGER JOB PRINTING CO., INC.— OWENSBORO, KY. 









K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 




Above are area representatives who attended the School for Football Officials, held in Lexington on 
Auffnst 9-10. They are: (Left to Right) Front Row: E. B. May, Jr., Prestonsburg ; Gene Cathey, 
Murray; Kean Jenkins, Elizabethtown ; Bernard Johnson, Lexington; Gordon Reed, Fort Thomas. Second 
Row : Bill Womack, Henderson ; Joe Russell, Russellville ; Sam Gruneisen, Louisville ; Ed Nord Louis- 
ville; Charles Black, Barbourville; Bill Mordica, Ashland; School Director Edgar McNabb, Fort Mitchell. 



Official Organ of tiie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

September, 1963 



NATIONAL 
ALLIANCE 



FOOTBALL OFFICIALS' SIGNALS 



Iltj'sS Offside or viola- 
\z/ tion of free-kick 
rules 



J Foul Signals 1 to 1 6^ 



/A , ^^ 





2 © 3 



IL 



Illegal position 

or procedure 

Illegal forward 

handing 

Procedure Signals A to H 



&^ 



Illegal motion or shift 

Both hands for illegal 

shift 



y Delay of game 
Crawling 
Encroachment 



4\ 




Pushing, 

helping runner or 
interlocked interference 



15 



^Touchdown or 
field goal 

Wit 



r. 



If 

\\,~.':\ Ball is dead 
t'^' / ^°^ touchback 

\!^yL wave sidewise 

^"^W-i^^N ready for play 

* i £1 m 

First down 
For first touching 
of a kick, point to 
spot _ 

) 1^ Time out 
Clock ,.,^'M-, Z' ■■ 

\_ -^ Officials time out— follows 



Illegally kicking 
or batting a 
loose ball 




Clipping 



Incomplete forward . ,, 
pass — penalty declined — ! ^ 
no play or no score \ „ , 

Safety 






Grasping opponents face 
protector 



Ineligible 
receiver down 
field on pass 



signal D 




Interference with 
fair catch or 
forward pass 



12 JJ^ 

Illegal forward 
pass 




Unsportsmanlike conduct 
Delay start of half 
Illegal participation 



lO 






Illegal use 
hand or arm 



Of \-^v->£i 

m ^-— ^/.,-i 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1963 



LOO Per Year 



K. H. S. A .A. LEADERS 




Cecil A. Thornton 

President 



Oran C. Teater 
Vice-President 



Cecil A. Thornton, Assistant Superin- 
tendent of the Harlan County Schools and 
K. H. S. A. A. Board of Control member for 
the past seven years, was elected President 
of the Board at the summer meeting of the 
directors, held on July 27. Supt. Oran C. 
Teater of the Paintsville City Schools was 
elected Board Vice-President. The two men 
represent respectively Sections 7 and 8. 

The new president is a graduate of Union 
College, and he is currently a member of 
the Alumni Association Board of that in- 
stitution. He attended the University of 
Kentucky where he received his M.A. degree 
in Education Administration. He is married 
to the former Gertrude Cawood. They have 
one son, Fred Lee, who is in college. 

Mr. Thornton lettered in high school 
and college major sports, and officiated in 
football and basketball for several years. He 
taught Science and Physical Education, and 
served as assistant coach for three years at 
the Evarts High School. His educational ex- 
perience also includes service as assistant 
high school principal, pupil personnel dir- 
ector, and supervisor. Mr. Thornton is an 
active member of the Harlan Methodist 
Church, where he served for five years as 
ch-'irman of the Board of Stewards. For a 
long period of time he has taught the Senior 
Men's Bible class. He has for many years 



participated in Boy Scout work and has 
served for over sixteen years on the Harlan 
County 4-H Club Council. He is a member 
of the Harlan County Association of Social 
Agencies. He holds membership in education- 
al associations at all levels. 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater, who has 
been a Board member for the past three 
years, is a graduate of Centre College and 
has a M.A. degree from Morehead State 
College. He competed in all major sports at 
Centre. In his senior year, he coached the line 
at Danville High School, which won the 
Central Kentucky Conference football title. 

In the years that followed his college 
graduation, Mr. Teater returned to Paints- 
ville High School, his alma mater, to coach 
the Tigers to three Big Sandy Conference 
titles in five years. His over-all football 
record was -34-11-3. His basketball teams 
won 64, lost 13. His baseball team won three 
state district titles. Largely through his 
efforts the present four-sport, ten-team 
Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference was 
formed in 1952. In the late forties, when he 
was President of the Old Big Sandy Con- 
ference for three terms, he felt that many 
of the schools in Eastern Kentucky strongly 
overemphasized one sport. He was instru- 
mental in spearheading a successful drive 
for a new four-sport league that required 
participation in football, baseball, basketball 
and track. He headed the league in its 
early days. In 1950 Mr. Teater was elevated 
to the princip^lship of the Paintsville High 
School, a position he held until he assumed 
the superintendency of Paintsville City 
Schools in 1959. 

Aside from his school duties the new 
Board vice-president is active in local affairs 
and state organizations. He is a member of 
the Masons, Christian Church (deacon). 
Shrine, and the Paintsville Kiwanis Club 
(past president) ; and hps served two terms 
on the Centre College Board of Overseers. 
He is a member of six other school frater- 
nities, honorary and social. He is currently 
President of the E. K. E. A. Superintendents 
organization, and a member of the K. E. A. 
Planning Board. His wi^e is the former 
Mary Evelyn VanHoose of Paintsville. They 
have one daughter, Dianna Louise, who is in 
college. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



September 1963 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 2 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hiffh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky, 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66). Horse Cave: Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville: 
Preston Holland (1961-65): Murray; Don R. Raw'ings (1961-65), 
Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962-66). Louisville.'' 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

Jtiom the Commissionei s Office 

Basketball Clinics 

The 1963-64 rules meetings for regist8re(i basket- 
ball officials and coaches will be conducted by veteran 
clinic director Charlie Vettiner. The dates and sites of 
the meetings are as follows: 

September 29, Elizabethtown High School, 1:30 P.M. 

September 29, W.K.S.C, Bowling Green, 7:00 P.M. 

September 30, Christian Co. High School, Hopkins- 
ville, 1:30 P.M. 

September 30, Tilghman High School, Paducah, 7:00 
P.M. 

October 1, Henderson High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 1, Beaver Dam High School, 7:00 P.M. 

October 6, Somerset High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 6, Bell County High School, Pineville, 7:00 
P.M. 

October 7, Hazard High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 7, Pikeville High School, 7:00 P.M. 

October 8, Morehead State College, 1:30 P.M. 

October 8, Ky. Power Company, Ashland, 7:00 P.M. 

October 9, Newport High School, 7:00 P.M. 

October 10, Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 7:00 P.M. 

October 13, University High School, Lexington, 7:00 
P.M. 

Football Examination 
Part II of the National Federation Football Ex- 
amination for officials will be given in Kentucky on 
Monday, September 30. An official who has been 
registered for at least one year prior to the cuiTent 
season is eligible to take the examination and work 
for a higher rating. Officials who hold the "approved" 
rating in football are required to make a minimum 
percentage grade of 80 in order to maintain this 
rating from year to year. Officials who hold the 
"certified" rating keep this rating by attending one 
or more clinics each year. Eligible officials who wish 
to take the test should write the State Office. 
Use of Registered Officials 
A list of registered football officials appears in 
this issue of the ATHLETE. Principals and coaches 
should study the current list to determine whether or 
not all officials with whom contracts have been sign- 
ed have registered this fall. Supplementary lists of 
officials will appear in subsequent issues of the 
magazine. By-Law 22 provides that member schools 
shall use registered officials in all football and 
basketball games, and that failure to comply with this 
regulation makes the home school liable for suspen- 
sion. If there is any question about registration, the 



official should be asked to present his card. 
Football District Changes 

To be added to the list of football schools printed 
in the August issue of the ATHLETE are the follow- 
ing: Henry County^Cla.ss AA, Region II, District 1; 
Fulton County-Class A, Region I, District 1; Owen 
County-Class A, Region II, District 2. Removed from 
the list should be the names of Buckhom and DUce 
Combs (Class A, Region IV, District 2). These 
schools will not field football teams during the forth- 
coming season. 

School for Basketball Officials 

The Fifteenth Annual School for Basketball Of- 
ficials was held at the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on 
August 11-12, 1963. Basketball Clinic Director 
Charlie Vettiner directed the school. 

The aim of the school was uniformity in officiat- 
ing. Topics which were discussed during the three 
sessions were: rules changes and interpretations; 
general study of the i-ules; a signal drill to secure 
uniform signaling of violaticms, fouls, etc.; floor 
technique on jump balls, fouls, and field goals; how to 
dofermine primary responsibility in charging and 
blocking situaitions; post play, screens, guarding the 
dribbler, switching, no action game, a study of the 
floor, throw-ins, three circles, foul lanes, and the 
twenty basketball fundamentals. 

The services of the regional representatives who 
attended the school will be available to Association 
member schools throughout the forthcoming basket- 
ball season. The men will conduct additional clinics 
for officials, coaches, and players, and will assist 
beginning officials in legistration. 

1963-64 Insurance Subsidy 

As reported in the Board of Control meeting min- 
utes which appeared in the May issue of the ATH- 
LETE, the Board voted in its April meeting that the 
insurance subsidy of each Kentucky member school in 
1963-64 shall be the basic amount of $40.00, with an 
additional subsidy of $60.00 few schools maintaining 
football. School administrators wishing to take ad- 
vantage of the subsidy may write to the State Office 
for reimbursement forms. Some of the companies 
with which Kentucky schools place their insurance 
business give the schools credit for the amounts due 
and bill the Association for these amounts. The re- 
imbursement plan and the credit plan are both satis- 
factory. 



Attention, Officials! 

The attention of all registered K-H^S.A.A. foot- 
ball and basketball officials is called to By-Law 29, 
Section 9, which provides that the oficial shall be 
supplied with an emblem which he shall wear on his 
shirt or sweater. This rule in 1963-64 will be strictly 
enforced. The emblem is to be worn on the left 
shoulder shirt sleeve, approximately one and one-half 
inches below the shoulder seam. Failure to wear the 
emblem will make an official liable for suspension 
from the Officials' Division of the Association. 

Recommended unifonns are as follows: 

Football — ^black and white striped shirt (long or 
short sleeves), black baseball cap with white piping, 
w:hite knee pants, black belt, black stockings, black 
shoes and laces; 

Basketball — ^black and white striped shirt (short 
sleeves, long sleeves by special permission), black 
trousers, black belt, black shoes and laces. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



Page Three 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Cooitrol of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at Kenlake Hotel, Kentucky 
Lake State Park, on Saturday morning, July 27, 19^3. 
The meeting was oalied to order by retiring President 
K. G. GiUaispie at 9:00, with Board members, Don 
Davis, Ralph C. Dorssy, Sherman Gish, Preston Hol- 
land, Don R. Rawlings, Oran C. Teater, and Cecil A. 
Thomiton; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and As- 
sistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Don Davis, 
that the reading of the minutes of the AprU 19th 
meeting be waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried umanimously. 

Mr. Gillaspie stated that the next order of busi- 
ness was the election of ths president and vice- 
president of the Board of Control. Oran C. Teater 
nominated Cecil A. Thornton for the preisidency of 
the Board of Control. Preston Holland moved, second- 
ed by Doin Davis, that the nominations cease, and 
that Mr. Thomiton be elected by acclamation. The 
motion was carried, with Mr. Thornton not voting. 

Don R. Rawlings nominated Oran C. Teater for 
the Board Vice-Presidency. Don Davis moved, second- 
ed by Ralph C. Dorsey, that the nominations cease 
and that Mr. Teater be elected by acclamation. The 
motion was carried, with Mr. Teater not voting. 

Preston Holland stated that the outgoing officers 
had seized the Association well, and were to be com- 
plimented on their work. Sherman Gish echoed these 
sentiments, as did other members of the Board. Mr. 
Gillaspie, the one retiring Board member, responded 
with statements concerning his pleasui'e at having the 
opportunity to serve the K.H.S.A.A. for eight years 
and to work with the various directors with whom he 
had been associated during that time. President 
Thornton welcomed to the Board Assistant Superin- 
tendent Don Davis of the Kenton County Schools. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board 
on the receipts and disbursements of the K.H.S.A.A. 
during the year 1962-C3. Copies of the audit, recently 
prepared by Johnson and Lusk of Louisville, Certi- 
fied Public Accountants, had been mailed to members 
of the Board. Total funds on hand June 30, 1963, 
were reported as being $139,052.80. The Commission- 
er stated that the complete bieakdown on receipts 
and expenses appearing in the audit, would be print- 
ed in a forthcoming issue of the magazine. Oran C. 
Teater moved, seconded by Preston Holland, that the 
audit report of the Commissioner be accepted. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented a suggested K.H.S. 
A.A. budget for the 1963-64 school year, with esti- 
mated receipts of $125,700.00, and estimated dis- 
bursements o£ $128,775.00. Sherman Gish moved, 
seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, that the 1963-64 K.H. 
S.A.A. budget be adopted as presented by the Com- 
missiomer. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey, sp-eaking for the Calendar Com- 
mittee, reported to the Board that his Committee 
had made several changes in the 1963-64 calendar of 
athletic activities, compared with previous calendars, 
en'ieavoring to schedule more spring district, regional, 
and state tournaments and meets on weekends and 
later in the school year in line with recommenda- 
tions made by numerous school administrators 
througihooit the starte. 

Sherman Gisih gave a report on the recent Na- 
tional F-'derajtion Annual Meeting, held at the Lake 
Placid Cliuib, New York State. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Don R. Raw- 
lings. that the fall meeting of the Board of Control 
be held in Lexington on September 28. The motion 



was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the expenses of 
conducting the K.H.S.A.A. swimming program con- 
tinued each year to be considerably in excess of the 
budgeted item. He stated that the State Swimming 
Committee to date had been unable to set up regional 
meets in swimming, with qualifying swimmers from 
these meets advancing to the state finals and hav- 
ing their expenses paid as is true in the other sports 
sponsored by the Association. Don Davis moved, sec- 
onded by Sherman Gish, that the expenses of swim- 
mers representing their schools in the state meets 
for Class A boys. Class B boys, and girls, be reim- 
bursed on a fifty percent basis. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that out-of-season 
basketball and football scrimmages and games ap- 
pear to be on the increase in Kentucky. Members of 
the Board asked the Commissioner to give his in- 
terpretation of Association regulations with respect 
to possible violations of these regulations by mem- 
ber school principals allowing their athletes to take 
part in these contests. The Commissioner stated that 
the football season is defined as being on the open- 
ing date of school and ending with the playing of 
the last regularly scheduled g"ame, and the basket- 
ball season is defined as beginning on the opening 
date of school and ending on the final day of the 
State Tournament. He further stated that all out-of- 
season games should be considered post-season games, 
that out-of-season scrimmages bstween teams rep- 
resenting K.H.S.A.A. member schools should be con- 
sidered games, and that only the Board of Control 
has the authority to sanction out-of-season games 
and scrhnmiages. He said that this interpretation 
would probably result in a tightening of the Board 
of Control sanction policy, and he asked for an opinion 
from each Board member concerning whether or not 
this interpretation should be established. It was the 
opinion of the Board members that this rules in- 
terpretation by the Commissioner was 'entirely cor- 
rect. Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Sherman 
Gish, that the Board adopt a policy in line with the 
interpretation concerning out-of-season football and 
basketball contests given by the Commissioner, and 
that the administrators of K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
be notified immediately concerning this policy in 
order that the information mig'ht be passed on to 
their football and basketball coaches. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that certain members 
of the Shelby County High School and Henry County 
High School basketball squads had engaged in a 
scrimmage on July 5, 1963, and it was his opinion 
that the boys involved had engaged in a non-sanction- 
ed post-season basketball game, thus making them- 
selves ineligible for high school competition. It was 
the opinion of the Board members that the players 
had made themselves ineligible by taking part in the 
practice sesision mentioned. The Commissioner stated 
that he did not believe that the principals or coaches 
of the two schools involved were in any way attempt- 
ing to break the rules of the K.H.S.A.A. It was his 
opinion that they had misinterpreted Association 
regulations and previous Board policy. He recommend- 
ed that the eligibility of the Shelby County Higih 
School and Heni-y County High School players in- 
volved in the basketball practice session conducted on 
July 5, 1963, be restored by the Board, under author- 
ity given the Board in Article IV, Section 3-d-7, of 
the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution. Sherman Gish moved, 
seconded by Don Davis, that the eligibility of the 
Shelby County and Henry County players be restor- 
( Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

In last month's ATHLETE the Dutch- 
man told of a fascinating game being played 
in Canada called "Bowling on the Green." At 
the time, your Dutch Recreation enthusiast 
offered to pass on information about this 
sport to other Kentuckians after returning 
from his Canadian study trip. 

In Bowling Green, Kentucky, a College 
President opened his August copy of the 
KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE 
and the wheels of his fine imagination start- 
ed to turn. Dr. Kelly Thompson saw the 
possibilities of "Bowling on the Green" in 
the City of Bowling Green. When the Dutch- 
man was a student at Western Kentucky 
State College, he was an ardent admirer of 
President H. H. Cherry who possessed an 
imagination so keen that few thought that 
there would ever be another "on the hill" 
who could dream like him and make realities 
out of his visions. 

Kelly Thompson can and does. He "out- 
cherries Cherry." 

This progressive College President, whose 
imagination has brought undreamed of prog- 
ress to the College on Bowling Green's high- 
est hill, realized immediately that here is a 
brand new sport which Kentuckians, ages 
nine through ninety may enjoy — and his 
town, like that of Bowling Green, Ohio, got 
its name from the sport. So there should be 
"Bowling on the Green" in Bowling Green! 
Now Kelly is studying the possibility of an- 
other "first" in the introduction of the sport 
on an area close to the fabulous new build- 
ing on Western's Campus which houses the 
E. A. Diddle Arena. 

Prestonburg's E. B. May was the only 
Freshman in attendance at the Fifteenth 
Annual School for Basketball Officials in 
Lexington on August 11 and 12, 1963. Every- 
body missed Pikeville's Dick Looney who rep- 
resented Region 15 for fourteen consecutive 
years but all were enthusiastic about the 
work done in the officiating classes by 
"Whistler" May. Dick has passed the "torch" 
on to an able young man. 

On the subject of the training of officials 
by the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation, we point out that Edgar McNabb, 
who teaches the football officials, is pictur- 
ed in the column with the chap who does the 
same chore in Basketball. Many requests 
come to the Dutchman each year to praise 
Mac's Football Clinic work. These commenda- 
tions are richlv deserved and could not come 
to a finer Kentuckian. 

There is another great Kentuckian climb- 
ing the mountains in and around Hazard. 




Mention here is made to the "Fabuious 
Willie" Dawahare, the Mayor of the town. 

Because of his love for kids, and his work 
for them "Fabulous Willie" has been nomi- 
nated for one of Kentucky's greatest honors, 
namely "Mr. Recreation of Kentucky for 
1963." This honor, conferred annually on the 
Kentuckian who has done the most for Rec- 
reation in this State was won by Commission- 
er Ted Sanford, in 1962; 1961 Henry Ward; 
1960 Joe Mitchell; 1959 B. C. Van Arsdale; 
1958 C. W. Lampkin ; 1957 Dr. James T. Ful- 
ler; 1956 Lawrence Wetherby ; 1955 Buss 
Kirchdorfer; 1954 Don Campbell, and 1953 
L. Max Sanders. Send your nomination im- 
mediately to The Flying Dutchman, Post 
Office Box 36, Colonial Manor, Jefferson- 
town, Kentucky. 

Willie Dawahare transported 40 Hazard 
kids, many of whom had never been out of 
Perry County, to Cincinnati to see the Los 
Angeles Dodgers play the Cincinnati Red- 
legs. Besides this Willie bedded the young- 
sters down in the plush Netherland Plaza 
Hotel and gave each lad a fist full of pic- 
tures of George Washington to exchange for 
hotdogs and other "belly aches" at Coney Is- 
land after the game. The Cincinnati manage- 
ment called the occasion Hazard Day. Johnny 
Podres, Dodger Pitcher who formerly played 
for Hazard, helped Willie open the ball park 
and the City of Cincinnati to the Hazard 
youngsters. 

It is a safe prediction that, if the kids 
had looked around the ball park, they would 
have found South Portsmouth's Sid Meade 
somewhere. Sid's idea of fun is to fill a 
basket with sandwiches, chocolate bars and 
buttermilk, and get fatter and fatter as his 
beloved Redlegs entertain him like the royal- 
ty he personifies when he puts his referee's 
whistle between his teeth. 

When a fine River Recreation Area was 
developed this Summer in the middle of the 
Ohio River twelve miles North of Louisville 
in Oldham County, Mrs. Mildred Hunter of 
Belknap Beach in Prospect, Kentucky, won 
the Corncob Pipe of Honor for unselfish ser- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



Page Five 



vice. Many people helped make Belle Island 
Park become a reality but this lady stands 
out because she opened her home for tem- 
porary offices for the Dutchman's Recrea- 
tion Supervisors, and gave of her time and 
effort to help make a dream of a "Boaters 
Paradise" come true. This gal is terrific ! 

The Basketball Clinics start this month. 
Check the schedule in this ATHLETE so you 
are correct as to time and place. The times 
listed coincide with the time zone in which 
the Clinic town is located. 

BE SURE TO BRING ALL SCORERS 
AND TIMERS TO THIS YEAR'S CLINIC, 
AND BE SURE THAT EVERY BASKET- 
BALL OFFICIAL WEARS HIS REFEREES 
EMBLEM. 



Registered Football Officials 
of the K. H. S. A. A.-1963 

If the telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Abele, George, 530 Sayre, Lexington. 254-6288, 252-9965 
Adkins, Wendell L., WallinG Creek, MO 4-3544, MO 4-3444 
Allen, Charles E., 4236 Lynnbrook Dr.. Louisville 20, 451-0463 
Alston, Rev. E. Deedom, 1016 South 43rd Street, Louisville, 

SP 2-1092, JU 7-6129 
Anders, Raleigh A., Route No. 5, Box 73A, London, 864-5945, 

864-5877 
Anderson, E. W., Jr., 504 Highland, Mayfield. 247-1794, 247- 

1537 
Atkinson, Charlie, 2044 Georgian Way, Lexington, 277-8586, 

252-2626 
Attick, W. E.„ 8504 Shirley Lane, Pleasure Ridge Park 921- 

3421 
Autore, Daniel, Box 172. Wheelwright, 2362 
Barbour, Morris, H.. 440 Wilberforce Coul't. Louisville 
Barlow, Billy B., Box 214. Millersburg 

Barrett, Robert D., 6228 Highland Drive. Huntington, W. Va. 
Bartels, John, 423 Third, Dayton, 581-4250 
Baughn, E. L., 1403 Johnson, Murray, 753-5799, 395-4186 
Beach, Harold, 3007 Fourth Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Beck, C. Norman, 2588 Filson Ave., Louisville, ME 4-1737, 

JU 2-3511 Ext. 352 
Beheler, Donald S., 311 Spring Hill Drive. Paris, 987-1728 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 South 41ut St., Louisville, 778-7792, 

582-5569 
Bennett, Howard, Route No. 6. Mayfield, CH 7-3309, CH 7-3513 
Bero, James J.. Box 968. Williamson. W. Va. 
Blackburn, Adrian, 407 Scott Ct., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2401 
Blackburn, Tennyson Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blacketor, Dr. Paul G., 422 North Main St., Barbourville, 546. 

3073 
Blanton, Homer. 138 New Hampshire Drive, Ashland. 324- 

1730, 324-3730 
Blosser. Kermit A.. 80 Maplewood Dr., Athens, Ohio, LY 2- 

2792, LY 3-1011 Ext. 207 
Bocook, Earl, 1102 Beech St., Kenova. W. Va. 
Bocook, George Allen, We Walnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Boeh, Bill, 3804 McNicholas, Deer Park, Ohio, 791-8880. 761- 

1876 
Boemker, Bob, 69 Thompson, South Fort Mitchell, 331-1708, 

721-2700 Ext. 350 
Boesken, F. William. 318 McClelland Ave., St. Bernard 17. 

Ohio. AV 1-6209. 281-20i06 
Bond. Jack C, 2057 Clays Mill Road. Lexington, 277-2351, 

252-2250 Ext. 3215 
Bordy. Philip, 3308 Stratford, Louisville, GL 8-7005, 582-3994 
Bostick, Lord M., Jr.. 419 West 12th St., Bowling Green. 

VI 3-3319, VI 3-6573 
Bowman, E. G. "Dick", 687 Mt. Vernon, Lexington, 266-8111, 

262-3343 
Boyles, Jerry F., 2700 Algonquin, Ashland, 324-6995, 324-1111 
Brandenburg, Donald E., 714 Exeter Ave.. Middlesboro. 1139 
Brawner, Robert Allen, 282 Longview Drive, Bowling Green, 

843-6548 
Brewer. Clyde U., 416 East Coy Circle, Clarkisville, Tenn., 

647-6222, Ft. Campbell 3309 
Brichler. Joe A., 6737 Kiefer Court, Cincinnati, Ohio. 541- 

6049, 721-1984 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louiuville 5, 624-6843, 

689-9111 



Brotzge, Maurice J.. 3800 West Broadway, Louisville, TW 

3-7206. SP 6-2506 
Brown. Bill. 1726 Quarry Hill Road, Louisville, GL 8-4857, 

JU 4-3564 
Brown, Herman G.. Route 2. Shelbyville. 633-1692. 633-2663 
Brown, Richard G., 8 Lacy Lane, Clarksville, Tenn.. 647-5965 
Bullock. Teddy. 148 North Arcadia. Lexington. 254-4200 
Bunn, Gary L., 2718 First Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Burke. Daniel F., 1115 Maureen, Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-9631, 

621-7411 
Burke, Harry R.. 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, 

TU 6-2385 
Burton, James E., 401 Barbour St.. Providence. 667-2296, 667- 

5360 
Burton, John, 533 28th St., Ashland, 324-5964, 4-1111 Ext. 349 
Cain, Paul D.. 3196 Lookout Cr. Cincinnati 8. Ohio, 321-7246, 

281-9740 
Caldwell, Charles M., 2790 Latulla Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Caiman. E. C. Jr.. 1124 Washington. Sturgis. 333-4655, 333- 

5646 
Canady. Ray B., 227 Sycamore, Box 176, Barbourville, 546- 

3601 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, GL 1-8218, 587- 

8862 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington, Paducah, 444-7943, 444- 

6311 Ext. 407 
Carrico. John. 3831 Chatham Road, Louisville, 458-4007, 582- 

4625 
Carroll, Jamoi L., Lincoln Ave.. Paintsville. 789-3601. 789- 

4067 
Cecil, A. Morris, 14 Shaw Lane, Fort Thomas, 441-8427, 381- 

1480 
Chattin, Ernie, 2147 Central Ave.. Ashland. 324-2665, 324-6191 
Chinn, Ralph, 3205 Hampton St., Ashland, 324-0683 
Clark, Bill W., 4605 Buckner Lane, Paducah, 442-3205, 444- 

6311, Ext. 592 
Clark, Maxie B.. 165 Avon Ave., Lexington, 254-9301, 252- 

0410 
Clemmons, Sam P.. 636 Central Ave., Lexington, 256-3562, 

262-042-1 
Clinard, Fred L.. 2227 Craigmeade Circle. Nashville, Tenn., 

883-0240. AL 6-7236 
Clusky. Joe, Red Jacket, W. Va. 

Cochran, Roy H.. Jr.. 305 Gordon, Corbin, 2478, 864-4330 
Cook, Jack W., 166 So. Edgemont Rd.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Cook, Walter E., SFC, 6012 A Gorgas Ave., Ft. Campbell, 

4472. 3408 
Corea. Frank, Box 452, Williamson, W. Va. 
Cowan. Robert L., 604 E. Master St., N. E., Box 561, Corbin, 

3332, 256 
Grace, James, 892 Orchard Park Rd., Hurricane, W. Va. 
Craft. Albert B.. 345 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 254-6366, 256- 

0960 
Craft, Bill. 140 Vanderbilt. Lexington, 277-4843, 277-3737 
Crager, Bobby F., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2131 
Creasey, Fred, 204 W. Washington. Sebree 
Criniti. Frank, 848 Chappell Road. Charleston, W. Va. 
Crosthwaite. John S., Jr.. 8139 Elbow Lane No., St. Peters- 
burg. Florida. 344-7661. 898-2141 
Crum. Edward E., 2136 East Lane, Loui«ville, EM 8-8197, 

ME 7-7621 E.xt. 203 
Cubbon, George C, 803 Townsend Drive, Charleston, W. Va. 
Cullen. Charles E., 3010 Don Dee Drive, Louisville 20, 451- 

3322, 582-8285 
Gulp, Willard E., Box 2402. Clarks"ille. Tenn., 647-5002, 439- 

4313 
Curnutte, James, 201 East 8th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Current. Ellis Ray. 1933 Bellefonte Drive. Lexington, 277- 

1049, 265-4660 
Dahlander, Ward M.. 507 Indian Ridge Road. Louisville V, 

TW 5-6273. JU 5-2356 
Dallmann. James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, Ind., BU 

Daniel Erntut H.. 2317 Bath Ave., Ashland, 324-2785, 324-1155 
Daum, Charles, 216 Christ Rd., Evansville, Indiana, HA 4-0217, 

HA 2-8805 . 

Davidson, Norman L., 7617 E. Manslick Road. Louisville, CE 

9-7811, ME 4-1581 
Dav'rs Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid. Ashland, 324-7804, 324-7145 
Davis, Webster C, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959, 

JU 2-3511 
Davis, William P.. 1003 8th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dean. Robert C, 7806 St. Andrews Church Rd., Louisville 
Deaton, Dan, Matewan, W. Va. 
DeMuth. Paul E., 7510 Westdale Road, Louisville, 425-2455, 

778-4421 
Denton, Charles, Route No. 3. Henderson, VA 6-4020, VA 6- 

Deutsch, T. C Jr., 1019 Lenox Place, Cincinnati, Ohio, 961- 

4366, 751-4450 
Dial, Charles R.. 3300 Monel Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Dixie Cornelius P.. 608 South Clay, Louisville 2, 687-7680 
Dizney, Alan, 206 4th St., Corbin, 154, 1796 
Doll, Louis E., 4426 Reading Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 731- 

9281, 761-4210 
Dotson, W. S., 432 East 5th, Lexington, 252-5131. 254-0350 
Downey. Robert F., 327-26th St., Dunbar. W. Va. 
Drake, Richard R.. 61 Edwards Ct., Ft. Thomas. 441-4236 
Duncan, James T., Route 2, Russellville, PA 6-2802 



Pag-e Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



Durkin. Jack, 291 Burke Drive, Lexington, 2.54-4396, 254-1714 
Durman, Mahlon, 233 Rockaway, Cincinnati 33, Ohio 
Eaytham, Everett, Jr., Route No. 1. Kenova, W. Va. 
Edelen. Ben R., 2842 Klondike Lane, Louisville, GL 4-3518, 

GL 2-2611 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College St,, Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Ellis, Johnny, Prestonsburg, 6-2751, 6-3080 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 277-3994, 

873-4901 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ernst, Edward R., Box 244. Erianger, 921-8336, 689-7181 
Fallon. Robert J., 645 North Main, Hazard, 436-4628, 436-2151 
Falls. W. M., Sr., 122 Liberty St., Hopkinsville, 886-2436, 885. 

8278 
Fandrich, William. Route No. 4. Murray, PL .3-3193 
Farley. Kenny, 530 Locomotive, Irvine, 723-2487, 723-2527 
Faust, Jack, 2427 Concord Drive, Louisville. 634-4204, 634-9475 
Fe:x, Darl W.. 407 Pleasant, Cynthiana, 234-1517 
Ferguson, Jesse S., 1519 Bluegrass Ave., Louisville, 363-5519, 

363-5519 
Ferguson. Thomas L., 922 Lee St., Barboursville. W. Va. 
Fernandez, John W., Jr., 1617 Maywick Dr.. Lexington, 277- 

8257, 252-1497 
Ferrell. Doc, 409 Greenbriar, Lexington, 277-4273. 252-4030 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomau. 441-6288, 541-1800 

Ext. 1461 
Fish, Leland G., 826 Oak Hill, Lexington, 255-7166, 266-7741 
Fletcher, John L., 5723-B Brown. Ft. Knox, 4-2079, 4-2052 
Florence, Robert H., 308 North 36th St., Paducah, 444-7489, 

444-6311 Ext. 422 
Flowers, Herschel H., USAMRL, Ft. Knox. 4-6709. 4-3937 
Forbes, J. W., Jr., 208 Granvil Drive. Louisville. GL 4-6025. 

SP 8-2731 
Fcuter, Berryman, 927 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 25.5-7783, 

252-7847 
Foster, Joe W., 821 Carneal Road, Lexington, 254-8068, 256- 

6666 
Fraley. Bill, 1604 Lee Dr., Henderson, VA 7-3232 
Franklin, James A., 3229 Holt St., Ashland 325-3934, 4-1111 

Ext. 496 
Frazer, Tom Roe, Route No. 1, Sturgis, 333-4412. 333-4672 
Freese, Oliver T., 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, LO 

1-5398, ME 1-2295 
Fruit, William E„ Box 604, Route No. 1, Henderson, VA 7-3540 
Fryrear, William P., 1564 Baldwin, Bowling Green, VI 2-0088, 

VI 2-2411 
Fugate, E. Hugh. 258 Harrod Ave., Frankfort, 223-1340, 227- 

9661 Ext. 335 
Fuller, Wilton, 533 Hill-n-Dale, Lexington. 277-5122, 277-6654 
Funkhouser, Roy A., 209 East 17, Hopkinsville, 886-1923, Ft. 

Campbell 2422 
Gammon, William H., 802 Clara St., Ashland, 324-6519, 324- 

1111 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 266-4801, 

262-0410 
Golden, Billy Joe. 568 E. Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Gour, Bob, 244 Audubon, Bowling Green, VI 3-9582, VI 2- 

r341 Ext. 241 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, 337-3331, 337-2348 
Grady. Clarence O.. 420 North Main, Marion, 965-3131 
Graham, Jim, 4505 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, 4-8169, 4-1155 

Ext. 376 
Greene, Paul Dutch, 1823 Hickman St„ Ashland, 324-9216, 

324-5161 
Grieco, Joe, 2703 Shaffer Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 661-3346 
Grooms, Stanley V., 1748 Arlington Blvd., Huntington, W. Va. 
Gruneisen, Sam J., 1101 Samuel St., Loui-jville. ME 4-9964, 

ME 4-9401 
Hadden. Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Road, Lexington, 235- 

6332, 252-7866 
Hagan, Joe, 3000 Sherbrooke Rd.. Louisville, 468-1326 
Hager, Charles R., 1028"/. 7th Ave., St, Albans, W. Va. 
Hagerman. Bart, 1912 Ashland Ave., Ashland, 325-4227, 324- 

1111 Ext. 661 
Hagy, Harold J., 715 Grant Street, Charleston, W. Va. 
Hail. Dale, 304 2nd Ave.. Chesapeake, Ohio, 7-2370, 7-2322 
Hall, Henrv N.. 106 Loch Lomond. Lexington. 256-3600 Ext. 

2605 (Bus. I 
Hanes, Edward C. 1508 Ridgecrest, Bowling Green, VI 3-3432, 

VI 2-0089 
Harden, Joseph C, Route No. 1. Hardin 
Harris, Jerry, Route No. 1. Cedar Hill. Tenn. 
Harris, John C, 761 Plainview Dr., Madisonville. TA 1-2462. 

TA 1-4078 
Hatfield. Cecil E., Box 2676, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hatfield. Gene E.. Country Club Courts. Fulton, 443-4508, 1274 
Hawkirej, Robert W., 610 Echo Lane, Madisonville, TA 1-6118, 

TA 1-2990 
Hawkins, William A., Box 203, Cedar Hill, Tenn., 2941 
Hedge, David W., 321 Mockingbird Drive, Jeffersonville, Ind., 

BU 2-2242 
Heinold, F. Thomas. 6916 Terrylynn Lane, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

542-1125 
Heinze, Frank, 204 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2436. 377- 

2481 
Heinze. John G., 39 Highland Ave., Prestonsburg, 886-2195, 

874-2110 



Heitzman, Warren E., 7291 Memory Lane, Cincinnati 39, 

Ohio. 521-7530. 761-41' Ext. 3551 
Hellard, George D.. Jr., 572 Longview Drive. Lexington 
Henderlight, Phillip Ray. 320 Linden Walk. Lexington, 254- 

3053, 254-8254 
Hendon. L. J., 106 South 12th St.. Murray, PL 3-3658, PL 

3-2825 
Hertzberger, Robert. 1310 Terrace Ave.. Evansville. Ind., HA 

4-1681. HA 5-6211 
Hicks, Lloyd, 3747 Shady Lane. North Bend. Ohio. 941-5109 
Hill. Earl F.. Route No. 6. Box 141-A, London, 864-2521, 864- 

2128 
Hofstetter. Joe. Box 2173. Williamson. W. Va. 
Hogan. Cleo C. Jr.. Box 96. Park City. 749-2267 
Holbrook. William. 2421 Forest Ave.. Ashland. 324-5860. 324- 

2144 
Holeman. D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar St., Dawson Springs, SW 

7-2302, SW 7-4241 
Hollingsworth, Ralph D., 804 South Main, Springfield. Tenn. 

384-5467. 384-5283 
Holman. S. T.. 207 2nd St., Corbin, 2752. 283 
Horton, Aldrich. Box 47. Greenville. 1646 

Huber. Carl W.. 125 North 37th St.. Louwville 12, SP 4-3387 
Huber. Jerry. 29 East Fourth St.. Covington, 681-0897, 431- 

5346 
Huiet, Fred "Whitey". 7241 Longfield. Maderia 43, Ohio, 561- 

9239, 241-4768 
Hunter. Wayne C. Route No. 1. Nicholasville. 885-4901, 885- 

5251 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244, Williamson, W. Va. 
Huston, Roderick J., 4940 Rcue Terrace, Apt. A, Ft. Knox, 

4-6742 (Bus. I 
Hynson. Fred R., 2066 St. Christopher, Lexington, 266-4285, 

254-1898 
Idol, Billy Joe. 124 Leafwood Rd., Middlesboro. 1315 
Idol. Lloyd. Jr.. 207 Oakwood Road. Middlesboro, 2014 
Jahnigen. Robert E.. 6007 Red Bank Road. Cincinnati 13. Ohio 
James. Gene. IOI51 . South 6th St.. Ironton. Ohio, JE 2-6976, 

JE 2-6224 
Jarrell, Frank W.. Box 46, Ceredo. W. Va. 
Jenkins. Kean. 210 Morningside. Elizabethtown, 765-4887, 765- 

4 6." 6 
Johnson, Bernard M., 322 Blueberry. Lexington. 277-2883 
Johnson. Harry A., Jr.. 348 Friedman Ave.. Paducah. 443- 

1767. 444-6311 Ext. 592 
Johnson. Stanley W.. 2115 Ottawa. Owensboro, 684-2167 
Jones. J. Carl, 1904 Goodwin Ave., Corbin, 110, 1506 
Jones. Paul. 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown, 765-4502, Ft. 

Knox 4-7117 
Jones. William A.. 252 North 38th St., Paducah, 443-7464, 

442-2735 
Josepbj, Michael, 2838 Washington Blvd.. Huntnigton, W. Va. 
Junker, Edwin G., 1045 West Seymour, Cincinnati, Ohio, 821- 

4117 
Kallaher, James E., 4300 Bayberry Drive, Louisville, EM 

3-2381, EM 3-2381 
Kathman, Bernard J., 3060 Elmwood Drive, So. Fort Mitchell, 

341-7369, 621-7541 
Kauffman. Victor C, 3635 West 8th St., Cincinnati 5, Ohio, 

921-9230, 661-8800 
Kelley. Capt. Victor B.. 5882-B Adams. Fort Knox. 4-1471 
Kemper, Russ, 5732 Lauderdale. Cincinnati, Ohio. 931-6222, 

621-4380 
Kercher, Norman L., 3126 Marlin Road, Louisville, GL 2-2969, 

GL 2-2969 
Kerr. Kenneth. 10806 Grafton Hall Rd., Valley Station, WE 

7-3008, 686-4000 
Kessel, Harry R., 407 Elmwood Place, Athens, Ohio, LY 3- 

4283, LY 3-4510 
Kimble, Frank, Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
King, Allen, 216 North Main, Hender»;on, VA 6-9647, VA 6- 

3321 
Klaiber. Jerry. 305 Muncy. Ashland. 4-7764, 4-6673 
Kraft, H. Nellis, 668 South 40th St.. Louisville 11, 772-9636, 

TW 6-4266 
Kraesig. Charles F.. Route No. 1. Marengo, Ind., ME 3-4842, 

Louisville, EM 6-0326 
Kratzenberg, Ralph, 2412 South 10th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532- 

5741. 632-5741 
Lambert. Irvin, 6110 Rural Way, Louisville. 969-4718. GL 8- 

1948 
Lancaster, Morris B., 204 Barberry Lane, Lexington, 265- 

0473, 266-3138 
Lange. William E., Jr., 323 Cecil. Louisville. 774-2974. EM 

Lawson. Leland. 949 Deporre. Lexington. 254-1009, 252-3044 
Lenahan. Thomas F., 3107 Doreen Way, Louisville, GL 8-4490, 

JU 2-8696 
Lewis. Horace N.. 1905 Hall Ave.. Huntington. W. Va.. JA 

9-7785 
Lewis. Jesse O. D.. Box 202. Proctorville, Ohio. 6-6890. 429- 

1381 Ext. 258 
Lewis. Maxwell L., P. O. Box 262. Kenova, W. Va. 
Lewis. Richard Q.. Jr.. 409 West 1st St.. Hopkinsville, TU 

6-4032 
Ley, Robert E., 4303-B Harper Loop, Ft. Knox, 4-6676, 4-7140 
Liber. Michael, 6601 Schwitzerhoff Road, Cincinnati 39, Ohio 
Lingo, Henry E., 604 Cedar Crajt Drive, Vine Grove, 877-2346 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOE SEPTEMBER, 1963 



Page Seven 



Logan. Eli, Jeff. 6-3003. 6-2151 

Lotz, Robert W., 106 Buttercup, Louisville. CE 9-3976, ME 

4-9491 
Lowe. Eugene T., Route No. 6, Box 28, London, 864-5724, 

864-2207 
Lowe, Stan, Box 337, Russellville, PA 6-6647, PA 6-6647 
Lucas, Gene T., lOO Lemonu Mill Rd., Georgetown, 1371, 19 
Lucas, T. L., Jr., 2128 Clinton Place E., Owensboro, MU 

4-6456, MU 3-2401 Ext. 480 
Lusby, George, Clinton St., Georgetown 

Lutz, Joseph C, 5829-B Brett, Ft. Knox. 624-3396, 4-6314 
McBrayer. Don, 516 Greenup, Raceland. 836-8857 
McCarter, . Bobby. 11 Concord Drive, Ciarksville, Tenn. 647- 

3170. 439-5211 Ext. 3320 
McCollum, Robert G.. 406 Holiday Rd., Lexington, 266-3613 
McConachie, 66.18 Halstead, Louisville, 969-9676, 896-4334 
McCowan. Connell, Route No. 1, Box 251, Corbin 2361 
McDowell. A. W., Jeffersonville, Ind., BU 3-7872, BU 2-1301 
McFadden, Jimmie, 649 Northside Dr.. Lexington, 299-1636, 

254-8983 
McGfhee, Gordon, 4529 Carroll, Covington. 261-6880 
McGiasson, Eugene, 1800 Brentmoor, Anchorage, 425-4654 
McGuire, Jack, 104 Hartwell No. 2. Louisville 
McHenry. Louis P., 4081/. Main St., Hopkinsville, TU 6-2601, 

TU 6-3386 
McKinney, Adelle E., 5370-G Fisher Ave., Ft. Knox, 4-6169, 

4-2726 
McLaughlin, Robert L., 3914 E. Gatewood Lane, Cincinnati 

36. Ohio. 793-2449. 241-1822 Ext. 293 
McLemore, Jack T.. 3234 Utah, Louisville, 366-3868, 363-2791 
McNabb, Edgar, 16 Beechwood Road, So. Ft. Mitchell, ED 

1-3113, ED 1-1220 
McNamee. Jack. 3616 Muddycreek, Cincinnati. Ohio, 922-6207 
McPeek. Talmadge, 4716 Boyd, Ashland, 324-9776 
Madon, Robert Lee, 215 Tennessee Ave., Box 47, Pineville, 

ED 7-2135, ED 7-2135 
Magruder, Earl L., Jr., 4100 Pixley Way, Louisville, WO 

9-7„45 
Makepeace, W. H., 1010 Catawba Valley, Cincinnati 26, Ohio, 

321-4042, 321-4919 
Marks, Edward W., 9068-E Young Street, Ft. Knox, 4-8678. 

4-1255 
Marsili, Lee. 1045 Gap Branch, Lynch, 848-5673 
Matarazzo, Salvatore M.. 320 N. Mulberry St., Elizabethtown, 

766-5689, Ft. Knox 4-4631 
Matthews, Billy D., 506 Boren St., Springfield, Tenn., 384- 

5550. 384-3661 
Mattingly, Charles C, 1028 Sylvia, Louisville, ME 6-3137 
May, E. B., Jr., Box 186, Prastonsburg, 886-3414, 886-8661 
Mayhew, William M., Pawnee Drive, Route No. 3, Elizabeth- 
town, 766-2706, Ft. Knox 4-7140 
Maynard, Joe E.. 809 Nesbitt Drive, Madison, Tenn., UN 8- 

9241, TW 6-6976 
Mayo, Henry L., 681 College, Paintsville, 789-3871, 789-4001 
Mays, Raymond K., 104 Samuels Ave., Barboursvilie, W. Va. 
Meeki.!. Jack, 407 6th St.. Corbin, 415, 20 
Melmige, James, Jr., Apt. No. 6, M & S Courts, South 

Williamson, W. Va. 
Mercke, Frank R., 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, TW 6-8460, ME 

4-9491 
Mercker, George E., 801 Republic Bldg., Louisville 2, GL 

1-8399, JU 2-1646 
Meyer, Bud, 6319 Lilbet Court, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 922-3459. 

721-4334 
Mickey, Elbert W., Box 2171, Williamson, W. Va. 
Middlebrooks. Chuck, 313 South Ewing, Louisville 6, 896-3665 
Miller, Kenneth H., 5406 Paquette St., Fort Knox, 4-2968, 

4-1266 
Millerhaus, W. J.. 923 Harris, Cincinnati 5, Ohio. GR 1-7904, 

WA 1-9722 
Minta, John H., 326 West Carter, Ciarksville, Ind., BU 3- 

8663, JU 2-3671 
Mitchell, Emmett, 120 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 265-3-511, 

254-0>-32 
Moellering, Louis H., 760 Burney Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, BE 

1-6693, MO 1-3510 
Moody, William R., 2032 Oleander Drive, Lexington, 277-9622, 

262-0420 
Mordica, William A., 800 Edgewood Ave., Atihland, 324-7741 
Morris, Gene L., 302 Wilson Court, Huntington, W. Va. 
Morrissey, Rockne, 4824 Harlou Drive, Dayton, Ohio, 613-254- 

4395, 513-271-0343 
Morse, Richard K., 163 North Deepwood, Radcliff, 351-3748, 

Fort Knox 4-4454 
Moss, James W., 609 Henry Clay Blvd., Lexington, 256-0772, 

265-0772 
Mouiser, H. D., Princeton Road, Madisonville, TA 1-4864, SW 

7-3481 
Mullins, B. E., Box A, Paintsville, 789-4610, 789-3680 
Muntan, Peter J., 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville, 36S-S236, 

ME 7-7621 
Murphy, Leo T., Jr., 222 McCready, Louisville, 897-2277, 458- 
Murphy, Phillip J., 4143-F Lee Village, Ft. Campbell 

2281 
Murray, Thomas, 611 Edgecliff, Covington, HE 1-1929 
Nassida, Frank R., West Oak St., Berea, 986-3446, Richmond 

623-9858 
Neal. Gene. 3648 SR 132, Route No, 1, Batavia, Ohio, 281- 

4630, 753-5908 



Nickell, Carl Duane. 2009 Broad St., Paducah, 444-6096 
Noland. Douglas, 306 Herndon, Stanford, FO 5-2609, FO 5-2619 
Noland, Robert D., 212 Berkely, Evansville. Ind., HA 2-8708. 

GL 6-1357 
Nord. Bertrand J., 4205 Naomi Drive, Louisville, 969-3369, 

JU 7-7571 
Nord, Ed., 1734 South 23rd St., Louisville, 774-1958, TW 5- 

3401 Ext. 202 
Nord, Gilbert, 6315 Krause Ave., Louisville 16, 447-3133, JU 

7-7571 Ext. 350 
Norwood, Thomas Richard. 811 Henry St., Franklin, JU 6- 

3614, JU 6-3541 
Omer, Harold G.. 150 North Crestmoor, Louisville 6, TW 6- 

4170, SP 8-4421 Ext. 206 
Osborne. Ted, Box 806, Lexington. 266-6152 
O'Nan. Norman, Elmwood Drive. Henderson, 6-9056, 7-3968 
O'Neal, William Joseph, 3628 Kelly Way, Louisville 20. GL 

8-7940, TW 5-6765 
Owens, Charles C. Jr., 2636 Guyan Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Palmer, Carl A., 209 South 5th St.. Ironton. Ohio, JE 2-8869 
Parker, Billy E., P. O. Box 731. Pineville. 337-3293 
Parsley. Clyde E., Route No. 2. Providence. 667-2524 
Pate. Lloyd W., 608 Ronnie Road, Madison, Tenn., 896-35'22, 

895-6472 
Peeno, Harry R., 30 Butler Street, Ludlow, JU 1-7336 
Pickett, Robert, 111 2nd Street, Greensburg, 932-5421. 932-6231 
Powers, Tom, 1920 Knollridge Lane, Cincinnati 31, Ohio, JA 

1-0195 
Priode. Len, P. O. Box 3031. Huntington. W. Va. 
Rapp, J. Lowell. P. O. Box 411. Athens, Ohio 
Rapp, William, 215 Heplar St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-1983 
Ray, Shirley G., 280 Wilson Downing Road, Lexington, 277- 

6991, 277-8106 
Reddington, Jim, 3824 Glenside Place, Louisville, 462-9689, SP 

8-4421 Ext. 266 
Reece, Fred, 149 Elm Street, Versailles, 873-3623, 264-6740 

Ext. 297 
Reed. Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas, 441-4946, 

641-4507 
Reinhart, Gene A., 4813 Sweetser, Evansville, Ind., GR 7-3919 
Rhoads, Arthur H., 56 Avon Place, Athens, Ohio, LY 2-8245, 

LY 3-1011 Ext. 426 
Rieman, Robert, 2004 Dallas Ave., Cincinnati 39. Ohio, 622- 

3694 
Riggins, Jason, Box 2591, Williamson, W. Va. 
Riggs, William T., 103 McEIroy St., Morganfield 
Ring. William H., 244 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 252-6511, 

256-2110 
Robinson, Don L., 1906V.' Walnut St., Kenova. W. Va. 
Rodgeiu, Tom H., 360 Caroline, Madisonville, 821-7312, 821- 

6620 
Roeckers, Bernie, 803 Loda Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 752-1140, 

831-5100 
Roettger, W. H., 2856 Hikes Lane, Louisville 18 
Rogem, J. B., 832-12th Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Rolph. Harold J., 915 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-4036, 

632-3231 
Ruddle, Guy R., 502 Meadows Hill, Dawson Springs, SW 7- 

2690 
Russell, C. B., Jr., 647 Main St., Box 228, Lynch, 848-2866 
Russell, Gary E., 1024 Book Street, Henderson, 827-1491 
Russell, Joe. Box 213, Russellville. 726-6983, 726-6983 
Russman, Godfrey F., 1041 Goss Ave., Louisville, 636-7426, 

636-7426 
Sacra, Gresham, 920 Darley Dr., Lexington, 252-6036, 299-1221 

Ext. 2244 
Sallee, Alan L., 1737 Deer Park, Louisville, GL 1-6478, 368- 

9248 
Sanders, Mel, 3910 Sunset Ave., Paducah, 442-3660, 443-5800 
Sapp, Edward, 2806 Dell Brooke, Louisville, 458-8989, 454- 

7511 Ext. 602 
Sauter. Harold S., 8608 Jenny Lind Drive, Louisville, 969- 

5381, EM 8-3381 Ext. 231 
Schad. Jim, 10717 Chelmsford Road, Cincinnati 40, Ohio, 823- 

3343 
Scharfenberger, Irv T., 8196 South Clippinger, Cincinnati 43. 

Ohio. 661-6378, 581-2122 
Schiering, Jack H., 6948 Terrylynn Lane, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

681-2272, 921-8766 
Schlich. Paul. 3315 Dean Drive, Louisville, GL 8-6765, TW 

6-0211 
Schmitt, K. F., 710 East Walnut, Louisville 
Schmitt, Paul E., 2321 West Market, Louisville, 778-5355, ME 

Schuble, Charles, 1750 Chichester, Louisville, GL 9-1774, ME 

7-8717 
Schwetschenau. Paul, 7013 Clovemoll Drive, Cincinnati 31, 

Ohio, 931-3548, 761-4100 Ext. 3833 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald Road, Lexington, 252-3316, 262- 

3595 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce Street, Murray. PL 3-4649 
Seale, Frank E.. lOOl Tates Creek Road. Lexington, 266-8545 
Seale, William E., 320 Tulane, Lexington, 277-9416, 255-3600 

Ext. 2872 
Selbee, William A., 3336 Springhaven, Catlettsburg, 324-8282, 

739-4269 
Sellier, Ed., 135 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 255-6215, 277-5122 
Sellman, John B.. 4031 Oilman Ave.. Louisville 7, 897-2757. 

JU 2-2021 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



Shanks. Thomas E., 3210 Ainslie Way, Louisville 20. 454-4203. 

582-5532 
Shaw. Earl. 121 Hagan Court. Lancaster. 792-2370, 548-2208 
Shaw. John H., 219 Eatit Lee. Mayfield. CH 7-1907 
Shaw. Stanley E., 5530 Goldcrest Drive. Cincinnati 38. Ohio, 

922-1100. 681-3510 
Sherman. Jerry. 164 East 2nd St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Shewmaker. Wayne. 20S West Meadow Drive. Clarksville. 

Tenn. 647-4112 
Showalter. John. 116 Military. Georgetown. 662. 1240 
Sloan. Wally, 419 Oread Road, Louisville, TW 5-1126, JU 3- 

0627 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville 18, 458-1286. 

366-0396 
Smith. Richard T., 2136 Clay St.. Paducah, 444-6112 
Smith. Thomas E.. 11 Polster Drive. Evansville. Ind., GR 7- 

3302 
Snyder. Gus. 2420 Adams, Ashland. 324-7927, 324-1111 Ext. 402 
South, Stanley Parks. 356 Broadway. Irvine. 723-4450 
Sparks. Lester R.. Box 681, Cumberland. 589-2286. 589-4513 
Spencer. H. Edward. 1149 Ninth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Staples. Charles L.. 1610 Lee Drive, Henderson, 827-3174, 827- 

1846 
Staten. Joseph B.. 128 Milk Drive. Louisville 16, 447-4924 
Steele, Charles. 582 Main St. Box 696. Lynch. 848-5972 
Stephens. Herbert D.. 133 l-jt St. West. Ceredo. W. Va. 
Stevens. William D.. 1033 Claiborne. Lexington, 266-2578. 299- 

1221 Ext. 32^9 
Stewart. Herbert T.. 330 Maple. Hazard. 436-2438. 436-2438 
Stone. Clifton. 2931 Oak Hill Rd., Evansville. Ind., GR 6- 

0872, HA 5-3311 
Straight. Roy 2130 Washington Ave., Huntington, W. Va., 

429-3452, 522-3056 
Strain, Richard P.. Box 47 North Trailer Park, Ft. Knox. 

4-8394. 4-4251 
Strong. Arnett. 116 Kentucky Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436- 

2141 



Sullivan, A. G., 211 Goodwin Ave.. Corbin, 2290, 9070 
Sullivan. Don Chris. 3020 Dartmouth Drive. Lexington. 277- 

6963. Frankfort 223-8221 Ext. 761 
Swinford. John. 202 South Elmarch Ave., Box 363, Cynthiana. 

234-5182. 234-2562 
Tackett. Jay. Route No. 3. Georgetown, 832-6G53 
Talbot, William G. Ill, Route No. 1, Paris, 987-2961 
Taylor. D. C, Letcher. 633-2524 (Bus.) 
Taylor. Dennis H.. 1406 Hughes. Murray. PL 3-4825, PL 3- 

5512 
Thomas, Charles. 410 East Drive. Fulton, 1948, 665 
Thomas, Frank M., 520 South 10th St., Louisville. 583-6354, 

584-9178 
Thomas. Raymond E.. 1106 Main Street, Sturgie, 333-2151, 

7-9891 
Thompson. Jack. 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville. 452-9255 
Thompson. Jack F.. Jr., 1310 Ramers Ave.. Louisville, ME 

4-3517. JU 4-5311 
Thurinan. J. W.. 210 Stratford. Richmond. 623-5428. 623-4220 

Ext. 238 
Timmering. George E., P. O. Box 92, Hopkinsville, 886-2198. 

886-1922 
ToIIey, D. E.. 283 Lafayette Parkway. Lexington. 277-7377. 

277-7577 
Trautwein. Jim. 4313 Martha. Louisville, 458-7438, 454-3449 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green, Fulton, 1056. 309 
Troutman. Bill, P. O. Box 265. Kenvir. 837-2632. 837-2632 
Trunzo. Nick. 1015 Elaine Drive. Louisville 19. 969-0559. GL 

4-7511 Ext. 3012 
Tulley, William P.. 3234 Chase Street. Huntington. W. Va. 
Tussey. George. Jr.. Route No. 1. Box 381. Ashland 324-6476 
Van Gilder. Bill. 8925 Old South Park Rd.. Louisville 19, 

969-5759. EM 1-2584 
VanHoose. Jack D.. Short St.. Paintsville. 789-4896. 789-3581 
Vankirk. Alvia S.. 107 South Poplar, Corbin. 1546. 146 
Van Meter. David G.. 3148 Tali.jman Rd.. Louisville 20, GL 

4-4030 
VanZant. Jim. Box 602, Williamson. W. Va. 

Vaughan. Richard, 2630 Jackson. Ashland. 324-5076. 324-5156 
Veneklase. Kenneth H.. 3223 Utah. Apt. No. 4, Louisville, 

366-0208, SP 8-2731 Ext. 410 
Vennari. Paul. Box 13. Beckley. W. Va.. 253-8487. 252-6911 
Vennell, Robert. 2056 Donald Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Vinciguerra. Philip. Matewan. W. Va. 
Visscher. Robert W.. 5406-C Paquette St.. Pt. Knox, 4-5107. 

4-2947 
Wagner. James L.. 3018 Dale Ann Dr.. Louiuville, GL 8-9160 
Waide, Harry D.. 250 East Arch St., Madisonville. 821-1998, 

821-3870 
Walker. Paul R., 625 Meadowlawn, Bowling Green, 843-8893, 



Wanchic. Nicholas, Route No. 6. Berea Road. Lexington, 255- 

1233. 252-8328 
Warren. Kenneth A., 45 Meadowview Drive, Louisville, GL 

4-5001, ME 4-1651 
Washer. Stanley. 135 Kingston. Apt. No. 3, Louisville 14, 

368-5678. 582-5530 
Watson. Ronald L., 313 Eastwood Dr.. Bedford, Ind. BR 

9-1876, BR 9-1605 
Watts, Shirley, 802 Carneal, Lexington. 255-2743. 252-5494 
Weaver. Clyde Ivan. P. O. Box 254, Williamson, W. Va. 
Weaver. Ray. 65 Thompson Ave., So. Fort Mitchell, 331-3761 
Weber, David, 3610 Green Meadows Dr., Apt. A-4, Louisville, 

GL 4-7620, ME 4-1561 
Welch. J. D.. 3201 Hampton St., Ashland, 324-3337, 324-1155, 

Ext. 369 
Werkowitz, Jack. 4614 Miller. Blue Ash 42. Ohio, 791-5382, 

791-5870 
WermeMter. Jack P.. 324 Penn St., Jeffersonville, Ind., BU 

3-6102, JU 3-8805 
Welch, Tom. 3932 Vine Vista Place. Cincinnati, Ohio, 281- 

8094. 421-6700 E.xt. 691 
Wells. William E.. 406 East Bridge. Cynthiana, 234-5075, 234- 

5288 
Wheeler, Mellington A., 1909 Chestnut St.. Kenova, W. Va. 
White, James, 401-C Smith Ave.. Cumberland 
Wiggington. Al. Sr.. 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, SP 6-7881 
Wilkerson. Benjamin P.. 1609 Southfield Rd., Evansville 15, 

Ind., GR 6-4560, UL 3-3381 
Willey. Harold L.. 2214 Inwood Drive. Huntington. W. Va. 
Williams. Bert O.. 963 Lucy Lane, Lexington, 254-8773, 252- 

2626 
Williams, Gene. 304 Deepwood Dr., Elizabethtown, 765-4831, 

765-4191 
Williams, Jim, 5600 Route No. 23. South Shore. YE 2-3055 

(Bus.) 
Williams, Jerry Ray, 1237 Belmar Dr.. Louisville, 368-8613, 

636-3631 Ext. 433 
Williu, Donald A.. Allen. 874-2485. 285-3407 
Wilson. John Pope, 812 East Main St.. Louisville 6. JU 5- 

4591. JU 6-4591 
Wilson. Louis O.. 728 Wellington Way. Lexington. 277-6374, 

262-1715 
Wise. Billy V.. 2112 St. Teresa, Lexington, 266-7449, 252-5494 
Wise, Jack. 408 Fountain Ave.. Georgetown. 2052, 120 
Womack, William H., 1204 Loeb St., Henderson. VA 6-4526 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 East 4th St.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-0526, 

381-1232 
Wyatt, William J., 116 Bellemeade, Lyndon, TW 5-3277 
Yanity, J. B.. Jr., 14 S. Court St., Box 61, Athens, Ohio, LY 

3-4331, LY 2-9201 
Zaranka. Benny J.. 165 St. William, Lexington, 266-6435, 

265-6666 
Zimmer, Tom, 3530 Cherry Tree Lane, Erlanger, 341-4566, 431- 

4272 



843-8326 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 
ed. The motion was carried unaniimously. 

The Commissioner reported that a basketball re- 
districting problem had developed in District 40, 
since it now appeared that there would be only three 
schools in this district for 1963-64 due to consolida- 
tion. Don Davis moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that Millersburg Military Institute be moved from 
District 37 to District 40, and that the Bryan Station 
High School be moved from District 43 to District 37. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey discussed some of the problems 
of junior high athletics in Kentucky. He stated that 
it was his opinion that at some time in the near fu- 
ture state-wide regulations for athletics in this area 
of education will be necessary. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Oram C. 
Teater, that all bills of the Association for the per- 
iod beginning April 19, 1963, and ending July 19, 
1963, be allowed. The motion was carried unanimous- 

ly. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



Page Nine 



K. H. S. A. A. 
FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS 
RULES AND REGULATIONS 
L Classification 

Sec. A. The Board of Control has divided 
the schools into three groups as follows: 

1. Class AAA includes the schools in 
Jefferson County except Aquinas, Louisville 
Country Day, and Kentucky Military Insti- 
tute. 

2. Class AA includes the schools with en- 
rollments of 327 or more in grades 10-12. 

3. Class A includes the schools with en- 
rollments of less than 327 in grades 10-12. 

Sec. B. The basis for determining the 
schools of Classes AA and A will be the total 
enrollment in grades 10-12 of a co-education- 
al school. The Board may make an upward 
enrollment adjustment for a school with less 
than a full high school course, and for 
schools enrolling boys only. 

Sec. C. Classification is for a period of 
two years. Classification for 1963 and 1964 
is based on the 1961-62 enrollment. A school 
on application of the principal to the Com- 
missioner, may be permitted to move from a 
lower into a higher classification. Any school 
placed in a higher classification must remain 
in this classification until all schools are 
classified. 

II. District and Regional Championships 

Sec. A. The state is divided into two 
regions for Class AAA and four regions each 
for Classes AA and A. Each region may be 
divided into two districts. 

Sec. B. The championship of a district, 
or a region, if there are no districts, will be 
determined by the Dickinson Rating Sys- 
tem, as adopted by the Board of Control. In 
the event of a tie under the Dickinson Sys- 
tem, the following plan will be applied for 
breaking the tie: for winning a game, ten 
points; for tying a game, five points; for 
each game won by a defeated opponent, one 
point ; for each game won by a tied opponent, 
one^half point; for each game tied by a de- 
feated opponent, one-half point; for each 
game tied by a tied opponent, one-fourth 
point. Only games played within the region 
will be counted. If a tie results after a team's 
highest points for four games have been 
counted, an additional game will be counted 
until the tie is broken. 

Sec. C. To qualify for a district or region- 
al championship, a team shall play a mini- 
mum of four games in its class within the 
region. In Region II of Class AAA, only gam- 
es played between teams in the district shall 
count toward the district championship. 

Sec. D. In any case where two teams have 



played each other more than once, the first 
game only shall count in the standings. 

III. Play-offs 

Sec. A. In Class AAA the district win- 
ners will play on Friday or Saturday two 
weeks prior to Thanksgiving. The regional 
winners will play the following weekend for 
the championship. 

Sec. B. In classes AA and A the district 
winners will play on Friday and Saturday 
two weeks prior to Thanksgiving. The fol- 
lowing weekend the winners of Region 1 and 
Region 2 will play, and the winners of Region 
3 and 4 will play. Winners of these games 
(semi-finals) will play for the championship 
of each class the following week. 

Sec. C. If a championship game results 
in a tied score, the teams will be declared co- 
champions. 

Sec. D. If a game between district win- 
ners or regional winners results in a tied 
score, the following point system will de- 
termine the winner: 1) one point for most 
penetrations of the opponent's twenty-yard 
line, 2) one point for the greater number of 
first downs, 3) one point for the greater net 
yardage. If the teams are still tied after the 
point system mentioned is applied, then the 
winner will be the team with the greater net 
yardage. The Commissioner will appoint sta- 
tisticians for each game. 

Sec. E. In Classes AAA and AA the site, 
date and starting time of the game will be 
determined by the winners of the even num- 
bered districts and regions in the even num- 
bered years. Odd numbered district and 
regional winners will determine the site, date 
and starting time of the game in odd num- 
bered years. 

In Class A the site, date and starting 
time of the game will be determined by the 
winner of the odd numbered districts and 
regions in the even numbered years. The 
even numbered district and regional winners 
will determine the site, date, and starting 
time of the game in odd numbered years. 

The site, date, and starting time of the 
final game in each class will be determined 
by the Board of Control. 

IV. Finances 

Sec. A. The proceeds of the games, ex- 
cept the finals, will be used to defray the 
expenses of the visiting team, officials, 
trophies for the district and regional win- 
ners, and other necessary expenses. 

The team transportation allowance shall 
be 50^ per mile round trip. If no agreement 
can be reached on lodging and meals ex- 
penses, actual exTjenses for these items, not 
to exceed the following maximum, shall be 
allowed: seven meals for 38 persons at $1.50 
per meal, and two nights lodging for 38 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



persons at $3.00 each. Net profit or loss shall 
be shared by the competing schools. 

Sec. B. A representative of the host 
school, designated by the principal, will man- 
age the games. The game managers shall 
agree on all matters pertaining to the game ; 
such as officials, admission charges, expens- 
es, and allocation of reserved seat tickets. 
Disagreement on any of these items shall 
be referred to the Commissioner, and his 
decision shall be final. 

Sec. C. The proceeds of the final games in 
each class shall accrue to the K.H.S.A.A. 
after the necessary expenses have been paid. 
Actual expenses, not to exceed those given 
above, shall be paid. A team not requiring 
transportation, meals or lodging shall receive 
a minimum of $100.00 for miscellaneous ex- 
penses. 



THE DICKINSON FOOTBALL 
RATING SYSTEM 

(As modified and adopted by the Board of Control) 
Section I 

1. First division includes all teams that 
have won more games than they have lost 
during the season. Others are second divis- 
ion teams. 

2. For each victory of a first division 
team over a first division team the winner 
gets 30 points and the loser 15 points. 

3. For a tie between first division teams 
each team gets 22 'X; points. 

4. For each victory of a first division 
team over a second division team the first 
division team gets 20 points and the second 
division team gets 10 points. 

5. For each victory of a second division 
team over a first division team the winner 
gets 30 points and the loser gets 10 points. 

6. For each victory of a second division 
team over a second division team the win- 
ner gets 20 points and the loser gets 10 
points. 

7. For each tie between second division 
teams each team gets 15 points. 

8. For each tie between a first division 
team and a second division team the first 
division team gets 15 points and the second 
division team gets 20 points. 

Section II 

1. No team shall be penalized for a victory 
in an extra game. To avoid this, the extra 
game shall be omitted from calculation. 

2. If two second division teams have won 
the same number of victories over first or 
second division teams, but have lost a dif- 
ferent number of grimes to first division 
teams, the extra defeats shall be omitted 
from the calculations. 

Section III 
1. An undefeated team shall always be 



ranked above every team it has defeated, 
even though the average number of "points" 
in the season's ratings may indicate other- 
wise. 

2. A team with a percentage of .500 is in 
the second division. It will be considered to 
be in the first division if one third of its 
games have been with first division teams 
and have resulted in at least one tie and one 
victory. 

3. If, in a game having a bearing on the 
championship, a first division team should 
profit by tying another team in the first 
division, when defeating it would lower the 
defeated team into the second division, the 
place of the teams in their divisions shall 
be determined without considering the game. 

4. A team undefeated in its district, 
which has played at least three games with 
teams in its district, shall rank above all 
teams in its district which it has defeated. 

Section IV 

1. If the foregoing directions have been 
accurately followed, the final standing may 
be determined by getting the average num- 
ber of points. 

2. If two teams have the same average 
points for the entire season, the victor in the 
game played- between them during the regu- 
lar season shall be ranked a^^ove the loser. 

3. If three teams have the same number 
of "points" for the entire season, and two of 
them have played each other, the lo^er in 
this game shall be ranked third and the 
other two tied for the highest rank. 

(Do not attempt to apply this system 
until all of the games of the season have 
been played.) 

BULLETIN! 

The following bulletin from the Com- 
missioner to administrators of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools was mailed on August 5, 
1963 : 

Due to the fact that out-of -season basket- 
ball and football scrimmages and games ap- 
pear to be on the increase, the Board of Con- 
trol of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association in a recent meeting asked the 
Commissioner to give his interpretation of 
Association regubtions with respect to poss- 
ible violations of these regulations bv mem- 
ber school principals allowing their athletes 
to take part in these contests. 

The Commissioner stated that the foot- 
ball season is defined as beginning on t'^e 
opening d-^te of school and ending with the 
plaving of the last regularly scheduled game, 
and the basketball season is defined as be- 
ginning on the opening date of school and 
endino- on the final day of the St'^te Tourna- 
ment. He further stated that all out-of-sea- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEIPTBMBER, 1963 



Page Eleven 



son games should be considered post-season 
games, that out-of-season scrimmages be- 
tween teams representing K.H.S.A.A. mem- 
ber schools should be considered games, and 
that only the Board of Control has the au- 
thority to sanction out-of-season games and 
scrimmages. 

The Commissioner said that this inter- 
pretation would probably result in a tighten- 
ing of the Board of Control sanction policy, 
and he asked for an opinion from each Board 
member concerning whether or not this in- 
terpretation should be established. It was the 
unanimous opinion of the Board members 
that this rules interpretation by the Com- 
missioner was entirely correct, that the 
policy involved should be established as a 
Board policy, and that the administrators of 
K.H.S.A.A. member schools should be noti- 
fied immediately concerning this policy in 
order that the information might be passed 
on to their football and basketball coaches. 

Players competing in non-sanctioned out- 
of-season games and scrimmages lose their 
high school eligibility. In-season football 
scrimmages between teams representing K. 
H.S.A.A. member schools are to be consider- 
ed games, and in-season basketball scrim- 
mages between teams representing member 
schools must be counted aginst the game lim- 
it mentioned in K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 21. 



K. H. S. C. A. 

On April 18, 1963, the first amniml basketball 
clinic of the Kentucky High School Coaches Associa- 
tion was held at the Hideaway Room in the Student 
Union Building on the University of Louisville cam- 
pus. The clinic began at 9:30 A.M., with the follow- 
ing coaches presenting the program: Robert Mulcahy 
(Seneca H.S.), coach of the 1963 state champions; 
John Lykins (Frankfort H.S.), coach of a 19"3 C.K.C. 
co-championship team; Jock Sutherland (Harrison 
H.S.), coach of the champions of the Mid-States Con- 
ference; and Jim Bazzell (Allen County H.S.), coach 
of a 1963 regional winner. 

Approximately forty-five coaches were present for 

the program which had been arranged by Coach Bob 

Wright otf Ashland and his committee. Given below 

is a resume of on" of the talks which were presented. 

MAD DOG DEFENSE 

by Jock Sutherland 

This is the name we call the defense used at 
Harrison County High School. It is a half-court 
pressure-press type of defemse, and is for the school 
with average size, average speed, average ability, but 
a great deal of desire. The name makes our defense 
something special to our people and they respect it. 

The principle is to meet the opposition at the 
center line and to make every effort to prevent them 
from entering into the offensive area. After this 
penetration is made the defense must adjust to the 
situation which may be to a normal man-to-man de- 
femse or some variety of the zone. 

The young basketball players today are such out- 
standing slhooters that you can not allow them to 
enter the area they want to enter. m?"''e f^" -oass 
they want to make, or get ibe screen. Therefore, it 



is necessary that the defense you employ be a type 
of multiple defense such as the "Mad Dog" defense. 
In this deifenise we get: (1) double team situations, 
(2) pressure on the ball at all times, (3) over-play 
on strong side receiver, (4) zone at particular points, 
(5) a great deal of ball or pass anticipation. 

These points mentioned tend to force the opposi- 
tion imto mistakes, take the bad shot, lose confidence, 
an/d above aU they will tend to make the opponents 
careless and play a runaway type of game complete- 
ly different from their normal pattern of play. 

The defense must also be versatile. When the 
pressure at the linie fails, there has to be an adjust- 
ment made. Naturally the closer the ball gets to the 
scoring area, the more cautious the defense must be. 
This adjustment from the gamibling line play to a 
basic well disciplined type of de(feTi'se is the hardest 
part of a half-court press, but caai be accomjplished 
with a great deal of organized drill. 

Since th'e basic principle of the defense is to ob- 
tain the baill in a hectic flurry of arms and bodies, 
it is essen/tial that some type of offensive attack 
from the steal be planned. This we accomplished by 
ohantinig the errors and determining the area where 
the big percentage of these errors occur. At these 
points we estalbUsh definite lane filling assignments 
with the hall always having the right-of-way. If this 
fast break situation does not materialize, it is im- 
portant that the ball be held up and a regular offen- 
sive pattern be put into action. This is another part 
of the defense that is hard to teach. The wild "Mad 
Dog" type of defense tends to force our own people 
into the same type of offensive play but it can be 
controlled with constant drilling. 

The defense itself will stimulate your people to be 
aggressive and take a little pride in their defense. 
To our opponents and to other people, the "Mad Dog" 
defense means a mass of confusion. To the boys here 
at Harrison County High School, the "Mad Dog" 
defense means organized confusion. 



FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library 
of the University of Kentucky College of Education. 
The Code letters "e,i,s,c.a," refer to elementary, 
junior high, senior high, college and adult audiences 
who may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental 
prices shown do not apply to schools which use one of 
the special subscription strvico plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Football 
BALL HANDLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-cna, 1 reel, 
$1.50. 

Fundamentals of ball handling are stressed; 
stance, grip, "feel" of the ball, finger-tip control, 
adjustment before throwing or kicking, receiving 
passes from center or from a back, catching passes 
and pimits, ways of carrying ball, and changing from 
one hand to another. Game shots are presented, using 
slow motion and stop action teohnioues, and superim- 
posed animation to illustrate principles. 
BLOCKING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $1.50. 

P\indamentals of good blocking are taught in this 
film: position, speed, drive, follow-through, timing, 
and body control. Describes shoulder and body blocks, 
demonstrating several varieties of these. Importance 
of good physical condition, practice, and experience 
are emphasized. Special photography used to illustrate 
different points. 

FOOTBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$.75. 

In the film an extrovert "Old Grad" chooses 
Football Rules as quiz show category. His experience 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1963 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Lexington, Ky. 

School Representative 

JAMES HAUSBERGER 

Cynthiana, Ky. 

Phone 234-1118 

In Stock for Immediate Delivery 

Spanjian No. 806 Pants— Football $ 5.95 ea. 

Red Fox White Football Practice Jersies $ 1.95 ea. 

Riddell & Hyde Football Shoes $10.95 UP 

Riddell White Helmets — We stripe $18.95 ea. 

All Star Socks $ 4.50 Dz. 

Bike & Cramer Products 

DCP & CP-36 Shoulder Pads 

J5V & TO Footballs 

Riddell Kicking Toe & Coach's Shoes 

Spanjian No. 229RG White Football Jersey $ 7.55 ea. 

Shur-Fit Mouthpieces $ 1.35 ea. 

Scrimmage Vests $12.75 Dz. 

We letter in our store for quick delivery. 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



277-3977 



Dick Wallace 



with official interpretations proves interesting, 
humorous and embarrasing. At the end, he realizes 
his knowledge is very meager on such things as — 
officials and their duties — what constitutes pass 
interference — rights on muffed punt — etc., and 
his wife had to take over for him. 
FOOTBALL GAMES OF UK, j-s-c-a, 3 reels each, 
$.75. 

Several old football films showing University of 
Kentucky in such games as Cotton Bowl, Sugar Bowl, 
etc., have been placed in the library for those who 
wish to use them. 
GAME OF GAMES, j^s-c-a, IVa reels, $2.50 

The highlights of the 1946 Army-Navy football 
game are presented in slow motion. It is filmed by 
"official" photographer of the Athletic Association 
of the U. S. Naval Academy. 
OFFICIAL FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75. 

This film portrays the pLay situations covering 
the basic rules of football as played under the 
National Alliance Code. The bheme is centered around 
the official interpretations of the rules as they apply 
to the three teams always present on the fi"l.H, the 
home team, the visiting team and that aU important 
third beam, the officials. 
TACKLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50. 

Tackling properly is shown as the result of 
application of certain fundamentals: good physical 
condition, speed, body placement, drive, sure grip, 
timing, and body control. Shoulder and cross body 
tackles are demonstrated in various ways, with 
special instructions for safety and means of a re- 
ducing shock. 
THIS IS FOOTBALL, e- j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75. 

Centered around the four S's — science, speed, 
- skill, and safety. Demonstrations cover basic rules 



that will aid the official, coach, player, and fan. 
Play situations are iised to establish standards. 



A Creed For Athletic Officials 

Believing that mine is an impoi'tant part in the 
nation-wide school athletic program, I pledge my- 
self to act in accordance with these principles. 

1. To know fully the i-ules and accepted officiating 
procedm-es for each sport in which I serve as arbiter. 

2. To build my game schedule through my accept- 
ed worth, potential possibilities and inherent character 
rather than through transitory acquaintance or trad- 
ing of favors or tempted pressures. 

3. To honor every contract, even though this may 
occasionally result in financial loss or loss of oppor- 
tunity to work for a larger school or one involving 
less travel. 

4. To keep myself physically and mentally fit. 

5. To be systematic, prompt, and business-like in 
all my dealings with those I serve. 

6. To wear the accepted Official's attire and to 
maintain a neat and creditable appearance. 

7. To act in such a way as to be a worthy example 
to those under my supervision. 

8. To remember that my responsibility also ex- 
tends to my fellow officials and that I must work as 
one member of the team. 

9. To make my decisions promptly but without 
snap judgment, firmly but without arrogance, fairly 
but without officiousness; and to base them on the 
rules regardless of the type of school, the closeness 
of the score or the opinions of partisan spectators. 

10. To keep in mind that my first charge is the 
safety and general welfare of those under my 
supervision. — National Federation Press 



Our Thanks 

TO THE COUNTY AND 

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL SYSTEMS 

AND THE COLLEGES 

AND INDIVIDUAL SCHOOLS 

WHICH HAVE CHOSEN US TO HANDLE 

THEIR STUDENT AND ATHLETIC 

ACCIDENT PROGRAMS FOR 1963-64 



^Ue Kin<fde4t Go4nfia4Uf, 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 

P. 0. BOX 7116 LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 252-8522 



PUMA for PERFORMANCE and more TOUCHDOWNS! 



THE ALL SPORTS SHOE 



HUNTS, 




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Herzogenaurach 
West Germany 



Here's the story on PUMA shoes for football 
and other sports. Sweeping the country in 
a big way! You should buy some of these 
OXFORDS and try them NOW! 

It's down right sensational to get all these 
advantages in a football shoe for less than 
$12.95 to $15.95 but the price is only 



$8.75 pr. 



1. Tested and proved by major league and professional 
football players. 

2. Outstanding for backs and ends on a dry field. 
(Not so good in the mud.) 

3. An exceptional shoe for Jayvee and Jr. High teaeis. 

4. Little League and elementary school boys really 
love them. 

PUMA LASTIG 

EXTRA LIGHT, about half the weight of a 
regular shoe. It's SHOCK-PROOF .... 
sole and cleats are PUMA-LASTIC whidh 
will outwear the shoe. 

TWICE the usual number of cleats! 14 on 
each shoe, giving more traction, more lateral 
stability. 



All cleats but 2 on each shoe are near the outer edge of the sole which means bet- 
ter body balance This and the universal last makes a better fitting shoe which 
feels better on the foot, avoids blisters, affords great comfort. 

CLEAT AND SOLE TROUBLE ELIMINATED! The cleats are molded to 
the sole. No cleats to get loose, give trouble. No post trouble. No steel plate to 
crack . . . and this means greater flexibility. Not a shoe for muddy field, but for 
normal conditions, it's great. While some schools have bought 50 pairs, we sug- 
gest you only buy a few and try them on backs, fast ends and see what happens. 

ORDER YOURS NOW Sizes 1 to 14, 



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CH. 7-1941 



MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



CH. 7-1942 





HiqhkhoolAthMe 

Jine iSpo^tsmans C^eea 



The Player . . . 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach ... 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type man he wants his boys to be. 



The Oiiicial.,. 



1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator... 



1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

October, 1963 



TWELVE TYPES 

"If high school athletics are ever 'killed' 
it will be caused by the improper conduct 
of adults and not high school students" is 
a statement that this writer has made many 
times. Athletics conducted in the proper 
fashion are so valuable and educational that 
it is unthinkable that they should not be 
included in our high school curricular pro- 
gram, yet we have a few adults whose 
actions give support to those few people 
who would like to see the inter-school pro- 
gram destroyed. 

Those people whose acts are doing a 
disservice to our inter-high school athletic 
program fall under the following twelve 
general categories: 

1. Those adults who insist on gambling 
on high school athletic events. This group 
is composed largely of local people who bet 
on each game, and want a win, plus a 
specific number of points scored to insure 
the collection of their bet. 

2. Those few people who insist on drink- 
ing at high school athletic events. Football 
games are a part of the school curriculum, 
and the athletic field is merely an extension 
of the classroom, therefore such improper 
conduct cannot be condoned. 

3. Those few people who use loud and 
profane language. These people should not 
be allowed to disturb others. In no way can 
such conduct be justified in an educational 
program. 

Winning Only Goal 

4. Those few adults who insist on a win- 
ning team regardless of how it is done. 
These people adopt the pragmatic view that 
"anything which succeeds is good," and re- 
ject the ill effects which result to any edu- 
cational program which has as its goal "win 
at all cost." 

5. Those few adults who insist on giv- 
ing items of material value to high school 
athletes. The secondary school athletic pro- 
gram muist be amateur if it is to be justi- 
fied, and any philosophy based on economic 
gain from participation will, and rightly so, 
eventually kill the program. 

6. Those few adults who try to com- 
mercialize high school athletics. This group 
consists of individuals or firms who try 



to utilize the reputation of the high school 
athletes for advertising their own products 

or services. 

Well Balanced Program 

7. Those few adults who insist on a one- 
sport inter-school program. A well-balanced 
athletic program is essential to meet the 
needs of all students and any person who 
insists on a one-sport program and neglects 
all other activities is guilty of depriving 
other students of their just rights. 

8. Those few adults who insist on pro- 
moting all-star games. There is not a single 
professional educational organization that 
endorses all-star athletic events. 

9. Those few adults who object to state 
association rules because they affect local 
high school situations. Such adults do not 
realize that without rules to go by we 
would revert to the old "outlaw" days 
which were untenable and would destroy 
the secondary athletic program. 

Penny Wise Fans 

10. Those few adults who contend that 
gate receipts should finance the entire 
athletic program. Athletics are a part of 
the school curriculum and should be par- 
tially or wholly supported by tax funds. 
Any other view places undue emphasis on 
"winning." 

11. Those few adults who are poor 
sports. This group blames the coach, of- 
ficials or players for all losses. This group 
is guilty of improper conduct which creates 
dissension between schools and commun- 
ities. 

12. Those few adults who insist that 
the athletic teams be given all support to 
the detriment of the physical education 
and intramural program. There should be 
a place in the school curriculum for a broad 
base of physical education and intramurals 
for all, with an inter-school program for 
those with superior ability. Any other type 
of organization is dishonest as it grants 
rights to a few at the expense of the 
majority. 

Those few adults who fit into one or 
more of the twelve categories listed above 
are contributing indirectly to making pro- 
blems of conducting athletics. 

Fortunately, most adults do not fall in- 
to these groupings. Their support will in- 
sure the continuance of an educational 
athletic program. We need to work con- 
stantly on changing the attitudes of those 
adults who are harrassing secondary ath- 
letic programs. Constant vigilance is es- 
sential to maintain inter-school athletics on 
an educational basis. 

— Dr. Rhea H. Williams, 
Interscholastic Leaguer 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1963 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside 
or modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

1. Play: Specialized punter, Kl, enters as a 
substitute. The kick is made and the ball is recovered 
by Team R. Kl assumes that team possession will 
change ar.id immediately leaves the field. He is , re- 
placed by K2. It then develops that a foul occurred 
during the kick, and the penalty is accepted so that 
the Enticipated change of team possession does not 
develop. Is it permissible for punter Kl to re-enter 
and to participate in the down to be replayed? 

Ruling: If the situation is such that Kl did not 
have a i-easonable opportunity to know that a foul 
had occurred, the officials are authorized to permit 
Kl to participate in the dowin to be replayed on the 
assumption that the substitution was r.ot completed. 
Some elasticit.v on the part of the official is necessary 
in this situation, since the intent of the prohibition 
against withdrawal an-d re-entry during the same 
dead ball is to avoid the practice of using a substi- 
tute to bring in signals or information and then with- 
draw without participating. In order to avoid con- 
fusion, it is recommended that coaches instruct their 
substitutes to determine whether any foul has occurred 
before they commit themselves by entering the field. 

2. Play: On a try-for-point, the holder of the 
ball who has one knee on the ground catches it and 
then fumbles. Kl recovers the ball and drop kicks 
it through the goal. 

Ruling: The ball became dead when it was fumbl- 
ed by the intended holder for the place-kick. Kl kicked 
a dead ball through the goal. 

3. Play: Bl touches a forward pass and A2 
catches it while he is behind the line. A2 then throws 
a second foi-ward pass to interal limeman A8 who 
is beyond the line. 

Ruling: Forward pass interference by A8. If 
there is more than one legal foi-ward pass, ineligible 
A is restricted during the second pass to the same 
extent that he was during the first pass. 

4. Play: After advancing five yards, Al fumbles 
the ball on B's 2 yardline and it rolls into B's end 
zone. B2 bats the ball over the end line. 

Ruling: If A accepts the pe.-jalty, they will next 
put the ball in play on B's 1 yardline, the penalty 
being one half the distance to the goal measured from 
the spot where the run of Al ended (2 yardline). If 
the penalty is declined, it is a touchback. 

5. Play: After a fair catch, Team A puts the ball 
in play at the inbounds line by a snap. Team B com- 
mits a personal foul during the down, (a) Before the 
referee has placed the ball ready-for-play, captain 
Al requests it be placed midway between the inbounds 
lines for a free-kick, or (b) after the referee has 
placed the ball at the inbounds mark on the proper 
yardline Team A huddles and subsequently takes 
time-out. During or after the time-out they request 
the referee to place the ball midway between the in- 
bounds lines. 



Ruling: In (a) the request is granted. In (b) the 
request is denied. A request for a special placement of 
the ball when the privilege is available to the snapping 
or free-kicking team must be made prior to any 
charged time-out granted during that dead ball period. 

6. Play: May a 2-inch kicking tee be used for 
point after touchdown kicks? 

Ruling: Yes. A 2-inch kicking tee is legal for 
use for any place-kick, including free kicks,, scrim- 
mage-kicks and point-after-touchdown kicks. The 2- 
incli tee is not mandatory and place-kicks may be made 
with the ball being placed directly on the ground, 
or with the traditional 1-inch tee being used. The 
rule specifically requires that any tee which is used 
must be made of pliable material. 

7. Play: Euring a legal forward pass which ends 
behind the line, Bl, while on A's side of the line of 
scrimmage, uses his hands on A2. Is this forward pass 
i.-jterference? 

Ruling: No. If Bl is attempting to get at the ball 
and he does so without committing a personal foul, 
the use of his hands is legal. If Bl holds, or is not 
attempting to get to the ball, the use of his hands 
in his situation is illegal. The distance penalty for 
illegal use of hands is the same as that for pass inter- 
fedence, i.e., 15 yards, but there is no loss of dovrai. 

8. Play: Bl intercepts a forward pass or catches 
a punt on his 30 yeardline and he (a) uses a punt to 
return-kick, or (b) advances 20 yards and uses a pun; 
to return-kick, or (c) advances 50 yards and drop 
kicks the ball through the goal posts. 

Ruli.'g: Legal in (a), (b) and (c). In (c) a field 
goal has been scored. 

9. Play: Rl bats a free-kick (a) out-of bounds, 
or (b) R2 recovers and advances. 

Ruling: The b:t of Rl is illegal and the clock 
will not start in (a). In (b) the clock will be started 
when R2 touches the kick and it will continue to run 
until the down end?. Then it will be stopped in order 
to give the offended captain an opportunity to accept 
or decline the penalty. 

10. Play: Al is offside during a legal forward 
pass which is intercepted by Bl. While Bl is advanc- 
ing, B2 clips. 

Ruling: Double foul. The down is replayed. 

11. Phy: During the entire game, until well into 
the 4th quai-ter. Team A has been using the T forma- 
tion.With a limited time to play (approximately 4 
minutes) Team A has the ball on B's 10 yardline. 
Team A players take T formation positions after 
which the backfield shifts to another formation, and 
then the ball is snapped. Has Team A committed an 
infractio.n? 

Ruling: IMerely using a shift is not an illegal act. 
The only way this could be an infraction is if the 
movement were in the nature of a false start which 
is used for the purpose of drawimg the opponent into 
encroachment or offside. The defensive team is ex- 
pected to be on the alert for an additional shift a; 
any time during the game and should charge into 
(Continued on Page Five) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



OCTOBER, 1963 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 3 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hie:h School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexin^on. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville; 
Preston Holland (1961-65); Murray; Don R. Rawjings (1961-65). 
Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



^'lom the Ci 



ommissionei s 



Employment Bureaus 



Offi 



ice 



Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have 
been established. Each registered official should 
file at once with his bureau head and/or the 
nearest bureau head his schedule of games and list 
of dates on which the official will be available to 
call games. The names of the bureau heads, with 
the residence and business phone numbers (residence 
numbers given first), are as follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, 1320 Wells Blvd., Mur- 
ray, PL 3-3579, 762-3585 Ext. 286 

Region 2. Charlie Irwin, Route No. 1, Hopkins- 
ville, TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 

Region 3. Roy Settle, 1618 Sioux PI., Owensboro, 
MU 3-2136, MU 3-3571 

Region 4. Jerry Kimmel, Bee(2hmont, GR 6-2656, 
GR 6-2656 

Region 5. Turner Elrod, Bowling Green, Western 
Ky. State College. VI 2-5110, VI 2-0341, Ext. 211, 212 

Region 6. Howard Gardner, McCullum Ave., 
Elizabethtown, 765-6273, Fort Knox, 4-t638 

Region 7. Claude Ricketts, 10005 3rd St. Road, 
Valley Station, WE 7-8610 ME 4-1551 Ext. 220 

Region 8. Elino Head, 113 Alton Rd., Shelbyville, 
ME 3-4220, ME 3-1750 

Region 9. Ducan Huey, Boone County High 
School, Florence, AT 3-3361 (Bus.) 
Region 10. Jack Wise, Georgetown, 2052, 120 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, 1612 Hawthorne 
Ln., Lexington, 299-1757, 255-2960 Ext. 284 

Region 12. Briscoe Inman, Danville, 236-5740, 
236-5211 

Region 13. Bill Nau, Barboui-ville, 6-4112, 6-3057 

Region 14. Goebel Ritter, Whitesburg, 633-7164, 
633-2339 

Region 15. E. B. May, Jr., Box 185, Prestons- 
burg, TU 6-3414, TU 6-8661 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, 2147 Central Ave., 
Ashland, 324-2665, 324-6191 



Football District Changes 

To be added to the list of football schools printed 
in the August issue of the ATHLETE are the fol- 
lowing: Burgin, Camp Dick Robinson, Mt. Vernon, 
Paint Lick — Class A, Region II, District 2; Thomas 
Jefferson — Class AAA, Region II, District 2. Re- 
moved from the list should be the names of Scott 
County (Class AA, Region II, District 2), Owings- 
ville (Class A, Region III, District 1), and West 
Main (Class A, Region IV, District 2). 



Certified Football Officials 

(A list of 1963 Approved officials and newly Certified officials 
will appear in the November issue of the ATHLETE.) 



Bennett, Howard 
Blanton, Homer 
Boyles, Jerry F. 
Brown, George W. 
Calm-n, E. C. 
Canter, John 
Davis, Clyde E. 
Durkin, Jack H. 
Elovitz. Carl 
Flor3nce, Rob2rt H. 
Forbes, J. W. "Jack" 
Fort.:ey, Robert L. 
Gammon, W. H. 
Graham, James 
Hadden, Newell 
Hagerman, Bart 
Heinze, Frank 
Heinze, John G. 
Holeman, Fletcher 



Johnson, Bernard 
McCollum, Bob 
McN?bb, Edgar 
Mav. E. B., Jr. 
Mayhew, Wm. M. 
Mayo, Herry L. 
Mordica, William A. 
Mullins, B. E. 
Noland, Doug 
Riggs, William T. 
Schmitt, K. F. 
Shaw, John H. 
Showalter, John 
Smith, Edgar, J. 
Stephenson, Harry 
Stone, Clifton 
Sullivan, Don C. 
VanMeter, Eavid G. 
Wilson, John Pope 



KAPOS News 

ATTENTION! 

Principals, Sponsors, Cheerleaders! 

The Kentucky Association of Pep Or- 
ganization Sponsors and the University of 
Kentucky Extended Programs will sponsor 
a one day clinic for sponsors and cheerlead- 
ers on the University campus November 9, 
1963. 

K. A. P. 0. S. is proud to announce that 
the Mr. Lawrence Herkimer will conduct 
this clinic. Mr. Herkimer is Executive Di- 
rector of the National Cheerleaders Assoc- 
iation and is known throughout the country 
as "Mr. Cheerleader." He was featured in 
the March issue of Sports Illustrated, and 
this spring he toured the South American 
countries conducting clinics. 

SPONSORS make your plans now to 
bring your entire squad to this fall clinic. 
A highlight of the day will be the luncheon 
for sponsors where you can share your 
ideas and problems with other sponsors. 
New KAPOS officers will be elected at this 
time. Details concerning the clinic will be 
sent to you in care of your PRINCIPAL . . . 
.you should get the information in early 
October if your PRINCIPAL puts the letter 
in your mail box. 

MEMBERSHIP ... IS YOUR SCHOOL 
A 1963-64 MEMBER OF K.A.P.O.S.? If 
not, send your $2.00 to Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, 
University of Kentucky and make the 
check payable to K. A. P. O. S. Membership 
cards will be mailed upon receipt of the 
!?2.00. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Page Three 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is ^ven for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the 
home phone. 

Adams, Charlcj David, 5702 Indian Rock Rd., Louisville 19. 

GL 8-7448, 584-7266 
Adkins, James A., Jr., 7S22-A Snartz St., Fort Knox, 4-3201, 

4-7628 
Bahnsen, Capt. John C, Jr., 5742-A Allison Ave., Ft. Knox, 

4-7807, 4-7351 
Baker, Charles J., 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 443-3043. Frank- 
fort, Ky., CA 7-2231, Ext. 480 
Barnett, Willie E., Jr.. 2208 W. Chestnut St., Louisville, SP 

8-7626, SP 8-2721 
Benton, James L., 505 Locust St., Vine Grove, Fort Knox, Ky. 

4-1849 
Benzinger, Joseph, Greenmound Rd., New Richmond, Ohio, 

742-8691, 752-"555 
Berger. John D.. Jr., 436 B 9th Ave., Fort Knox, 4-2580, 4-3424 
Brown, Herman G., Route No. 2. Shelbyville, 633-1692, 633-2653 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly Ave., Lexington, 252-0954. 

252-3212 
Burkhart, James G., Loyall 

Burton, John. 533-28th St., Ashland. 324-5964, 3-1111, Ext. 349 
Bunch, William, RA15561727, Spec. Serv. Div., APO 679, U.S. 

Forces, New York, N.Y. 
Byrd. Harry G., 7331 North Timberlane Dr.. Cincinnati 43, Ohio. 

561-8745, 561-8745 
Caiman, E. C, Jr., 1124 Washington, Box 218, Sturgis, 333- 

4655, 333-5545 
Canaday, Jacy Glenn, Box 501, Vine Grove, 877-2121, 828- 3898 
Cassell David F., 3774 Fincastle Rd.. Louisville 13. GL 4-5444 
Cathey. Gene, 1415 Vine, Murray, 753-5367, 763-3245 
Clark, Maxie B., 165 Avon Ave., Lexington, 264-9301, 252-0410 
Clinard, Fred L., 227 Craigmeade Circle, Nashville, Tenn., 

883-0240, AL 6-7235 
Clusky. Joe, Red Jacket, W. Va. 

Coley. Gene. 2911 W. Brook St., Evansville. Indiana 
Compton. Ben. Ill Perry St., Box 1, Louisa, 8-4171 
Coulter, William M., 807 Taylor Ave., Evansville 13, Indiana, 

HA 3-7510, HA 51101 
Craig, Randy, 5069 Orange Lawn Dr.. Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 261- 

5074 
Davis, Ralph C. 604 North 4th St.. Ironton, Ohio. JE 2-8606 
Di Muzio, Robert M., 5841 Brouse Ave., Indianapolis, Indiana, 

CL 3-7686, CL 3-7686 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckinridge Lane, Louijville, GL 

8-1079, JU 2-3611 Ext. 472 
Fox. John M., 2140 Alta Ave., Louisville, GL 1-7570. 769-9100 
Gillespie, Robert C, No. 8 Wilana Court, Pikeville. 7-7934, 

7-7190 
Gluszek, Henry, Box 695, Lynch, VI 8-2598 
Grace H. E., Jr., Middlesboro. 4, Pineville. Ky. ED 7-3320 
Griggs, Gerald E., 305 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 843-3968, 842- 

0391 
Griggs, John M., 616 Freeman, Lexington, 299-6429 
Haifey, Stan, 1243 Garden Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, PO 1-2884, 

PH 1-8931 
Harris, Mickey, Bid. 5339 Brett Drive. Apt. E, Ft. Knox, 

4-4691, 4-6712 
Harri-j, Russell, 368 Boiling Springs, Lexington 254-6525 
Howerton, Jack, Jr., 112 South 5th St., Louisville, 245-8456, 

587-6516 
Hughes, Robert E., 400 Briggs, Russellville, P.\ 6-6334, PA 

6-6335 
Irwin, Charlie. Route No. 1, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 
Isaacs, John F., 253 Delmar Ave., Lexington, 252-8102 
Knight, James A., 114 Walnut, Paintsville, 789-3602 
Lally. James J., 1210 Ross Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, GA 1-6700, 

471-3644 
Leahy, Pat, 1819 Ratcliffe, Louisville, SP 6-6368, JU 7-1121 

Ext. 472 
Mitchell, Vyron W., 901 Walnut. Fulton, 1648, 30 
Mooneyhan, Jamou H.. 810 Henry St.. Franklin. 686-4989 
Moss, Howard A., Box 1042. Paducah. 898-3168, 442-4474 
Mudd, Ed, 3512 Mildred Drive, Louisville, SP 6-6888 
Noel, Donald L., 3330 Lester, Louisville, EM 8-7919 
Padgett, R. K., 2021/, College. Somerset 
Pinson, Eugene, 3208 Haekworth St., Ashland, 324-6648, 324- 

3101 
Powell, Logan G., 771 Shelby, Lexington, 254-1213, 252-7676 
Raque. Ronald. 3861 E. Fincastle, Louisville, GL 4-6781, 637-9171 
Ray, Robert D., 407 Ijeyton Ave., Louisville 22, 895-3664. 896- 

3654 
Ray. William H., 212 Dantzler. Lexington, 256-2413. 277-6991 
Renfro, John Edwin, 445 Florence, Williamuburg, 6488, 6808 
Rentz, Thomas W., 161 Chenault, Lexington, 266-8242 
Rudolph Fred, Jr., 5600 Jeanine Dr., Louisville, 969-3013, ME 

5-7441 
Selvy, Curt, Route No. 2, Box 26A, Corbin, 2422, 1333 
Shirley, Michael D., Jr., 1306 Fairdale Road, Fairdale, EM 

6-3078 
Shumate, Roy V., 201 Island, Harlan, 189 
Smithson, Richard A., 1945 Nashville Rd., Bowling Green, 

VI 3-4844 



Sowers, William R., Jr., 6738 A Dalton, Ft. Knox, 4-7872, 

4-7351 
Stephenson. Harry J., 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1767, 

256-2960 Ext. 284 
Stofft, William A., 5464 D Lowe, Ft. Knox. 4-4664 
Tirey, Lt. Col., James H., U.S.A. M.B.. Ft. Knox, 4-3562. 4-8569 
Waller. Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore, Lexington, 299-6123 
Welch, Bill, 1324 Beech, Cincinnati 5, Ohio, 471-8090. 721-9509 
Whittemore. S/Sgt. Paul F., Qtrs. 360. USMA, West Point, 

N.Y., 3360. 38"9 
Wray, Robert F., 29 Belle Monte. So. Ft. Mitchell, 331-2594, 

341-8293 
Zehner, Albert. 9801 Watterson Lane, Jeffersontown, AN 

7-1677 



MINUTES 
KHSAA SWIMMING COMMITTEE 

August 10, 1963 

The Swimming Committee, an advisory group to 
the Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Associ/tion, met in the Association's build- 
ing on Ross Street in Lexington at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, 
August 10, 1963. (The usual meeting time in the 
calendar year followed the Class B Championships in 
April. Due to certain conditions underlying the nature 
of the problems before the committee, this meeting 
was postponed to the above-mentioned time.) 

The following members of he committee were pre- 
sent: iWr. E. W. Craik. Louisville; IMr. Marshall Beard, 
Louisville; Mr. Jrck Thompson, Louisville; Mr. Frank 
Ogden, Lexington; Mr. Donald Davis, Bellevue; Mrs. 
Wilma Bell, Cynthiana; Commissio.'.er Ted Sanford, 
Lexington; and Chairman Algie Reece, Lexington. 

The chairman called meeting to order. Mr. Cecil 
A. Thornton, rewly elected president of the Board of 
Control, was a welcome visitor. He was introduced 
to the committee. Mr. Davis, newly appointed to the 
committee as Board of Conrol representative, was 
also introduced and most cordially welcomed. 

The chairman reviewed the problems which con- 
fro.'.ted the committee at the end of the 1962-63 sea- 
son. This was necessary since there was no possibility 
of their being acted upon in the Spring for lack of 
information. These problems were based on the fact 
that the pai'ticipation of High School Swimmi-g has 
increased to the point that the program was costly . . . 
more so than it should be, both in time and money, 
when compared to other sports sponsored by the 
Association. At the end of the season some committee- 
men felt that the oncoming season would be the time 
to enter regional meets for swimming. Also the 
question of conducting both Class A and Class B meets 
at the University of Kentucky pool was doubtful, due 
to the conflicts in the pool program at the University. 

A summary report of the meets co.'.ducted for 
the 62-63 season at the University was distributed to 
each member in mimeographed form. The meet 
manager, Mr. Reece, also reported on the following 
participation statistics: 

1. Cbss A meet, February 22-23, 19S3 at Coliseum 
Pool, University of Kentucky-10 teams ith 158 in- 
dividual contestants 

2. Class B meet, and Girls' meet, March 30, 1963, 
at the Coliseum Ir'ool, Universitv of Ke(ntucky-12 
Class B boys' teams with 145 individuals, 16 Girls' 
teams wth 125 individuals 

Commssioner Sanford reported that the expenses 
for swimming amounted to $5,176.39. He reported 
that, in view of this increase (due to practice of 
some schools sending more team members than nec- 
essary because their expense was borne by the As- 
sociation), the Board of Control, in its recent meet- 
ing had decided to reimburse State Swimming Meet 
expenses for participants and coaches on a fifty 
percent basis. 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 




Westport Jnigh ycnooi m jeiierson Coun- 
ty is engaging in football for the first time 
this year. What is equally important is that 
Westport's community spirit has won for 
Principal "Mike" Brucchieri's School the 
first Abou Ben Adhem Award of the K. 
H. S. A. A. Athletic Year. 

The citizens of that area decided only a 
year ago that their youngsters should have 
a lighted Football Field when they opened 
their varsity competition. The project would 
cost money — lots of money which had to be 
raised Incally. 'I hat was the tim? the com- 
munity called on Orville Schmied to show 
them how — and how Orville showed them! 

Schmied's ability to orgainze had "White 
Collar Citizens" with their sleeves rolled up 
working. Then Westport's students "Caught 
fire" and went to work to raise money, with 
the result that in its first year of football 
Westport boasts one of the best-lighted 
fields in Kentucky — and all because adults 
cared enough for their kids to work for and 
with them. THE DUTCHMAN salutes West- 
port's community spirit. "May Your Tribe 
Increase!" 

Right now THE DUTCHMAN is heading 
the nose of his worn-out "gas-burner" to- 
ward Elizabethtown and Bowling Green for 
the first two Basketball Clinics of the 1963- 
1964 season. Howard Gardner will have a 
big Sunday dinner I'eady at Elizabethtown. 
That Officials' A.ssociation at E'Town is 
"On the B'^ll." Kentucky should develop 
many more like the one in Hardin County. 

This year marks our twenty-second con- 
secutive annual trip over Kentucky, work- 
ing with coaches, officials, timers and scor- 
ers for the K. H. S. A. A. On our first 
sashay in 1942 we had a total attendance of 
ninety-six. It's a safe prediction that three- 



thousand will make their voices heard this 
year. 

Kenny Blankenbaker, a prominent South- 
ern Indiana Official, emphasized at a meet- 
ing this month the tremendous increase of 
the popularity of the clinics as is evidenced 
by the increase of from 96 to 3000. He ask- 
ed how we could account for this. It's easy. 
In 1942 attendance was optional; now you've 
"gotta" come or you can't officiate or 
coach. Nuff Sed! 

A lot of interesting events characterize 
each year's basketball study sessions. Ex- 
pect to find the same officials attending 
one, two and even three clinics. Beechmont's 
Jerry Kimmel attended four last year. 

Athletic Director Bill Clark of Somer- 
set started a fine custom several years ago. 
This consisted of setting up a steak dinner 
on the night of the clinic for your hungry 
interpreter. This custom has now swept the 
Commonwealth — happily. 

This year Citizens of one town alone, 
Hazard, have sent a half-dozen invitations 
to T-Bone Steak affairs. Ernie Chattin of 
Ashland, who claims to be the best steak 
Chef of them all, will charcoal a few for 
the DUTCH BOY in his back yard before 
we head for Ashland's session. 

Sure, I've got a "Pot." You can't do 
these clinics and not get one. The Clinic 
Director should fast a week before starting 
out. 

Kentucky has long claimed the tittle of 
"Sportsmanship Capitol" of the Nation. 
Now its citizens want the "Hospitality 
Championship" also. For my money, they've 
already got it. 

Ashland's Courtney Clark is high in his 
praise of Football Official Kermit Blosser. 
Courtney thinks that Kermit is a fine ex- 
ample for voung athletes to pattern from. 
THE DUTCHMAN agrees. This chap is an 
Ohio product who does many things besides 
officiate football. When Ashland citizens 
saw him officiate, they would have ap- 
preciated him more had they known some- 
thing about his record. 

Kermit is a winner. The golf teams he 
coaches at Ohio University are fabulous. 
He personally won the National Collegiate 
Wrestling Championship in 1932, and has 
coached football, basketball and track 
champions all over Ohio. Because of his 
work for boys and the example he has set 
for them, Kermit wins the Corn Cob Pipe 
of Honor for the month of September. 
When THE DUTCHMAN conducts the Ohio 
State-Wide Baskethall Clinic in Columbus on 
November 17, 1963, Kermit will be one of 
the first chaps he will look up. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Page Five 



Spent some time in Chicago chatting 
about the new rules with CHff Fagan this 
month. A session with Cliff is the equiva- 
lent of a month's study with anybody else. 
We hope to pass on his "Rules Tips" to you 
at our clinics. 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
the natural zone or across the line of scrimmage 
only at the snap. In the circumstances which are 
outlined in the play above. Team A is expected to 
execute the second shift so that it will comply with 
the rules and so thajt the shift will not be a false 
start. If the shift consists of a quick chargirig motion, 
similar to that usually used at the time the b-'ll is 
snapped, it is a false start. However, if the baekfield 
moves into its second, or new positions with delibera- 
tion, there is nothing in the rul°s to prevent their 
doing so. Obviously, some judgment on the part of 
the official is necessary in borderline cases. 

12. Play: If a fair catch is made during the last 
play of a quarter, is the quarter extended to permit 
a free-kick diaring the same quarter? 

Ruling: No. However, if there should be fair catch 
interference and If R should choose an awarded fair 
catch, it has the privilege of having the quarter ex- 
tended to pei-mit an additional untimed down, or. it 
may choose to start the new quarter (if the interfer- 
ence occured during the last down of the first or third 
quarter) with either a free kick or a snap. 

13. Play: Visiting coach protests the intended 
use of a field clock. 

Ruling: A field clock may be used as the official 
timepiece without the agreement of coaches. The 
rules provide that this (a timinsc device) "mav be a 
scroeboard electric clock" and Rule 3 — Time Factors 
in sections 4 and 5 respectively refer to starting and 
stopping the clock. Nowhere do the rules require an 
agreement when a field clock is used. Whenever an 
agreement is necessary to use a piece of equipment, 
the rules so specify. It is therefore obvious that .a 
field clock must be accepted as the official timepiece 
when it is in good working order. Whether the opera- 
tor of a scoreboard electric clock shall be a registered 
official is a decision of the state pssociation. Mosc 
progressive state associations consider an electric 
clock operator as a game official, and therefore, re- 
quire that he be a fully qualified and registered 
official. 

_ 14. Play: Competing teams agree to hold the 
coin toss in a dressing room, a minimum of 15 minutes 
before the game starting time. 

Ruling: Legal. Rule coverage does not determine 
where, or when the coin toss shall take place, except 
that it shall be before the starting time of the game. 
Regardless of where the toss is held, each team should 
have only one representative at the toss. Co-captains, 
other players and coaches, and other representatives 
of either team are not to participate in the toss and 
should not be in the vicinity while it is made. 

15. Play: (a) Several members of Team A ap- 
pear on the field ready to participate with tape or 
badages on their hands, or (b) Bl attempts to start 
or enter the game wearing a well padded hand, wrist 
or arm c?st, or a well padded guard made of sole 
leather, plastic, or other unyielding or hard substance. 

Ruling: In (a) it is illegal for a player to wear 
tape or bandage om a hand unless it is sanctioned by 
the umpire as being necessary to protect an injury. 



It is customary for the umpire to notify the coaches 
of participating teams, upon arrival at the game site, 
that he wishes to be in attendance when any hands 
are taped or bandaged and that he will permit such 
taping or bandaging only when it is necessary to do 
so for the protection of an injury. If several mem- 
bers of a team appear ready to play with hands taped, 
it is a suspicious situation and umpires are justified 
to have evidence presented that such bandaging or 
taping was necessary. In (b) the equipment is illegal 
and may not be worn. The umpire under no conditions 
is authorized to permit its use, even when there is 
evidence that the wearer has an injury. 

16: Play: Kl esks his team manager for his 
kicking shoe which he attempts to change during the 
between downs period, (a) He makes the change and 
tosses the replaced shoe off the field within the 25 
seconds ready-for-play period, or (b) he makes the 
change and leaves the replaced shoe on the field, or 
(c) he changes to a bsllet type shoe, or (d) he can- 
not complete the change within the 25 seconds ready- 
for-play period. 

Ruling: In (a) the action is legal. In (b) the 
official will remove the replaced shoe from the field 
because it is a safety hazard and will then penalize 
Team K for delay of gante. Ballet type shoes are not 
acceptable for football and in (c) if Kl or a substitute 
for him is not properly equipped at the time the ball 
is to be snapped, there is delay. In (d) Team K will 
require a charged time-out if it is available, or a 
penalty for delay must be assessed. Th" 25 second 
official's time-out for replacement of required equip- 
ment, or for coiTection of equipment which has be- 
come illegal through use is not to be granted for 
situations described in (b), (c) and (d). 

17. Play: After the clock has been stopped for a 
measurement and there has been no charged time-out 
during that dead ball period, when does the clock 
start? 

Ruling: When the referee gives the ready-for- 
play signal. This is an official's time-out and unless 
the clock stoppage is followed by a charged time-out, 
the clock starts when the ball is placed ready-for- 
play. 

18. Play: Have any errors or omissions been dis- 
covered in the 1963 Football Rules Book? 

Ruling: The last sentence in 1-3-4 (page 7) sho'idd 
have been expanded so as to read in the entirety as 
follows: "This may be a scoreboard electric clock or 
a stop watch carried by the umpire of a 3-man crew, 
or by the field judge of a 4 or 5-man crew." 3-4-2 
(page 19) should provide that "After a touchdown the 
clock shall not be started until the ball is legally 
touched after the kick-off followig the try-for-point." 
In 4-2-2J (page 23) the word should be "inadver- 
tently". In the Comments on the 1963 Sul^s Changes 
(page 50 and 51) the reference 3-5-1 shouM properly 
be 3-4-1 and the refsre.-.ca 4-1-7 should hi 4-3-4. 



ATTENTION, COACHES! 

Mrs. Kitty Baird, president of the Ken- 
tucky Association of Health, Physical Ed- 
ucation and Recreation, announced that the 
fall meeting of this group will be held at 
Cumberland Falls on October 25-27, 1963. 
Coaches are urged to attend the Men's 
Athletic Division of this Conference. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 









Jenkins 


Jenkins 


Ray Ricketts 


K.H.S.A.A. Football Schools 


Jessamine County 
K. M. I. 


Nicholasville 
Lyndon 


Elmer Stephenson 
Glynn Watts 


(Astericks 


Indicate 8-man 


Football School) 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


Charles D. Black 


SCHOOL 


ADDRESS 


COACH 


Lafayette 
Lancaster 


Lexington 
Lancaster 


John Snowden 
Waddell Murphy 


Anderson 


Lawrenceburg 


Henry Frazier 


LaRue County 


Hodgenville 


Clarence Caple 


Aquinas Prep. 


LoUBville 


W. H. Kleier 


Lebanon 


Lebanon 


Robert Hourigan 


Ashland 


Ashland 


Rex J. Miller 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


Robert Igo 


Atherton 


Louisville 


Jack Kleier 


Lily 


Lily 


Roy Cochran 


Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


Peter Rembert 


Lincoln 


Franklin 


William Griffith 


Austin Tracy-* 


Lucas 


Carroll Holmes 


Lincoln 


Paducah 


John C. McVoy 








Lincoln Inst. 


Lincoln Ridge 


Lyman Dale 


Barbourville 


Barbourville 


Tim Sowders 


Lloyd 


Erlanger 


Jack Turner 


Bardstown 


Bardstown 


Garnis Martin 


London 


London 


David Fryrear 


Bate 


Danville 


E. W. Broadus 


Louisa 


Louisa 


Wallace Isham 


Beechwood 


S. Ft. Mitchell 


George Rush 


Loyal I 


Loyall 


Charlie Daviu 


Belfi-y 


Belfry 


Albert Vipperman 


Lou>jville Co. Day 


Louisville 


Clin Fishback 


Bell County 


Pineville 


Ver-mont Owens 


Ludlow 


Ludiow 


Dan Sullivan 


Bellevue 


Bellevue 


Jim Jenkins 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


Jim Messer 


Bishop David Mem. 


Louisville 


Wally Enghtih 








Boone County 


Florence 


John Dorman 


McKell 


South Shore 


Tom Sims 


Bourbon County 


Paris 


Eugene Correll 


Madison Central 


Richmond 


Frank Asbury 


Bowling Green 


Bowling Green 


Jim Pickens 


Madison 


Richmond 


Bill Ransdell 


Bovd County 


Ashland 


Tom Scott 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


Bill Weiborn 


Boyle County 


Danville 


Jim Farley 


Male 


Louisville 


Charles Kuhn 


Bryan Station 


Lexington 


Virgil Chambers 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


Virgil Rains 


Burgin 


Burgin 


David Feeback 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


Ed Wilson 


Butler 


Louisville 


Milan Perpich 


Mercer County 


Harrodtiburg 


Amos Black 








Metcalf County 


Edmonton 


Howard B. Keel 


Caldwell Co. 


Princeton 


Fred R. Clayton 


Middlesborough 


Middlesborough 


Walt Green 


Campbell County 


Alexandria 


Bob Miller 


Millersburg Mill. In 


t.Millersburg 


Gordon Betts 


Campbellsville 


Campbellsville 


Vince Hancock 


Morgan County 


West Liberty 


Hal Lockhart 


Camp Dick Robinsc 


nLancaster 


James Summerlin 


Morganfield 


Morganfield 


Henry Hina 


Carrollton 


Carrollton 


Charles Gibson 


Mt. Sterling 


Mt. Sterling 


Phil Owen 


Catletluburg 
Caverna' 


Catlettsburg 
Horse Cave 


Eugene Foster 
B. H. Weaver 


Mt. Vernon 
Murray 


Mt. Vernon 
Murray 


Lawrence Travis 
Preston Holland 


Central 


Louisville 


James D. White 








Christian County 


Hopkin-jville 


Joe Cartwright 


Newport 


Newport 


Charlie True 


Clark County 


Winchester 


Jim Poynter 


Newport Catholic 


Newport 


Charles Frederick 


Corbin 


Corbin 


Ledger Howard 


Nicholas County 


Carlisle 


Gayle Bowen 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


Bill Huff 


North Hardin 


Vine Grove 


Daniel Walker 


Cumberland 


Cumberland 


Needham Saylor 














Oldham County 


LaGrange 


Ollie Howard 


Danville 


Danville 


Chester Caddas 


Old Kentucky HomeBardstown 


Milton Graham 


Daviess County 


Owensboro 


George Claiborne 


Owensboro 


Owensboro 


Ralph Genito 


Dayton 


Dayton 


Tom Daley 


Owensboro Catholic 


Owensboro 


Don Netc'jkio 


DeSales 


Louisville 


Gil Sturtzel 


Owen County 


Owenton 


Guy Patterson 


Dixie Heights 


So. Ft. Mitchell 


Bill Shannon 








Douglass 


Henderson 


George K. McGill 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


Ed Rutledge 


DuBois 


Mt. Sterling 


Arthur Hawkins 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


George May 


duPont Manual 


Louisville 


Tom Harper 


Paints ville 


Paints ville 


Walter J. Brugh 


Durrett 


Louisville 


Rex D. Slechter 


Paris 


Paris 


Ben Pumphrey 








Park City* 


Park City 


Aaron Turner 


East Main 


Lynch 


Edward Miracle 


P. L. Dunbar 


Lexington 


N. L. Passmore 


Eastern 


Middletown 


Charles Hord 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


Eugene Davis 


Elizabethtown 


Elizabethtown 


Bill Hogg 


Pineville 


Pineville' 


William Adams 


Elkhorn City 


Elkhorn City 


Jack Hall 


Pleasure Ridge Pk. 


Pleasure Ridge 


Pk. James 0. Gatewood 


Eminence 


Eminence 


Charles Quertermous 


Prestonsburg 


Prestonsburg 


Bert Dixon 


Evarts 


Evarts 


Charles Hunter 


Providence 


Providence 


Paul Armstrong 


Fairdale 


Fairdale 


Robert Simp'jon 


Raceland 


Raceland 


James Conley 


Fern Creek 


Fern Creek 


Earl Browning 


Rowan County 


Morehead 


Paul Ousley 


Flaget 


Louisville 


Paul Miller 


Ru'ssell 


Russell 


Heulyn Bishop 


Fleming Neon 


Fleming 


Raymond Isaacs 


Russellville 


Ru'ssellville 


Waymond Morris 


Fleming County 


Flemingsburg 


J. R. Shannon 








Fort Campbell 


Ft. Campbell 


Marshall Patterson 


St. Joseph 


Bardstown 


Richard Blocker 


Fort Knox 


Fort Knox 


John Hackett 


St. Xavier 


Louisville 


John Meihaus 


Frankfort 


Frankfort 


0. C. Leathers 


Seneca 


Louisville 


Ron Cain 


Franklin County 


Frankfort 


Bob Bennett 


Shawnee 


Louisville 


George E. Sauer 


Franklin-Simpson 


Franklin 


Bob Brown 


Shelby County 


Shelbyville 


Bill Ellis 


Fulton 


Fulton 


Frank McCain 


Shelbyville 


Shelbyville 


Richard Greenwoll 


Fulton County 


Hickman 


Jeff Lester 


Shepherdsville 


Shepherdsville 


Bob Baker 








Somei'set 


Somerset 


Jim Williams 


Gamaliel* 


Gamaliel 


Ray D. Coe 


Southern 


Louisville 


George Bertrim 


Georgetown 


Georgetown 


Duke Owens 


Springfield 


Spingfield 


Charley Kolasa 


Glasgow 


Glasgow 


Lawrence Gilbert 


Stanford 


Stanford 


Rodney Walker 


Greensburg 


Greensburg 


Ivan Curnutte 


Sturgis 


Sturgis 


Ralph Horning 


Hall 

Harlan 

Harr-jon County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 


Grays Knob 

Harlan 

Cynth-ana 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 


Robert Goforth 
Tom Ward 
Bill McKee 
E. G. P.um.-ner 


Temple Hill* 
Thomas Jefferson 
Tompk=nsviIle 
Trigg County 
Trinity 


Glasgow 

Louisville 

To-npkinsville 

Cadz 

Louisville 


Robert Pardue 
J. A. Gray 
Clifton Carter 
Cordon P=»rry 
Charles Quire 


Hazel Green 
Hen-Jerson 


East Bermjtadt 
Henderson 


Hughes Bennett 
William Dawson 


Valley 


Valley Station 


Dallas Arnold 


Henderson County 
Henry Clay 
Kenry County 
Hgh Street 
Hghlands 
Hseville* 
Holmes 
Hopkinsville 


Henderson 
Lex'ngton 
New Castle 
Rowling Green 
Fort Thomas 
HfseviUe 
Covington 
Hopkinsville 


Mojo Hollowell 
Andy Hopkins 
Bill Leedy 
J. S. Ownby 
Owen Hauck 
Jim Manion 
Tom Ellis 
Fleming Thorntor 


Waggener 
Wallins 

Warren County 
Western 
Westport 


Louisville 
Wallins Creek 
Rowling Green 
I,ou-.jvilIe 
Louisville 


Martin De=m 
James L. Howard 
Eck Branham 
Virgil E. Ho'loway 
William Tate 


Wl-eelwright 

Wh-tesbiirg 

Williamsburg 


Wheelwright 

Wnitesburg 

William.sburg 


Ray Brackett 
Gardner Rates 
Archie Powers 








Woodword County 


Versailles 


Bill Wilson 


Irvine 


Irvine 


William Spicer 


Wurtland 


Wurtland 


Joe Robinson 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Page Seven 



SWIMMING COMMITTEE MINUTES 

(Continued from Page Three) 
After some lengthy discussion the committee un- 
animously voted the following recommendations: 

1. The Girls' competition should be classified in 
the same manner as the boys. Schools with 750 or 
more enrollment in the upper four grades would be 
placed in the Class A category. In case of an all- 
male or all-female school, the enrollment should be 
375 studer.its or more. Class B schools would be those 
having an enrollment less than 750 in the upper four 
grades, or the equivalent. 

2. The dates and sites of the 1963-64 meets were 
recommended as: 

Class A meets . . . both boy's and girls' ... to 
be held in Louisville (Since majority of schools in 
this class are in this area, considerable reduction in 
expenses is anticipated ). Dates: February 21, 22, in 
1964. Mr. Craik ad IVIr. Thompson were given the 
responsibility to select the pool (either University 
of Louisville, where pool is under construction, or at 
the Plantation Swim Club pool). 

Class B meets . . . both boys' and girls' ... to be 
held in Lexington at the University of Kentucky Col- 
iseum Pool. Dates: April 3 and 4, 1964. 

3. The events for all classifies tions and competi- 
tions shall be the s?,me. Order and list of events are 
in the current (1964) Swimming Guide of the NCAA. 
This means that there are 11 events. 

The matter of charging admission for the cham- 
pionships was introduced by Mr. Thompson. Though 
there was favorable reaction it was tabled. The re- 
gional plan for conducti.og championships was also 
tabled. It was felt generally that another year could 
tell the committee better of the advisability of using 
the regional plan. The problem lay in the fact that 
pool locations and the distribution geographically of 
participat.vg teams are not in harmony. 

The Cavana award was next discussed. Mr. Sanford 
explained some of the problems in reporting. An in- 
dividual record card system was again discussed. 
Action was taken on the period of gradir.g. The 
motion was made that this period should range from 
June 1 to March 31 of the following year. Seconded. 
Motion passed. Motion made and seconded that a 
school winning Cavana trophy for two successive years 
would be ineligible for the award during the next two 
years. Passed. Adjournment. — Algie Reece 



Registered Basketball Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A.— 1963 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise desig^nated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Abell, James A., 200 Pepper Lane, Paducah, 443-1309, 442-5484 
Adair, Lewis C, 4911 Ronwood Drive, Louisville, 969-7398, 587- 

7631 
Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Road, Louisville, 895-6367, 895- 

0567 
Adk'ns, Bill, Route No. 2, Box 11, De'.ta, Ohio, 6287 
Adkins, Jessie J., Sandy Hook, RE 8-5141 
Adkins, Wendell L., Wallins Creek. MO 4-3544, MO 4-3444 
AkLntj, Charlie, Route No. 2, Cecilia. 862-1911, 765-4186 
Akridge, Dean. Fredonia. 545-3398. 545-3332 
Allen, James D., South Lake Drive, Prestonsburg, BU 5-3442. 

TU 6-3910 
Alexander, Howard S., Crittenden, 824-2854 

Alexander, Rex, 132T Wells Blvd., Murray, PL 3-3579, 762-3056 
Allen, James W., 3444 Monel Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Allen, Lowry R., 812 Old Fort Road, Bowling Green, 842-0236 
Allen, Nelson R., 317 Riverside Dr.. Russell, 836-3242, 324-1456 
Anders, Raleigh A., Route 5, Box 73A, London, 884-5945, 864- 

6877 
Anderson, Donald. Box 41, Chattaroy, W. Va. 



Armstrong, James, 919 11th Ave. No., Nashville, Tenn., CH 

2-6274 
Arnold, Kenneth L., 9606 Seatonville Rd., Fern Creek, 239- 

6446, CE 9-3267 
AuGtin, Wilburn G., 1928 Cherry, Paducah, 443-7071 
Back, Bill, Box 232, Lothair, 436-5456, 436-2500 
Baker, Robert M., Jr., 411 Jean Drive, Danville, 236-2092, 236- 

3691 
Baker, Roger L., 1901 Port Royal, Lexington, 277-7839 
Ballaban, Tom, 1103 Archland, Cincinnati 24, Ohio, 522-3024, 

761-7600 
Bankemper, Thomas, 317 East 7th St., Newport, 681-6047 
Barker, Bob R., 3"04 Bath Ave.. Ashland, 324-5360 
Barker, Walter D., P. O. Box 1411, Friendship, Ohio, EL 3-6690, 

UL 8-1967 
Barton, W. Walter, Route No. 2, Box 303, Corbin, 1922, 9144 
Bates, Cletus, Box 226, Virgie, 639-4519, 639-4446 
Bates, Gardner, Jr., Railroad St., Whitesburg, 633-7174 
Baughn, E. L., 1403 Johnson, Murray, 753-5799, 395-4186 
Beasley, Donald L., Box 112. Dunnville 

Begley, Berlie B., Jr., 9019 Wilson Road., Fort Knox, 4-3379 
Begley, Jack, 1502 Florence, Middletown, Ohio, 423-4279, 422- 

2711 ext. 669 
Bell. Clarence T., 1228 South 41st St., Louisville, 778-7792, 

582-5669 
Bell, Jimmy D., 806 Sunnylane, Murray, 753-2206, 753-9031 
Benedict, Johnny. Box 263, Virgie, 639-4400 
Bennett, Gene, Route No. 2, Wheelersburg, Ohio, PR 6-2655, 

GL 6-4191 
Bennett, Robert K., 123 Winding Way, Frankfort. CA 3-0446, 

CA 3-8248 
Bentley, Jamtu, Shelby Gap 
Benzinger, Joseph, Greenmound Rd., New Richmond. Ohio. 

742-8691. 752-0565 
Berger, John D., Jr., 436-B 9th Ave., Fort Knox, 4-2580, 

4-3424 
Berkeley, Edmund C, Box 284, Wayland, 358-3563 
Bero, James J., Box 968, Williamson W. Va., 
Bisig Roland A.. 2419 Broadmeade Rd., Louisville 5, GL 

4-3797, JU 3-1914 
Blackburn, Adrian, 407 Scott Court, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2401 
Blackburn. Tennyson, Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blackburn. Viley O., 210 College, Somerset. 678-8986, 678-8171 
Blankenship, Zeb, 334 College Manor, Harrodsburg, 734-2464, 

734-4196 
Blanton, Bob, Elm Street, Harlan, 526, 883 
Blanton, Leonard, 8604 Bayou Way, Louisville, 425-3777, EM 

7-6187 
Bocook, Earl, 1102 Beech St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Bocook, George Allen, 1906 Walnut St., Kenova. W. Va. 
Boeskin, F. William, 318 McClelland Ave., St. Bernard 17, 

Ohio, AV 1-6209, 281-2006 
BoBch, Bill, 36 Huntington, Amelia, Ohio, 753-4497 
Bowling, Roy, Fields Lane, London, 864-60"6, 864-2181 
Boyles, Paul, Russell, 836-5497, 836-3141 Ext. 278 
Bradshaw, Frank C, 2)66 E. Gum, Evansville, Indiana. GR 

e-6995, HA 5-6211 
Brashear, Loy Ray, 607 No. Mantle, Elizabethtown, 765-2307, 

Radcliff, Ky., 861-3147 
Brawner, Robert A, 282 Longview Drive, Bowling Green, VI 

3-6648 
Brewer, Clyde U., 415 East Coy Circle, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-6222, Ft. Campbell 3309 
Brewer, Randell, Box 73, London, 864-5608, 864-2107 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 541-6049, 

721-1984 
Bridgeman, John Kay, 212 High, Monticello, 8-2826, 8-2826 
Bridges, Bennie E.. North Middletown, 362-4403, 362-4635 
Bridgman, Don, 409 Ridgewood Ave., Monticello, 348-2742 
Briscoe, Hubert, Route No. 3, Shelbyville, 633-4669, 633-2543 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 5, GL 4-6843, 

Broaddus, William D., Route No. 1, Bloomfield, 262,5702 
Brown, E. C, Fair St., Liberty, 787,4421, 787-4101 
Brown Eddie W., 162 Roberta Ave., Florence, 282,2685 
Brown, 3. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Drive, Danville, 236-3474, 236- 

6516 
Brown, Paul D., Hager Hill, 789-4211, 789-3410 
Brown, Richard A., 972 Tearcee Drive, Lexington, 277-4957, 

256-3880 ext. 322 
Brown, Capt. Richard G., 8 Lacy Lane, Clarksvlile, Tenn., 647- 

5966 
Buis, Nathaniel, Liberty, 787-6714, 787-3291 
Bullock, Teddy, 148 N. Arcadia, Lexington, 264-4200 
Bunn, Harold, 26231/' Collis Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Bunnell, Kenneth L., Munfordville, 524-2361. 524-2321 
Burchett. Lanier, 100 Martin Court, Stanford, 365-2581, 366- 

2126 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796. 

TU 6-2385 
Burkett, Garvis Gene, Nancy, 678-5913, 678-4942 
Burkhart, James G., Loyall 

Burks, Rucker W., P. O. Box 15, Ft. Knox, 4-4066, 4-5655 
Burnett, Richard C. Apt. No. 21 Black Oaks, Paducah, 444- 

6008, 442-1681 
Butcher, Douglas, Meally, 789-4790 
Butcher, Granville, Williamsport 
Butler. Robert, 231 Sagoe, Madisonville. 821-6683 
Butler, Roger K., 544 N Seminary, Madisonville, TA 1-6999 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Butner. Billy M.. 128 Price Court, Lancaster, 792-3503, 792- 

3503 
Byaro, Michael Kirk, 1105 Slashes Road, Lexington, 266-3269, 

266-3269 
Byrd. Harry G., 7331 North Timberlane Dr.. Cincinnati 43, 

Ohio, 661-8745, 561-8745 
Cain, William Ronald. 3038 Wedgewood Way, Louisville, 459- 

2442, 451-4330 
Campbell, George H., Jr., 116 Winchester, Middlesboro, 856, 122 
Campbell, Keller B., 630 S. Gay Place, Lexington, 254-1347, 

252-2200 ext. 3378 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, GL 1-8218, 587- 

8862 
Cantrell, Hubert E., Campton, NO 8-3468, NO 8-3458 
Carnes. Dick, 110 Plenty. New Richmond, Ohio, 742-4172, 742- 

7701 
Carr, Gene P., 3223 Hackworth St. Ashland. 324-8566 
Carr, Martin L., Route No. 3, Cynthiana, 234-3790, 234-3824 
Caruso. Richard A., 1150 Wellspring Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

521-3349, 421- 3300 
Cash, Randall E., 219 Magnolia, Louisville, 634-0956, 367-1721 
Caster, Boyd J., Sheraton Hotel, Louisville, 969-3474, JU 4-4141 
Castle, Jack T.. Route No 2, Pikeville. GE 7-4367 
Cawood, Billy Joe, 417 Ivy, Harlan, 1021, 2620 
Chandler. Jim T.. 160 Thierman Lane, Apt. No. 3, Louitiville 7, 

895-6566, 896-4231 
Chattin, Ernest Patrick, 2147 Central Ave., Ashland, 324-2665, 

324-6191 
Chinn, Mike. Route No. 1 Rockport, Indiana, MI 9-2861, 684-8727 
Cieslack, Albert, Box 97, Richland. Indiana, EL 9-4950 
Clardy, Barry, Route No. 1. Greenville. 928, 928 
Clark, Tom, 430 Spalding Ave.. Lebanon, 692-2034, 692-4578 
Clark, Tom A., Box 112. Russell Springs. 866-7753. 866-2671 
Clemmons, Sam P., 635 Central Ave. Lexington, 255-3662, 252- 

0420 
Click. Bobby, Manton, BU 5-3067, BU 6-3014 
Clusky, Joe, Red Jacket, W. Va. 

Cocran. Roy H., Jr., 305 Gordon, Corbin, 2478, 864-4330 
Coleman, Daniel L., 3 East 41st St., Covington, 261-2388. 

631-6214 
Coleman, James E, Phelps, 456-3408 (Bus.) 
Collier, Burnard, 137 High Street. Pikeville, 7-4344 
Collier, Virgil W., 903 Atkinson St.. Henderson, VA 6-2014 
Collins, Hubert, Nippa, 297-3340. 789-3731 

Colvin, Paul F., Route No. 2. Mayfield, 247-6959, 247-3913 
Combs, Keith A., 1304 MachArthur Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 
OR 7-2869, HA 5-7276 
Combs, W. Eugene, Route No. 2, Box 239, Hazard, 261-2460 

436-5441 
Compton. Ben. Ill Perry St., Louisa, 8-4171 
Conley, George. 2436 Roosevelt Ave.. Ashland. 324-6042 
Conley, Ted L.. 4725 Nottingham Court, Ashland, 325-2920, 

324-6343 
Conn. John D, 4300 Retreat, Louisville, 964-1759, 582-2613 
Cooksey, Marvin, 6905 Orval Dr., Louisville, 969-3585 
Cooper, Hewlett, Hazel Rd.. Murray, 763-3336, 753-3381 
Cooper, Jobn F., 512 East 3rd Street, Augusta, PL 6-4608 
Cooper, Warren. 120 Barber Court. Morehcad, 4-4295. 4-4153 
Cornett, John M.. Carr Creek, 642-3638, 642-3585 
Covey, Kenneth H., 695 Sheridan Drive, Lexington, 277-9532 
Covington. Ralph. 122 Royal Spring, Georgetwon, 108 
Cowle;. Harold M.. Route No. 1. Bowling Green 
Cox. Colin Kelly, Bluegrass, Hazard, 6-3945 
■Crgaer, Bobby F., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2131 
Craig, Randy. 5069 Orange Lawn Dr., Cincinnati 38. Ohio, 

251-6074 
Craig. Ronald. Route No. 2, Versailles. 87.3-6286 
Crawford, Donald. 306 E. Maple, Nicholasville, 885-4751 (Bus.) 
Creech, Harvey J.. Leatherwood, 675-3771, 675-3061 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., 8139 Elbow Lane North, St. 

Petersburg. Florida, 344-7651, 898-2141 
Culp, Ronald D.. 317 Walnut, Bellevue, 261-7834 
Gulp, Willard E.. Box 2402. Clarksville, Tenn., 647-5002. 

Edgoton 439-4313 
Cummin.j, Albert B., P. O. Box 365, Cynthiana, 234-3860, 234- 

4260 
Cummins, Curtis, 289 Hemlock, Benham, 848-2546 
Cumminrj, Ray E., P. O. Box 4, Campton. NO 8-3016 
Curnutte. James, 20! East 8th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dame. L. J.. 2925 McAlister Place, Owensboro, MU 4-5681. 

MU 3-2401 Ext. 395 
Daniels, Bob. Luzerne Road, Greenville. 1228, 146 
Daniels, Robert A.. 214"/, Bridge St., Paintsville, 789-4721 
Daum, Charles. 216 Christ Rd., Evnasville, Indiana, HA 4-0217. 

HA 2-8806 
Davenport, Bowman, Box 62, Clarkson 
Davis, Bunny. 694 W. Lexington, Ave., Danville, 236-2606, 

236-2200 
Davis, Charles, 2735 N. Bend Road, Cincinnati. 541-4177. 

621-5400 Ext. 267 
Davits, Ralph C, 604 North 4th St.. Ironton, Ohio. VE 2-8606 
Davis, Ralph E., 1007 Front. Vanceburg, SW 796-4501. SW 

796-2521 
Davis. William P.. 10-^3 8th St. Huntington, W. Va. 
Dawson. Alby, 345 Harvard, Lexington, 277-9055 
Day, Bill, 105 Adair, Frankfort. 223-8366. 7-9661 Ext. 524 
Dean, Robert C, 7805 St. Andrews Church Rd.. Louisville 
DeGroote, James A.. 2906 E. Mulberry, Evansville, Indiana. OR 

6-6497, HA 4-6481 Ext. 214 



DeMoisey, J. Fox. 227 Highland, Ft. Thomas, 441-0795, 441- 

0795 
Dennedy, Robert, 5083 Orange Lawn Dr., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 
921-3905, 922-2300 

Denney, Murrell C, Route No. 3, Eubank, 379-3502, 379-4440 
Denton, Charles, Route No. 3, Henderson, VA 6-4020, VA 

6-9533 
Denton, Walter L., 1968 Rodes Dr., Bowling Green, 842-1279 
Derrickson, Richard. 621 Cardinal Lane, Lexington, 277-4657, 

252-7847 
Doll, Louis E., 4426 Reading Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 731-9281, 

761-4210 
DeVary, Bill. 217 Hickman, Wincht.jter, PI 4-6114 
Dial, Charles R., 330 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine St., Cincinnati 19. Ohio, 281-0136, 

281-9264 
Divine, J. Ralph, Route No. 1, Bremen. 988M2 
Divine, Wayne L., Route No. 1. Bremen, Central City 988M2 
Dobson, Kenneth, Route No. 3. Paducah, 442-0778, 443-4534 
Dodge, Bruce B., Jr.. 1004 Franelm Rd., Louisville, 361-2027, 
JU 3-4441 
Dodson, Winston, 213 Greenbriar Rd., Lexington, 277-2698, 

252-2260 
Dorsey, James. 1110 Gilsey Ave., Cincinnati 6, Ohio. 471-8060 
Dotson, John B., 504 McKinney Rd., Vincennes, Indiana, TU 

2-8095, TU 2-8480 
Dotson, W. S.. 432 East 6th St.. Lexington, 261-6131, 264-0350 
Downing, David M., 937 He»j Lane, Louisville, 637-4838. 

363-2437 
Drahman, Thomas. W., 116 8th St., Dayton. 431-1203 
Drake, Richard R., 61 Edwards Court, Ft. Thomas, 441-4235 
Draughn, Bartram, Hindman. 786-6337 

Driskell, Earl. Jr., 918 Stone St., Louisville, 634-3591, SP 4-6781 
Driver, Bobby, Route No. 4. Glasgow, GA 7-2475 
Duerson. William Robert, Box 480, Lancaster, 792-2459 (Bus,) 
Duff, Birchell, Garrett, 358-3001, 358-3271 
Duff, Earl, 218 Lyttle Blvd., Hazard, 6-2725, 6-3136 
Dunaway, Adrain. 246 Cumberland Ave., Barbourville. 546-3694 
Duvall, Larry, East Adair, Owenton, 484-2444, 484-3202 
Duvall, Thomas Jay, Sr., 6106 Doyle Drive, Louisville 16, 447- 

3032, ME 7-1421 Ext. 228 
Dykes, Larry. 232 Hard'ng St.. Danville, 236-5853 
Eadffli, Jimmy, South Carrollton, 481-J 

Eaton, James M., 2016 Merriewood Dr., Owensboro, 864-1188 
Edelen, Ben R., 2842 Klondike Lane, Louisville, GL 4-3518, 

GL 2-2611 
Edmiston, Raymond L., 442 Weldon Ave., Madisonville, TA 

1-6567. TA 1-3463 
Edwards. Don. 119 E. Main, Box 317, Sebree, 835-7537, 835 

7592 
Elkin, William Thomas, Route No. 1. Jonesville, 823-8768 (Bus.) 
Elkins. R. Percy, Elkhorn Ave., Jenkins, 068 (Bus.) 
Ellington. James E., 3621 Cherry Tree Lane, Box 193, Erlanger, 

341-8107, 581-7946 
Ellis, Johnny, Praitonsburg, 6-2751. 6-3080 
Elrod, William Turner, 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 2-5110, 

2-0341 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ensslin, Charles W.. Barbourville. 6-3770. 6-3276 
Ernst, Edward R., Box 244. Erlanger, 921-8336, 689-7181 
Evans, Wade Elmo, 215 Brockton, Richmond, 623-2894 
Everett, Billy Norman, Fairview. TU 5-3887 
Ezell, Clendon G., Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, TU 6-7606, TU 

6-15.SS 
Fairchild, Kenton, Inez, 298-3295 

Fandrich. William, Route No. 4. Murray, PL 3-3193 
Farley, Jimmy, W. Jefferson. Berea, 986-4464 
Fenton, Don J., 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati 27, Ohio, 271- 

3792, 751-4343 
Ferguson. Thomas L., 922 Lee St.. Barboursville, W. Va. 
Ferrell, Jimmy L.. 219 Cedar St.. Glasgow. 651-3661 
Fish, Leiand G., 826 Oakhill, Lexington, 255-7166, 266-7741 
Flynn, Bobbby, 1708 Charleston Ct., Lexington, 299-6902, 255- 

5188 
Flynn, Reynolds, 1161 Hamilton Road, Park Hilfe, Covington, 

581-9837, 431-4080 
Ferrell, Doctor, 409 Greenbriar, Lexington, 277-4273, 252-4"S0 
Finley, Albert R., Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, 886-4108, 886- 

8335 
Fort, John W., A.P.S.C, Clarksville, Tenn., 645-2656, Ft. 

Campbell 4918 
Foster, Berryman, 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 255-7783. 252- 

7847 
Foster, Bob. Science Hill, 423-8683, Somerset 678-8161 
Fowler, Charles L., 6214 Woodhill Lane, Louisville, 969-0369, 

454-7611 Ext. 513 
Fox, David. McKee. 287-2274- 287-2274 
Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Drive. Henderson, VA 7-3232 
Francis, Fred Louis, 643 College Station, Murray, 762-3582 
Frazer, Tom Roe, Route No. 1, Sturgis, 333-4412, 333-4672 
Fredericks. Rex, Bernstadt, VO 4-2765 
FreeBe, Oliver T., 5618 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio LO 

1-5398, ME 1-2296 
Fulkerson. James R., 1611 Navajo Dr., Owensboro, MU 4-6458 
Fuller, John R., Jr., Route No. 8 Epperson Rd., Paducah, 898- 

3U5- 443-6626 
Fultz, Jack, Box 636, Olive Hill, 326-3661, 326-4691 
Furgerson, William, 703 South 16th St., Murray, 753-1336, 762- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Page Nine 



Gaddis, George M., 529 Monterry Dr., Owensboro, 684-5611, 

Gaither, Gene, Box 103, Beaver Dam, 274-3885, 274-388B 

Gaither, Jack, Rockport, 274-4357, 274-3661 

Gambill, Roger A., Blaine. OL 2-3164 

Gardner, Howard. McCullum, Elizabethtown, 765-6273, Ft. 

Knox 4-6638 
Gentile, Robert Michael, 3103 Rose Lawn Blvd., Louisville, 

GL 8-7340, GL 8-7340 
Gentry, Charles C., Route No. 1, Dak Grove, Tenn., 89-431- 

3405, 89-431-3440 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Road, Lexington, 266-4801, 

252-0410 
Gilbert, Gerald L., Tunnel Hill Road, Elizabethtown, 765-6704, 

Ft. Knox 4-7719 
Gilbert, Gordon J., 301 Brookwood, Hamilton, Ohio, 892-3678 
Gilbert, Lawrence, 113 Cardinal Court, Glasgow, 678-6433, 

651-2256 
Gill. Joe, 455 Marimon. Harrodsburg, 734-2729, 734-4195 
Gillespie, Robert C, No. 8 Wilana Court, Pikeville, 7-7934, 

7-7190 
Oilman, Ronald R., Delbarton, W. Va. 

Giordano, Al, 107 Ratlift. Princeton. 5-5680, EM 5-5615 
Goins, Edgar S., Route No. 1 Box 130, Drakt'jboro, GR 6-2225 
Coins, Homer H., Evarts, 837-2869 
Golden, Billy Joe, 668 E. Main St. Lynch, 848-2512 
Goldey, William H. 463 Crestview, Henderson, VA 7-3622, VA 

Goley, Jim, Cayton Rd., Florence, 283-2009. 431-8335 

Goodall. Walter. 820 Park Ave., Newport. 291-9470, 261-3313 

Gorence, John P., 2506 Standard, Louisville, SP 6-5719, SP 

6-8556 
Gossett. John P., 1113 Maple, Ashland, 324-2294, 324-5138 
Gour, Bob, 244 Audubon, Bowling Green, 843-9682, VI 2-0341 

Ext. 241 
Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord, Evansville 11. Indiana, 

GR 6-6191, UN 7-2466 
Cover. David B., Bronston. 661-4573, 661-4260 
Graves. Preston H., Marrowbone, 864-3604 
Greathouse, Bobby R., Route No. 3, Bowling Green, 842-3965, 

843-3362 
Grig-jby, Peter. Jr., McDowell, 377-2356, 377-6202 
Haekel. John C, Jr., 3409 Burrell Dr., Louisville 16, 447-7192 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Rd.. Lexington, 255- 

5332, 262-7866 
Hagan, Joe, 3000 Sherbrooke Rd., Louisville, 458-1325 
Hagen, William R., 266!) Banning Rd. Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

522-0647 KI 1-1800 Ext. 1020 
Haines, William E., 901 Bellefonte Rd.. Flatwood, 836-5396, 

Louisa. Ky. 638-4277 
Hale. James J.. South Main. Williamstown. 824-8662 
Hamm, L. E.. Route No. 3, Box 249, Mayfield, MA 3-3277, 

CH 7-5670 
Hammons, Norman, Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, 5-5914 
Hampton. Ray, 505 Wayne Drive, Hopkinsvlile, 886-3591, 886- 

6919 
Harden, Joseph C. Route No. 1. Hardin 
Hardin, Jack H., 1105 B Street, Ceredo. W. Va. 
Hardin. William R.. Box 171. Inez, 298-3568, 298-3685 
Harned. Victor, 212 W. Walnut, Leitchfield 
Harp, Kenneth R., 2041 Coburn Blvd.. Lexington, 266-3378 
Harper, Bruce D., Route No. 5. Lexington, 266-6142, 266-6142 
Harris. Billy, Cleaton. 759-R2, 46 
Hatfield, Cecil E., Box 2676, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hatfield, Dennis G., 1610 May St., Covington, 431-4234, MA 

1-6576 
Hatfield. James. McCarr, GA 7-8762 
Hatter, Frank, 4211 Lafayette Court, Erlanger, 341-6139, 621- 

6491 
Hatter, Jack. 1654 Am-sterdam Rd., Covington, 331-2444, 421- 

9817 
Hawkins, Will A.. Box 203. Cedar Hill. Tenn., 2941 
Hayden, Samuel J.. Fancy Farm, 623-3641, 623-9111 
Hedge, David W.. 321 Mockingbird Dr., Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

BU 2-2242 
Heitzman, Warren E., 7291 Memory Lane, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

521-7531. 761-4100 Ext. 3551 
Heldman, Dr. John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville, 363-2181, 

637-2531 
Hendon, Charles. Route No. 1, Mayfield, 328-3338 
Hendon. L. J. 106 S. 12th St., Murray, PL 3-3658, PL 3-2825 
Hendricks. Dudley, 631 Beaumont Ave.. Harrodsburg 
Hennegan, Michael, 823 E. Maple, Jeffersonville, Indiana, BU 

2-5079, BU 2-1351 
Henry. Donald E.. Box 425, Cumberland, 589-2288 
Herold, Clarence E., Route No. 1, Sacramento, 626-6666 
Hertzberger, Robert E., 1310 Terrace Ave., Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 4-1681. HA 5-6211 
Hewitt, R. T., 813 Sharp St.. Murray, 753-5435, 762-4391 
Hill, Clyde E.. Box 117, Williamsburg, 3171 
Hill, Earl F., Route No. 6, Box 141-A, London, 864-2621, 864- 

2128 
Hinton. Henry, Jr., 3702 Susan, Louisville 19. 969-2873 
Hitt, Billy D., Route No. 2, Mayslick. 763-2608. 664-5327 
Hobbs, Fred L., 501 Warwick Drive. Owensboro, 683-8209, 

683-2401 
Hobltj, William Paul, 1665 Ryan Ave., Murr— PL 3-5614 
Hobby, Bill, 907 Mechanic, Princeton, EM 5-6i95, EM 5-2051 
Hodge, Fred A., 2011 Joyce Ave., Evansville, Indiana, GR 

7-2993, 4-6411 



Hoffeld, Bernie E., 172 Ruby Rd., Lexington, 255-0494, 252- 

2250 Ext. 2770 
Hofsetetter, Joe, Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hogan, Waymon, Route No. 1, Franklin 
Holden, Frye H., 142 Tennyson Dr., Owensboro, 683-7814, 

683-4561 
Holeman, Bill R., 103 Locust St. Manchester. 598-2999 
Holman. S. T., 207 2nd St. Corbin, 2752, 283 
HoUis, Wylie. 314 Shawnee Drive, Louisville. SP 6-0869, JU 

4-1341 
Holt, Glenn, Jamestown, 343-2181, 343-7511 
Holtzclaw, James R., Route No. 4, Hustonville, 346-2494, 

Burgin. Ky. 748-5473 
Hook, B. B., Jr., Route No. 5 Paducah, 443-4610, 443-3738 
Horton, Aldrich, Box 47, Greenville, 1646 
Howard, Bruce, Morton Lane, South Shore 
Howard, Jimmy D.. 1932 Madison, Paducah, 443-1333, 442- 

1649 
Hubbs, C. L., 319 South Main, Eminence, 845-7111, 846-4071 
Huber, Jerry, 29 Eaut Fourth, Covington, 681-0897, 431-5346 
Hudnall, William E., 313 Creekview Dr., Paris, 987-1641, 

Georgetown, Ky. 2022 
Hudson, Oscar, Box 32. Sassafras. 436-3858, 436-2141 
Huff, Cordell, 116 Poplar, Berea, 986-4621 (Bus.) 
Huggins, Jim, 351 Sumpter. Bowling Green. 842-5619, 842-6303 
Huiet, Fred, 7241 Longtield, Maderia 43, Ohio, 561-9239, 241- 

4768 
Hummer, Irby, 206 College, Hodgenville. 358-3009. 368-30') 
Hunley. Neil P., 368 Main St., West Liberty, SH 3-3131, SH 

3-4581 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hutehens. Jim, Box 103, Belfry, 237-1204, 353-7362 
Hutchinson, Jack T., Martin, BU 5-3427 

Hyatt, Bob, 634 South 3rd St.. Louisville, JU 7-8611 (Bus.) 
Hyland, Frank Dixon, Box 465, South Webster, Ohio, PR 8-2401, 

Waverly, Ohio 947-2171 Ext. 2165 
Hynson, Fred R., 2056 St. Christopher, Lexington, 266-4285. 

254-1898 
Inman, Briscoe. Centre College, Danville. 236-5740, 236- 

6211 Ext. 26 
Irwin, Charles, Route No. 1, Hopkinsville. TU 6-4820, TU 

6-4820 
Jackson, Roy T.. E. Webster, Sebree, TE 6-2238 
Jahnigen, Robert E., 6007 Red Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio, 791-2345 
James, Carl Eddie, 9404 Ponder Lane, Valley Station, WE 

7-3726 
James, Gene, 10161/. South 6th St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6976, 

JE 2-6224 
Jenkins, Kean, 210MorninEside, Elizabethtown, 765-4887, 765- 

4606 
Johnson, Jack D.. McKinney, 346-3856, 346-9251 
Johnson, James L., Irvington, 547-2812 

Johrason. James M., 632 Blade, Frankfort, CA 7-7639, CA 3-8359 
Johnson, Stanley W., 2115 Ottawa. Owensboro, 684-2167 
Johnson, Vernon Lee, Jr., Highway 27, Falmouth, 664-6771, 

654-5771 
Johnson, William Bernard, Route No. 7, Hopkinsville, AM 

9-2208. TU 5-6366 
Joiner, Russell D., Tiline, 928-4672, 928-4731 
Jones, Boyer, 437 Jackson St., Campbellsville, 465-5963 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, GL 

JoncB, Denver, Box 272, Hazard, 436-3728 

Jones, Carson G., 713 N. Main St., Evansville, Indiana. HA 

2-3069, 4-7741 Ext. 360 
Jones, Daniel R., Cleaton. 436-J, 497 

Jones, Joseph, 7303 Rockwood Rd., Louisville. 969-5898 
Jones, Paul, 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown. 765-4602, Fort 

Knox 4-7117 
Jordan, Larry E., 1025 Smith St., Milton, W. Va. 
Jordan. Raymond A., Box 23, Ona, W. Va. 
Junker. Edwin G., 1045 W. Seymour, Cincinnati 16. Ohio, 

821-4117 
Kaler, Jerry Don, 620 South 21st St., Paducah, 444-7950 
Keene, Marcum. Biggs, 836-2267, 836-2286 
Kellcy, Capt. Victor B.. 6882-B Adams. Ft. Knox, 4-1471 
Kensler, Orville A., 90310, Estrada, Ft. Knox. 4-3882, 4-4251 
Kercher, Norman L., 3126 Marlin Rd., Louisville, GL 2-2969, 

GL 2-2969 
KoBsler, Robert H., 6208 Fegenbush Lane, Louisville, 239-3884, 

583-3604 
Key, Calvin, Hazel, 492-3431, 492-2341 
Eimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, GR 6-2656 
King, James A., 6000 Clarmar, Route No. 3, Jeffersontown, 

239-8016. 776-2466 
Kingsbury, G. William, Jr., 210 Edgcwood Rd., Ft. Mitchell, 

Covington. 331-1239 
Kirtley, Richard B., 406 W. Main, Central City, 1324 
Kitchens, Mike, 718 East 11th St., Bowling Green, VI 3-4521 
Kloufetos. Spiro J., 55 La Salle Place, Louisville 10, 778-6352 
Knight, Bill, 52 N. 36th St., Paducah, 443-2775, 443-2775 
Knight, Gary, 601 Mgt. Hgts., Paintsville. 789-4808 
Knhl, Lawrence, Box 207, Middlesboro, 2988, 866 
Kuster, William, 633 17th St., Tell City, Indiana, KI 7-2109 
Lankert, Norman E., 307 N. Sherwood, Clarksville, Indiana, 

BU 2-3368 
Lawson, Rondell, Garrett, Area Code 606 358-3531 
Larsen, George, 7850A, Ectrada, Ft. Knox, 4-3484, 4-8611 
Laubheimer, Donald Travis, 3520 Henry Ave. Louisville 15, 

366-3880, JU 4-0133 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Alvin L.. 21>/. Alta Vista, Walton, 485-4643, DU 

1-2000 Ext. 488 
Lay, William B., 1621 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 252-6829, 252-2250 
Leahy. Pat, 1819 Ratcliffe, Louisville, SP 6-6368, JU 7-1121 

Ext. 422 
Lee, Robert L., 6810 Dartmoor Drive, Louisville 22, 425-3863, 

895-2431 
Leonhardt, Donald. Route No. 5. Evansville. Indiana. UN 7-5217 
Lewis. Charles Odell. Route No. 6. Bowling Green. VI 2-9230 
Lewis. Maxwell L.. Box 262. Kenova. W. Va. 
Lillie. William Westly, 1320 Barret, Louisville, 451-0562. 582- 

2658 
Lindsey. Jack. Box 36. Blackey. 633-7755 

List. Frank A... Route No. 3. Owenuboro, 683-6569, 684-5285 
Little, Bernard, P. O. Box 24. Hi Hat, 377-6231, 377-6231 
Long, Marshall. Route No. 3. Shelbyville. ME 3-3213. ME 

3-31S1 
Long, W. G.. 209 Idlewylde Dr.. Louisville 6. TW 5-8731, 582- 

2613 
Loudy. Kenneth. Slemp, 675-4278 
Lowe, Eugene T.. Route No. 6, Box 28. London, 864-5724, 864- 

2207 
Lucas, Gene T.. 100 Lemons Mill Road. Georgetown. 1371. 19 
Lusby. George H.. 504 Clinton. Georegtown. 678-W, 1334 
Lykins, Joe D., Malone, SH 3-2428 

Lyons, Charles S.. Route No. 2. Sharpsburg. CH 7-2457 
McAnelly. David F.. Liberty. 787-6525, 787-6571 
McBee. William K., Burlington, 586-6462, 241-2310 
McBrayer. Don. 516 Greenup. Raceland. 836-8857 
McCargo. Frank J.. 1713 East 9th St.. Hopkinsville. 886-1948. 

885-9400 
McCarter. Bobby. 11 Concord Drive, Clarksville, Tenn. 647- 

3170. 439-6211 Ext. 3320 
McCowan. Connell. Route 1. Box 251. Corbin. 2361 
McGehee. Gordon. 4529 Carroll, Covington. 261-6880 
McGlaason. Galen. 212 North Bend Rd.. Hebron. 689-7330, 689- 

7342 
McCoy. Hayse. Inez. 298-3417. 298-3417 

McGlone. Maurice B., 602 Maple Ave., Falmouth, 654-8259 
McGlothlin, Leonard, 1912 Mt. Vernon Dr., Owensboro, 864- 

7065, 683-2401 Ext. 518 
McLaughlin, Robert L., 3914 E. Gatewood Lane, Cincinnati 

36, Ohio, 793-2449, 241-1822 Ext. 293 
McLean, Gordon. Cody. MI 2-3326 
McMurtry. 317 Lynwood Circle, Springfield. Tenn.. 384-3337. 

645-9035 
McNamee. Jack. 3616 Muddycreek. Cincinnati. Ohio. 922-5207 
McNeely. Albert T.. 501 Leslie Ave.. P. O. Box 203. Glasgow, 

651-3290. Ft. Campbell 465-8168 
McPike. Ray S.. Jr.. 309 Theatre Bldg.. 629 South 4th St.. 

Louisville 2. 451-3832, 385-2832 
Mace, Glen. 590 Cedar St.. Scottsburg. Indiana, 752-1133 
Macy, Lowell Z., Hardinsburg. 756-5281. 756-2166 
Madden. McElroy. 463 Lindingberg Dr.. Lexington, 255-6504 
Madon, Robert Lee, 215 Tennessee Ave., Box 47. Pineville, ED 

7-2135. ED 7-2135 
Mahan. Carle E.. Hampton Manor, Winchester. 744-4559, Lex- 
ington 252-0290 
Marsili. Lee. 1045 Gap Branch. Lynch. 848-5673 
Martin. Charlie. Sharpsburg. CH 7-2141. CH 7-2611 
Martin. Woody. Morgantown. 728-2155. 728-2301 
Mastin, Daryl. Route No. 1. Mt. Olivet 
Matthewj. Dr. Lyle. 105 Albany Road. Monticello. 348-3066, 

348-3286 
Mauney. B.li. 300 Vaught St.. Somerset. 678-8280 
May. E. B.. Jr.. Box 85, Prestonsburg. 886-3414. 886-8661 
Mayer. John P.. 112 Ashmore. Versailles. 873-5225. 873-4741 
Maynard. Andrew J., Matewan, W. Va. 
Maynard. Joe E.. 809 Nesbitt Dr.. Madison. Tenn.. UN 8-9241, 

TW 5-6976 
Mays, Raymond K., 104 Samuels Ave., Barboursville. W. Va. 
Meade, Foster, Box 63, South Portsmouth, YE 2-3584, YE 

2-3221 
Meeks, Jack, 407 .5th St.. Corbin. 415. 20 

Melmige. Jamc'j. Jr.. Apt. No. 6. M & S Courts. South William- 
son. W. Va. 
Melton. Robert. 415 Meadow St.. Henderson. VA 7-3067, VA 

7-1838 
Messerian. Nishan. 175 East Third Ave.. Williamson. W. Va. 
Metcalf. Earl L.. 3441 Lovelaceville Rd.. Paducah. 442-1359 
Meyer. Bud. 5319 Lilibet Court. Cincinnati 28. Ohio. 922-3459. 

721-4334 
Mickey. Elbert W.. Box 2171. Williamson. W. Va. 
Middleton. Johnny. 102 Westfield. Richmond. 623-1682 
Miller. Claude O.. 704'/. 10th Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Miller. William Jack. 2340 Huber Road. Louisville 16. SP 4-1728. 

58-2-3511 Ext. 305 
Millerhaus. W. J.. 923 Harris. Cincinnati 5. Ohio. OR 1-7904, 

WA 1-9722 
Miracle, Orville. 531 Kentucky Ave.. Pineville. ED 7-3492. 

ED 7-2329 
Mitchell, Emmett, 120 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 255-3511, 

254-0032 
Mitchell, William N., 6711 Green Meadow Court, Louisville 

7. 895-0888. ME 7-4494 
Moll. Francis B.. 820 Mulberry, Mt. Vernon, Indiana, PC 

3-2870. PO 3-4489 
Monahan. Ed.. 6629 Plantation Way. Cincinnati 24, Ohio, 521- 

6582, 681-8300 
Montgomery. Joe, Mt. Olivet. Carlisle, Ky., 574JI 



Morse. Richard K., 163 No. Deepwood. Radcliff. 351-3748. Fort 

Knox 4-4454 
Moss, Julian, 106 Dickerson Court, Lancaster, 792-2954, 792- 

2711 
Montgomery, Gordon D., 112 Hustonville Rd., Danville, 236- 

3116, 236-5753 
Moore, James E., Route No. 5, Box 91A, London, 864-2054, 864- 

6018 
Moore, Robert, 441 Forest. Erlanger, 341-6837. 431-2174 
Moser. Rudy Clay, Route No. 2, Sebree. 639-6317 
Mulligan. J. T., 427 Center St., Erlanger. 341-5628. 341-5628 
Munrath. Roy A.. 932 John St.. Covington. JU 1-2759. DU 

1-2200 Ext. 2416 
Murphy. Donald J.. 8875 Long Lane, Cincinnati 5, Ohio, 931- 

3189, 931-3189 
Murphy, Leo T., Jr.. 222 McCready. Louisville 6, 897-2277, 

458-2281 
Murphy. Phil J., 4143F Lee Village, Ft. Campbell, 439-4447, 

439-5211 Ext. 4823 
Murrell. Allen L.. 804 Woodhurst, Bowling Green, 842-1286. 

Franklin, Ky.. 586-4731 
Nash. Tom. Jr.. 149 Preston Ave., Lexington, 266-5414 
Neal, Gene. 3648 SR 132. Route No. 1, Batavia. Ohio. 281-4630, 

753-6908 
Nefeon. William O.. Route No. 1. Greenville. 1161M 
Nevrton. C. M.. 2041 Dellwood Drive. Lexington. 277-2865, 

255-2960 
Nickell, Carl Duane, 2009 Broad St.. Paducah. 444-6095 
Nixon. James W.. 2713 Canton St.. Hopkinsville. TU 6-2641, 

439-5211 Ext. 4897 
Noel, John, 2004 Harrison Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 661-8613 
Noland, Robert D., 212 Berkely, Evansville. Indiana. HA 

2-8708. GL 6-1357 
Nord. Ed. 1734 South 23rd St.. Louisville. 774-1958, 895-3401 

Ext. 202 
Oldham. John H.. Route No. 1, Box 79A. Prospect, CA 8-1698 
Omer, Harold G., 160 N. Crestmoor. Louisville 6, TW 6-4170, 

SP 8-4421 Ext. 206 
O'Nan. Harold L.. 1927 Washington, Henderson. VA 6-4898 
Orr. George K.. Hq. Co.. U. S. Army, Ft. Meyer, Va., 942- 

2371, 942-2371 
Osborne. Robert Happy. Box 333. Pineville. 337-3829. 337-2329 
Owens. Charles C. Jr.. 2635 Guyan Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Owenu. Vermont. 132 Laurel, Pineville, 7-2406. 7-2329 
Pack. Donald. Box 145. Fleming, 855-7708. 855-2391 
Pack. James W.. Catlettsburg, 739-6250, 324-1111 Ext. 526 
Padgett. R. K., 2021.'. College, Somerset, 678-6485, 678-4141 
Pardue, Robert E., 221 Shelley Dr., Glasgow, 651-2456, 427-2611 
Park, J. M., P. O. Box 299, Paducah, 898-2786 
Parker, Billy E.. P. O. Box 731. Pineville. 337-3293 
Parrott. Larry L.. 202 Bibb St.. Campbellsville 
Patmore. Robert J.. P. O. Box 32. Rockport. Indiana. MI 

9-4072, MI 9-4111 
Paulin. Al. 638 Franklin. Tell City. Indiana. KL 7-3323. KL 

7-3323 
Pearson. Bobbv Neal. Beechmont 

Peeno. Harry R.. 30 Butler St.. Ludlow. JU 1-7336 
Pelkey. Stanley, 215 Watt, Jeffersonville, Indiana, BU 2-3570 

(Bus. I 
Pelphrey, Jack, Box 64, Paintsville, 789-4206 
Pelphrey, James R., 235 Washington Ave., Box 54, Paintsville, 

789-6287, 789-6391 
Penner, Merritt D.. Jr.. Box 528, Route No. 2. Manchester, 

598-4098 
Pergrem. Bernard. 3315 Pine Haven Dr., Achland, 324-7664, 

324-1155 Ext. 288 
Perry, James E., Route No. 6, Paducah, 443-6740, 444-7251 
Petett, Frank M.. 109 Floral Drive, Glasgow, 651-2574, 651-2266 
Phelps, Bruce N.. Luda. Russell Springs, 866-2455 
Phelps. David, Box 76. Science Hill. 423-3410 
Phelps, Ray. Box 533. Russell, 836-3670 
Phillips, William, Route No. 3. Paducah. 443-2916 
Pickett. Robert. Ill 2nd St.. Greensburg. 932-5421, 932-5231 
Ping, Denton. Route No. 3, Box 78, Somerset 
Points, Chark'j, 414 Swan Circle, Elsmere, 341-9740, 341-7850 
Porter, Albert Clark, Morgantown, LA 6-3414, LA 6-5141 
Prather, Edwin Eugene. Route No. 1. LaGrange, 279-5153, 

241-8491 
Preece, Boyce C. Box 544. Kermit. W. Va. 
Preece. John C. Box 355. Kel-mit. W. Va. 
Price. Charles, 3445 13th St., Ashland, 325-3854, 324-3177 
Price, James E., Liberty, 787-6242, 787-4351 
Prichard, Glenn W., Crum, W. Va. 

Quigg, Ben F., Third St., Livermore. 278-2520. 278-2522 
Rainey. Jimmy. 16 Phillips Court. Winchester. 744-4028 
Rains. Richard. 2328 Alden Court, Covington, 291-4163 
Ramey, Herbert Dean, Farmers, ST 4-5153 
Ramey, John D.. 113 Myrtle Ave.. North Vernon. Indiana, FI 

9-7645 
Randall, H. C, Box 227, Columbia, 384-2843, 384-2851 
Rapp, William. 215 Heplar St.. Ironton. Ohio. JE 2-1983 
Rawlings, Harold. 182 E. Park, Radcliff. 351-3249. Ft. Knox 

4-3277 
Ray, Roberts Russell, Route No. 3, Cave City 
Redman. Malvern G.. Route No. 3. Mt. Vernon. Indiana. SU 

3-2561 
Reed. Charles R.. 102 Elizabeth. Versailles. 873-4213, Lexington 

254-6554 
Reed, Gordon, 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas, 441-4946, 

541-4607 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Page Eleven 



Reed, William F., 105 Irvine Road, Lexington, 266-3839. 255- 

6010 
Reinhardt, Myron Stanley, 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft., 

Thomas. 441-3730, 697-9731 
Renfro, John Edwin, 445 Florence. Williamsburg, 6488, 6808 
Rhodes, Cecil, Box 808, Barbourville, LI 6-3084 
Riggins, Jason, Box 2591, Williamson, W. Va. 
Ring, William H.. 244 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 252-6511, 

255-2110 
Ritter. Goebel, 132 Main St., Whitesburg, 633-7164, 633-2339 
Roach, Earl Wilton, Star Route, Mayfield, 247-6078, Fulton, 

Ky. 2080 Ext. 62 
Roberts, Donald G.. Harrodsburg, 734-4765, 734-3673 
Robert's, Louis. 600 Seneca Ave., Louisville. 363-4139 
Robertson. William R.. 121 Main St., Springfield, 336-7154, 

336-9963 
Robinson, Don L., 1906V. Walnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Robinson. Pearl, 363 Wayne St., Manchester, 598-2691, 698- 

3541 
Rodgers, Tom H., 360 Caroline, Madisonville, 821-7312, 821-6520 
Roeckers, Bernie, 803 Loda Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 752-1140, 

831-5100 
Rogers, Carl E., Corinth, 824-6671 
Rogers. Howard, D., 17 Maryland Ave., Winchester, 744-1785, 

Lexington, 299-1221 Ext. 2231 
Roller, Otis C, 808 Chambery Dr., Louisville 7. TW 5-6356, 

JU 7-1121 Ext. 302 
Rolph, Harold J.. 915 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-4036, 

532-3231 
Rose, Lee H., 686 Springhurst Dr., Lexington, 277-7657. 255- 

2960 Ext. 281 
Rubarl'3, Leland G., Dunnville, 787-7500, 787-7562 
Rupert. Ray, 3185 Arrowhead, Lexington, 254-9306, 277-4481 
Russell, Allen, 1503 Sycamore, Murray, PL 3-2832 
Russell, Eugene, 1106 Gallia St., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 

3-7653, EL 3-2103 
Russell, Joe, Box 213, Russellville, 726-6983, 726-6983 
Russman, Godfrey F., 1041 Goss Ave.. Louisville. 635-7426. 

635-7426 
Sallee, Alan L., 1737 Deer Park, Louisville, GL 1-6478, 368- 

9248 
Salisbury. Franklin D., Box 402, Martin, 285-3375 
Salyer, Jesse B., Flat Gap. 265-2892 
Sander, Richard, 209 Parkway, Cincinnati. Ohio. VA 1-7314. 

541-1800 
Sanders. Mel. 3910 Sunset Ave., Paducah, 442-3650, 443-5800 
Sang. Bob, 4312 Gartin Ave., Ashland, 324-4814 
Saturley, David W., Route No. 6, Hopkinsville, TU 5-8395, 

TU 6-3311 Ext. 204 
Schad, Jim, 10717 Chelmsford Road, Cincinnati 40, Ohio, 825- 

3343 
Saylor, Lanny Ross, Wallins Creek, MO 4-3518. 277 
Schlich. Paul. 3315 Dean Drive. Louisville. GL 8-6765. TW 

6-0211 
Schnebelt. Carl R., Hanover. Indiana. 866-3581. 866-4561 
Schneider. Robert. 326 W. 19th St.. Covington, 441-7100, 431- 

7395 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald Rd., Lexington. 252-3316. 252-3595 
Scott, Clarence T., Wallins Creek. MO 4-2181, MO 4-3444 
Scott, Donald, Red Bird MisBion. Beverly. ED 7-3300 
Scott. Emmanuel H.. 1614 Potter Place. Cincinnati 7. Ohio. 

281-6928 
Scale. William E., 320 Tulane. Lexington. 277-9415, 255-3600 

Ext. 2872 
Sears. Wilson, 134 Ilhardt Ave., Nicholasville, 885-5948 
Sebestin, John. P. O. Box 237. Omar. W. Va. 
Sellier. Ed. 135 Hamilton Park, Lexington, 255-6215, 277-5122 
Sellman, John B., 4031 Oilman Ave., Louisville 7, 897-2757, 

JU 2-2021 
Settle, Roy G., 1618 Sioux Place, Owensboro, MU 3-213G, 

MU 3-3571 
Sexton, Steven C, Box 354, Whitesburg, 633-2339 (Bus.) 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370, 548-2208 
Shelton. David S., 5311 Elmhurst Dr., Evansville, Indiana, OR 

7-4686, GR 7-5381 
Shewmaker. Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Drive, Clarksville, Tenn.. 

647-4112 
Shirley, Henry. 1401 Fairdale Road, Fairdale, 368-3250, 778- 

2731 Ext. 430 
Shirley, Michael D., Jr., 1306 Fairdale Rd., Fairdale, EM 

6-3028 
Shope, Lowell M., Mittendorf St., South Webster, Ohio. PR 

8-2425. BL 9-5601 
Showalter. John. 116 Military, Georgetown, 662-1240 
Shuck. Thomac G., Box 822, 1424 South Lime, Lexington, 254- 

8007, 254-0593 
Singleton, Vesper, Hindman, ST 5-5201, ST 5-5361 
Shumate, Robert T., 2802 Rosina, Covington, 431-7672. DU 

1-7000 
Siler. Clarence M.. 202 South 8th St., Williamsburg, 6188 
Siler, Ernest Lee, Verne 
Singleton, Bobby, 8010 Terry Lane. Pleasure Ridge Park, WE 

7-4712 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville 18, 458-1286, 

366-0396 
Smith. Elijah, Route No. 2, Pineville, ED 7-3750 
Smith, Joe N., Beechmont 
Smith, Thomas W., 2915 Sheldon Road, Louisville, 458-3934, 

582-3511 



Smith. Wayne N., 105 Druien St., Campbellsville. 465-5268. 

Columbia. Ky. 384-2751 
Smith. W. Jack. 203 Ohio St., Somerset, 679-1211, Russell 

Springs, Ky. 866-4863 
Smith, Willard N., Box 23, Campbellsville, 465-5339, 465-4191 
Smith, William E., 4122 St. John'e Tr., Cincinnati 36, Ohio. 

791-3092, 731-2341 Ext. 266 
Smithson, Richard A., 1945 Nashville Rd.. Bowling Green, 

VI 3-4844 
Sosh, LaRue, Uniontown, 822-4213, 822-4444 
Sosh, Nelson, Uniontown, 822-4212, 822-4200 
Spencer. Irv., 10414 Sunlight Way. Valley Station. 937-7855. 

937-2300 
Spiceland, S. E.. 305 South 13th St., Murray, 753-2811 
Spoonamore, Jim, 111 Pettus Court, Stanford, 365-2348 
Spradlin, Robert, West Van Lear. 789-4166 
Staples. Charles L.. 1610 Lee Drive. Henderson, 827-3171, 

827-1846 
Steele, George. Box 605, Elkton, 265-4720, 265-2154 
Steenken. William R., 1636 Highland Pike, Covington, 331- 

3789, 431-3108 
Stephens. Herbert D., 133 let Street West, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry S., 1612 Hawthorn, Lexington, 299-1757, 

255-29S0 Ext. 284 
Stephenson, Thomas H., 3621 Brighton Cove. Paducah. 443- 

6102. 444-6525 
Stethen, James E.. Stone St., Box 134. Bedford. 255-3285. 265- 

4717 
Stevens, Alex, Golf View Terrace, Lebanon 
Stevens, James Lee, Hamby Ave., Dawson Springs, 797-2201 
Stevenson. Forrest. South Portsmouth, YE 2-4109 
Stewart. Herbert T.. 330 Maple, Hazard, 436-2438, 436-2438 
Stiff, Maurice E., 2150 Glenworth Ave., Louisville 18, 454-7808, 

585-2995 
Stikeleather. Clyde L.. 201 Goff Drive, Leitchfield. 269-3885, 

259-3387 
Stines. Ray A.. London. 864-5001, 864-2610 
Stinson. Charles L.. Maple St., Horse Cave. ST 6-2711. ST 

6-7131 
Stith, Houston, Route No. 2, Box 93, Elizabethtown, 765- 

4737, 765-6957 
Stoess, Henry L., Kavanaugh Road, Crestwood, CH 1-4196, 

JU 4-4658 
Stokes, Tommy G., Route No. 3, Madisonville. TA 1-6175 
Strain, Richard P.. Box 47 North Trailer Park, Fort Knox, 

4-8394, 4-4251 
Straub, Charles, Jr., 930 East 2nd Street, Maysville, 564-6096, 

564-3781 
Strong. Arnett, 116 Kentucky Blvd., Hazard, 436-3938, 436- 

2141 
Suffill, Bob, Drakesboro, GR 6-2939 
Sullivan, Don Chris, 3020 Dartmouth Drive, Lexington, 277- 

6953, Frankfort, Ky., 223-8221 Ext. 761 
Sutphin, William O., 2810 Central Ave., Ashland, 324-8028, 

324-2136 
Swanner, Doyle. Tennessee Ave., Pineville, 7-2254 
Switzer. Richard J., Jr., 1628 Banklick St.. Covington. 341-7447. 

581-1950 
Tackett, Don B., Box 145, South Shore. YE 2-4276 
Tackett. Harold. Box 58. Olive Hill. 326-5018. 326-7741 
Tarlton. Thomas O.. 5608 Ruutic Way, Louisville, WO 9-563T, 

EM 6-9561 
Tarvin, Roger Wayne, 13 Woodland, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-1232, 

CO 1-5404 
Taylor, Billy Joe, Route No. 1. Box 880, Pikeville, 7-4874 
Tegethoff. Kenneth E., Route No. 1, Geneva. VA 7-5891. VA 

7-5891 
Thoma. M. L.. 116 Holly. Berea, 986-4702 
Thomas, Frank M.. 520 South 10th St.. Louisville. 583-6354, 

584-9178 
Thompson. Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville. 452-9255 
Thompson. Jack F.. Jr.. 1310 Rammers Ave.. Louisville. ME 

4-3517 JU 4-5311 
Thompson. Kenneth E.. 619 Salisbury Road. Waverly. Ohio, 

947-5409, 493-6441 
Tinsley, Marion Francis, P. O. Box 447, Central City, 1721, 321 
Tirey, Lt. Col. James H., U.S.A.M.B., Fort Knox, 4-3562, 

4-8559 
Todd, Lonn-e H., Route No. 2, MadiBonville, TA 1-5028, TA 

1-6862 
Tompkins. Chester B., Slaughters, 884-3221. 884-3381 
Travis, Tom, 642 Price Ave., Madisonville. TA 1-1808 
Trivette, M Dale, Box 223, Virgic. 639-2265. 639-2774 
Tuck Lillard Ochell, 124 Lexington Dr.. Glasgow. 651-3331. 

651-3811 
Tucker. Neal R.. 121 Woolridge Rd., Hopkinsville, 885-5492, 

271-2020 
Tucker, Roscoe, Jr., G-5 Batewood, Danville, 236-4524, 236-2200 
Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, 441-5513, 

471-8120 
Vannerson. Duke, Route No. 2, Paducah, 444-9439 (Bus.) 
Vanover, J. W., Jackhorn, 855-4431 
Vanover. Walter S., 1101 Jefferson Ave., Evansville, Indiana 

HA 3-1974, HA 5-6211 
Van Sant, William E., 101 Holaday Lane, So. Ft. Mitchell, 

DI 1-6087 
VanZant, Jim, Box 602 Williamson, W. Va. 
Vaughan, Ronald G., Freebum, 456-3464, 456-3370 
Vermillion, Charles D.. 103 Bishop St., Corbin. 3136 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1963 



Does Your Present Student 
Policy Cover Your Athletes? 
We Can Solve Your Problem. 



^Ue Kin(fden Co4nfixi4u^ 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. 0. BOX 7116 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 252-8522 



Vescovi, Raymond B.. 3525 Laurel Ave., Evansville, Indiana. 

HA 3-8144. WO 3-3366 
Vettiner, Charles J.. Colonial Manor, P. O. Box 36, Jeffer- 

sontown. 267-7426 (Bus.) 
Vice, Charles G.. Route No. 1, Mt. Sterling, 1502J, Winchester. 

Ky. 744-3521 
Vinciguerra. Philip. Matewan. W. Va. 
Vipperman. Al. Ransom. 427-2810, EL 3-7362 
Visscher. Robert W., 5406-C Paquette St., Fort Knox, 4-5107. 

4-2947 
Wagner, Marvin Rudy. Route No. 1, Box 455, Pikeville, GE 

7-4611. 754-8184 
Waide, Harry D., 250 East Arch St., Madisonville, 821-1998. 

Walker, Paul R., 625 Meadowlawn, Bowling Green, 843-8893. 

843-8326 
Wallace. James E., 369 Fourth St.. Painteville, 789-4156. 789- 

3168 
Wallen. Howard W., Willianroport. 789-3066, 789-6050 

Bobbie E., 309 Strathmore Dr.. Lexington. 299-6123 

449 Cumberland Ave.. Pineville. ED 7-2654, 



Dr., Bowling Or 



3-3884, 



Walters, D 

9661 
Warren, Kenneth A.. 45 Meadowvii 

4-1551 Ext. 258 



Louisville, 614-5001, ME 



Warner, 
Way, J 
Weathei 
"Weaver, 
Weaver, 
Weiner, 



M. 



A.. Nancy 

imes, 211 W. Penn. Cynthiana, 234-2361, 234-3545 

s, Charles, Jr.. 3620 Grand, Louisville 11, 776-5026 
Clyde Ivan. Box 254. Williamson, W. Va. 
Ray. 55 Thompson Ave.. So. Fort Mitchell. 331-3761 

Richard A.. No. 8 Poplar Ridge. Alexandria. 697-5083. 

821-4280 Ext. 263 
Welch. John H. Mayking,. 633-2928, Jenkins. Ky. 024 
Wells. Jimmy. 106 Greenwood Dr.. Nicholasville, 885-4364. 

885-4191 
Welsh, Donald R., 6101 Watterson Trail, Fern Creek. CE 

9-8580, EM 6-9511 
Wermeister, Jack P., S24 Penn St.. Jeffersonville. Indiana, 

BU 3-6102. JU 3-8805 
Wesche. James A., 427 Queensway, Lexington. 252-4849, 266- 

7263 
West, Jim, New Residence Hall, Wajtem Ky. Stete College, 

Bowling Green 
Whalen, William C. Route No. 1. Maysville. 564-3942, 564-3461 
Wheeler, Donald Wayne, Route No. 2. Bowling Green. 842-7807, 

843-3031 
White, James, 401-C Smith Ave., Cumberland 
Whitehouse. Don, P. O. Box 451. Winchester. 744-4697. Lex- 
ington, Ky. 299-1221 Ext. 4153 



White, David B., 237 Longv 

843-4331 
White. J. L.. 1928 Gary Ave., Bowling Green, 2-0631, 3-9249 
Wickham, James R., Jr., 311 Cathedeal Manor, Bardstown, EL 

8-5282, TE 3-4612 
Wigginton, AI, Sr., 1137 Cecil Ave., Louisville, SP 6-7881 
Wiles, Eddie, Box 732, Owensboro, CO 4-5213 
Will, Chuck, 740 Plainview Acres, Madisonville, 821-2638, 821- 

3463 
Williams, Benny D., Route No. 3, Philpot, 729-4566, 683-1521 
Williams, Jack A.. 1539 MacAvthur Dr., Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-8876, HA 4-4201 
Williams, Roger, 404 Bond Street, Richmond, 623-3126 
Williams. Tom M., Jr., Box 288A, Bardstown, 348-3079 
Wilson, H. G., 205 N. Maple St., Somerset, 679-1290, 679-1544 
Winders, Floyd O.. Route No. 1, Hickory, 856-3511 
Winfrey, Shelby, 315 Sharon Drive, Campbellsville, 465-8392, 

465-8392 
Wingfield. Felix G., 1132 E. Parkway, Louisville 
Wirtz, Howard A., 6510 Hamilton Ave., Cincinnati. Ohio, 

622-1818, 751-1323 
Wise, Billy V., 2112 St. Teresa, Lexnigton 266-7449, 252-0410 
Wise. Jack, 408 Fountain Ave.. Georgetown. 2051, 120 
Withrow, Roy D., 310 Cleveland Ave., Glasgow, 651-3927 
Witherspoon, Tom, 908 Christopher Greenup, Owentiboro, 684- 

3949 
Wood, Ellsworth, Brooksville 
Wood, Kenneth C. 547 Robin Ave., Frankfort, 223-0244, 223- 

5870 
Woodard, J. William. 1308 Old Mill Rd., Lyndon, 425-1428, 

425-1428 
Woosley, Wil''am Travis, 1936 Madison, Paducah, 442-0274 
Wopriee, Ronald J., 10706 Milwaukee, Valley Station, 937-7998, 

584-4125 
Wray, Robert F., 29 Belle Monte, So. Ft, Mitchell, 331-2694. 

341-8293 
Wright. H. W., Jr.. 714 Cedar Grove Court. Louisville. SP 

4-5173, JU 7-1161 Ext. 433 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-0526. 381-1232 
Yanoff. Jay Myron. 3702 Stanton Blvd., Louisville. GL 8-7574 

(Bus. I 
Yarbrough. Curtis C, Route No. 2. Central City, 1534 
Yates, Howard C, Oil Springs. 297-3283, Ashland, Ky.. 325-6191 
YatOi. V'rgil, Route No. 1. Wingo, 376-2432- 665 
Yeary. Bill. Jr., 1435 South Limestone. Apt. 107, Lexington. 

255-4560. 252-3473 
Yelton, Gene B., Brooksville, 735-2328, 735-3591 
Young. Richard A,, 3400 South 29th St., Ashland, 324-3443 



Sutdif f e Has The 
Siv^eaters and Jackets 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Leftenng Service, W-Day Delivery 




SPECIAL SCHOOL PRICES ARE SHOWN 



V-NECK SLIP-OVER SV^EATERS 

No. 1030 — A Sand Knitting Mills sweater ot 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each $12.95 

No. 530-CL — Another Sand sweater in solid white. 
Choice of cheerleaders, bands, etc. Also very popular 
as athletic awards. White only; each $9.85 

No. 30V— 100% wool. Stock colors— Black, Old Gold, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange; each $10.50 



REVERSIBLE HONOR JACKETS 
Write us for our Catalog with Special School Prices 



BUTTON FRONT COAT STYLE SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100% pure wool yarn. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors — Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each $14.20 

No. 1520 — A companion sweater to the 58-W. Made 
by Sand in solid white coat style in medium weight. 
Sizes 34 to 46. White only. Colors are special order. 
This sweater is very popular with cheerleaders and 
bands. Each $12.95 

No. 2620J — A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — 100% pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, 
Purple; each $11. 30 



WE OPERATE OUR OWN LETTERING DEPARTMENT 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.45; B" letters $2.15; chenille bars, 50c each; 
chenille chevrons, 50c; name plates, 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and require three weeks for delivery. 



The SUTCUFFE CO 

INCORPORATED 

LOUISVILLE L KENTUCKY 



^ 



-tA 



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HUNT'S 
Award Jackets and Sweaters 

We have a quantity of award jackets and sweaters in stock and can make im- 
mediate shipment. Listed below are styles, colors, and sizes we can supply from 
stock, but if your color or style is not listed, send us your order and we will for- 
ward it to the factory for prompt delivery. 

SWEATERS IN STOCK 

No. CBC heavy weight worsted cotton back coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $8.95 
No. BSC 100i% heavy weight pure worsted, 3 ply, coat style sweater. 
Colors: White, royal, black and scarlet. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $12.45 
No. MiBC medium weight pure worsted, 2 ply coat sweater. This is a Kiddie 
style and is just the thing for your mascot, or child. 
Colors: Scarlet, royal and white 
Sizes: 6, 8, 10 and 12. 

School Price: $6.45 
No. MBRB V-neck, medium heavy weight worsted pull-over for cheerleaders. 
Colors: WTiite, black, kelly, Lt. gold, Old gold, royal, scarlet, 
Columbia Blue. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $8.45 
No. HIV heavy weight cheerleaders sweaters. ■' 

Colors: White, kelly, scarlet, black, light gold. 
Sizes: 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46. 

School Price: $11.95 









JACKETS IN STOCK 

No. TS9 jacket of 24 oz. wool with iridescent lining: contrasting color leather 

armhole inserts; leather pocket trim; knit trim. 

Colors: scarlet with white; royal with white. 

Sizes: Boys and Girls 30 thru 48. 

School Price: $15.00 
No. 302S jacket, 24 oz. wool reversed to satin; raglan sleeve style; iridescent 

lining; worsted mixed knit trim. 

Colors: Columbia Blue, grey, scarlet, and royal. 

Sizes: Boys and Girls 30 thru 48. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY CH 7-1942 

'WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY' 





K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Brisco Inman, R. 12: Jerry Kimmel, R.4: Chariie Irwin, R. 2: Goebel Ritter. 
R. 14; Georee Maines, R. 9: Turner Elrod, R. 5. Second Row: E. B. May, Jr., R. 15; Howard Gardner, R. 
6; Claude Ricketts, R. 7; Rex Alexander, R. 1; Ernie Chattin, R. 16; Charlie Vettiner, School Director. 
Third Row: Elmo Head, R. 8: Jack Wise, R. 10; Roy Settle, R. 3; Harry Stephenson, R. 11; Bill Nau, R. 13. 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

November, 1963 



How To Survive A Bad Year 

By John Lykins 

Editor's Note: Given below is a resume of one 
of the talks presented at the first annual basketball 
clinic of the K.H.S.C.A., held in Louisville on April 
18, 1963. 

I. ORGANIZE PRACTICE TIME. 

A. Make out practice schedules at the 
beginning of each week. 

B. Specify time practice is to end. En- 
courage boys to work so practice can end 
on time. 

C. Use clock to time drills. 

D. Keep practice schedules for refer- 
ence. 

li. KEEP TREMENDOUS STATISTICS 

A. Locate cause of bad year. Use valid 
test. Don't guess. 

B. Organize practice schedules accord- 
ing to weaknesses. 

III. FUNDAMENTALS YOU MUST 
WORK ON EVERY DAY 

A. Shooting: (1) lay-up, (2) jump shot 

B. Passing: (1) two hand, (2) one 
hand, (3) accuracy 

C. Tipping: (1) position, (2) leg spring 

D. Rebounding: (1) blocking out, (2) 
position offense (follow shot) 

E. Maneuvering: (1) with ball (various 
steps), (2) without ball (fakes-act), (3) 
pivots and turns (position) 

F. Defense: (1) individual work, (2) 
Freshmen and "B" team press all time 
(practice and game) — (a) increases endur- 
ance, (b) quickens reflexes, (c) enables bet- 
ter team defensive play in future years. 

IV. Encourage each boy to improve in 
his specific area of strength. This is no time 
to be a Jack-of-all-Trades. 

V. The practice schedule must double. 
Hard work is the only substitute for talent. 

VI. When no talent is available, a team 
must play aggressive, rough-and-tumble 
basketball and not allow their opponents to 
play. 

VII. Give an award to boy who does 
the following things the most: 

A. Hits the floor in an effort to recov- 
er a loose ball, 

B. Draws the most step-in-front fouls. 
VIII. General Hints 

A. Keep the play simple 

B. Work hard to control jump ball sit- 
uations 

C. Work on attitude (1) winning and 
losing (2) offensive and defensive 

D. Talk over game situations frequent- 
ly so your players will know what is going 
on at all times. 

E. Don't let practice get routine. It's 
the change-of-pace that creates enthusiasm. 

F. Most games are won or lost in prac- 
tice. 



G. Have squad members carry a basket- 
ball to class until they reach some goal that 
the coach has established for them. This is 
just another way to create interest in the 
game. 



Back Pain In Athletes 

Serious, disabling injuries of the back 
are unusual in sports among persons who 
have a sound spine to begin with. Con- 
tusions of the muscles, strains of the liga- 
ments and even fractures of various as- 
pects of the lumbar vertebrae ordinarily 
heal with no persistent disability in from 
two to six weeks. If disability persists be- 
yond six weeks, the physician will search 
for some underlying defect in the spine or 
its juncture with the sacrum. 

Congenital defects of the spine which do 
not produce obvious external signs are not 
ordinarily recognized during childhood. Dur- 
ing adolescence heavier stresses are placed 
on the spine by the greater size and weight 
and possibly more strenuous activities of 
the individual. When the boy or girl be- 
comes active in athletics, pain in the back 
or spasm of the back muscles may appear 
for the first time. Unless there has been a 
history of injury these difficulties are often 
discounted as "back strain" or "growing 
pains." Continuation of athletic activities, 
especially in the contact sports, may then 
result in an injury which becomes chronical- 
ly disabling because of the underlying de- 
fect. 

Coaches and trainers as well as team 
physicians should be wary of the athlete 
who seems to be having continual or recur- 
ring back pains, even if not disabling. Such 
an athlete may spend more time out of 
competition than in action, and will be a 
liability to the team as well as to himself. 
Serious injury to such an athlete often re- 
sults in long disability and heavy medical 
expense. Such cases have an unfavorable 
effect on the athletic insurance program as 
well as the individual concerned. 

The only way to prevent serious chron- 
ically disabling back conditions in young 
athletes is by rigidly excluding those who 
have serious congenital anomalies of the 
spines from sports which have a high risk 
of injury to the back. This can be done, 
first, by taking a careful history from all 
candidates for these sports. Any history of 
frequent back symptoms demands a care- 
ful evaluation, including x-rays before the 
candidate is admitted. On medical examina- 
tion any obvious or apparent spinal a'"nor- 
malities or muscle spasm should call for x- 
ray examination. Signifciant limitation of 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vii^L. XXVI— NO. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1963 



1.00 Per Year 



Points of Special Emphasis 

Sports are a vital, cultural expression of 
America. They are as expressive of the 
American way of life as are our freedom of 
speech, the right to vote, our schools and 
our choice of church. Participation is 
neither compulsory nor mandatory. Sports 
portray the true character of America and 
they are filled with vitality, with ideals and 
opportunities. The type of sports having 
the greatest impact on the public is in the 
field of athletics. Athletics are prominent 
in our school and college programs. They 
are conducted by the schools because they 
make a definite contribution to the funda- 
mental purposes of education and demo- 
cracy. Therefore, activities in the interscho- 
lastic program must be selected on the basis 
of their potential contribution to the pur- 
poses of education. Mere participation in the 
interscholastic sports program is no guaran- 
ty that educational outcomes will accrue. If 
the sport is to make its proper contribution 
to the education of the participant and 
spectator, it must be conducted on a high 
plane by leaders who clearly understand its 
goals and who seek intelligently to attain 
them. 

Traditionally football has played a prom- 
inent part in the interscholastic athletic 
program of schools because it provides 
unique experiences which contribute to the 
democratic way of life and to the develop- 
ment of desirable character and personality 
traits. Participation in and practice for in- 
terscholastic competition provides boys with 
the opportunity to learn how to cooperate 
and to sacrifice one's personal selfish inter- 
ests for the greater welfare of the group. 
Boys learn to cooperate as members of a 
team by actually doing so, not by reading 
or listening to lectures about it. 

Competitive experience also enhances 
the resnect for differences in people. Re- 
ST)€ct for differences in people. Respect for 
an individual because he is a human being, 
not because his father has money, or his 
family is listed in the social re'^ister, are 
lessons which can be and are being learned 
on the football field. Participation in the 
game establishes the principles of snorts- 
manshin, fortitude and fair plav, and. at 
the same time, puts a premium on stamina. 



Interscholastic athletics have been liken- 
ed to atomic energy in that they possess 
tremendous power either for good or evil, 
depending upon the way in which they are 
conducted. They may develop health or they 
weaken it. They may produce the good 
citizen or the thug. They may fulfill their 
true function as a great medium of educa- 
tion for youth, or they may be misused to 
glorify a coach, a school, a faculty, or to 
entertain the public. 

The oppotunities for a student to bene- 
fit from participation in interscholastic 
football has expanded greatly during the 
last decade and a half, and continue to do 
so. 13,758 schools now provide football ex- 
perience for 748,990 boys. 12,360 schools 
sponsor 11-man teams, 1,096 schools sup- 
port 8-man teams, 302 schools continue to 
include 6-man football in their program. 

The National Alliance Football Rules 
Committee has written a code of rules for 
the game which permits the competition 
to be conducted in an interesting and 
equitable manner and, at the same time, 
specifically prohibit unnecessary roughness, 
unfair tactics and unsportsmanlike conduct. 
If the potential of game experience is to be 
attained, it is necessary that those adminis- 
tering the game see to it that it is played 
in accordance with the letter and spirit of 
the rule. The action of the players must be 
in conformity to the rules and the officials 
must Bccept the responsibility for enforcing 
the rules promptly and with consistency. 

The responsibility for making certain 
that the game is played in conformance 
with the letter and the spirit of the rule 
is that of the coach and the officials. A 
co''ch must teach skills and strategy which 
are in accordance with the rules. When 
there are infractions, it is the responsibility 
of the officials to penalize pomptly and with 
consistency. Vigilant administration of the 
game rules permits no tolerance for infrac- 
tions, violations or fouls. The football player 
who intentionally violates a rule is guilty of 
unfair play and unsportsmanlike conduct, 
and, whether or not he escapes being penal- 
ized, he brings discredit to the good name 
of the game, which it is his duty as a play- 
er to uphold. 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



NOVEMBER, 1963 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 4 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hish School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington. 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64). Paintsville 

Direetors — Don Davis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsev 
(1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville: 
Preston Holland (1961-65); Murray; Don R. Raw'ings (1961-65), 
Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



Jtiom the Commissionci s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1963 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Federation basketball ex- 
aminatior. will be given all over Kentucky on Monday, 
Eecember 2, to officials who wish to work for the 
Approved and Certified ratings. Officials register- 
ed with the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year 
and who have not be?n regstered previously in any 
other state association, are not eligible to take the 
test. Those ir.terested should advise the State Office 
immediately in order that necessary arrangements 
can bi ma(ie with the school administrators who will 
supervise the taking of the exam. Officials living in 
Kentucky need not suggest the name of an examiner 
The Approved rating does not carry forward from 
year to year, but must be earned each year. After an 
official has received the Certified rating, he keeps 
this rating by attending clinics without havi.rg to con- 
tinue to take the exam each year. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 
If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Andrc'jki. Keith A.. 4123 Hillview Ave.. Louisville. 368-1461, 

WE 7-1312 ext. 32 
Ashworth, Fred G., 825 11th Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Blankenbaker, Kenneth, 1349 Mill Lane, New Albany, Indiana, 

WH 45-983. 636-2567 
Cecil. Don J.. Route No. 3. Vine Grove. 877-5217, 765-2271 
Coleman. Duke. 2554 Southview Drive, Lexington 
Dierolf, Maj. William H., Jr.. Signal Section. Ill Corps. Fort 

Hood. Texas, ME 4-3008, OV 5-7210 
Duff, Earl. 218 Lyttle Blvd.. Hazard. 6-2725. 6-3136 
Edwards, Donald. 7762-B Littlefield Loop, Fort Knox, 4-6049. 

4-7161 
Fucci. Dom. 752- Wellington. Lexington. 277-6327. 252-4"91 
Hall, Richard T,. 2960 Rio Rita, Louisville, 458-6611, 585-5135 
Jones. George W,. 6207 Pine Drive. Huntington, W. Va. 
Kennedy. James R.. 439 Huguelet, Lexington, 252-9222 
Lankert, Norman E.. 307 Sherwood Ave.. Clarksville. Ind. 

BU 2-33<!8 
Liber, Jim, 39 Glen Este. Cincinnati. Ohio. 281-3686 
Lynn, Robert E.. 211 Barbour, Providence 

Malcolm, Donald C, 1520 Ritter Blvd., Huntington, W, Va. 
Parker, Francis V.. Princeton St., Providence 
Simpson. Felix Delane, Hqs. Co., 4th MTB, 37th Armor, Ft. 

Knox, 4-2881, 4-3548 
Swantack. Stan. 7042 Paddison Road. Cincinnati 30, Ohio, 231- 

3235, 271-3453 
Swope. William W., 438 Price Road. Lexington. 255-2458 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky- 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on Saturday 
morning, September 28, 1963. The meeting 
was called to order by President Cecil A. 
Thornton at 11:00, vi'ith Board members 
Don Davis, Ralph C. Dorsey, Sherman Gish, 
Preston Holland, Don R. Rawlings, Foster 
J. Sanders and Oran C. Teater; and Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford was absent 
due to the illness of his father. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Ralph Dorsey, that the reading of the minu- 
tes of the July 27th meeting be waived, 
since the members of the Board had receiv- 
ed copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Assistant Commissioner gave a re- 
port on the progress of the football season 
in regard to the playoffs. Interest in the 
playoffs is on the increase. Only a very few 
of the schools do not have schedules to be 
eligible for a championship. Eleven schools 
are playing eleven-man football for the first 
time. Three schools discontinued the sport 
this season. 

President Cecil A. Thornton appointed 
the following men members of the State 
Wrestling Committee: Chairman Orville 
Williams, Louisville (Seneca) ; Will D. 
Evans, Louisville (Ky. School for the 
Blind) ; Bro. Leopold, C.F.X., Bardstown 
(St. Joseph Prep.). 

J. B. Mansfield, reported on two cases 
in which Commissioner Sanford had taken 
action recently. Hazard High School was 
suspended for a period of one week and 
three football games were forfeited for 
using an ineli.gible player, Charles Pankey, 
after he became twenty years of age. Wag- 
gener High School was placed on probation 
until December 1, 1963, and J. V. Coach 
Vernon O'Dell was relieved of his conching 
duties for a period of thirtv days for re- 
moving his football team from the field 
before the end of the Thomas Jefferson- 
Waggenev game played September 13. 1963. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by 
Oran C. Teater, that the Board go on record 
advocating that corresponding dates for 
football games be determined by taking 
dates from Thanksgiving Day back. This 
was to begin in 1965. The motion was carri- 
ed unanimously. 

Don Davis read a letter from Prin. Joe 
Anderson, Harrison County High School, 
concerning recent action taken bv the Board 
in re-districting the basketball teams in 
Region 10. The Board discussed the matter 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



Page Three 



PENNSYLVANIA CHAMPIONS 




Pictured above are the members of the 
1962-63 high school championship rifle team 
of the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic 
Association. Attention is called to the fact 
that ten of the thirteen squad members are 
girls. Are we overlooking something in the 
K.H.S.A.A.? 



at length and agreed to look into the district 
and regional set-up throughout the state 
a future meeting. 

President Cecil A. Thornton read a copy 
of a letter written to Commissioner San- 
ford from Prin. W. D. Bruce, Jr., Principal 
of Thomas Jefferson High School. The copy 
was presented by Foster J. Sanders. Foster 
J. Sanders moved, seconded by Ralph C. 
Dorsey, that the Board of Control recom- 
mend to the Commissioner, as a matter of 
new policy, the following interpretation of 
K. H. S. A. A. regulations: "Junior varsity 
teams competing against teams represent- 
ing two-year high schools shall not have 
these games count, for the junior varsity 
team's school, against the 'game limit men- 
tioned in K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 21." The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don 
Davis, that the next meeting of the Board 
of Control be held in Lexington on Decem- 
ber 21, 1963. The motion was carried un- 
anim.ously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Don 
R. Rawlings, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning July 20. 1963, and 
ending September 27, 1963, be allowed. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

In an executive session, the Budget 
Committee recommended that the salary of 
the Commissioner and Assistant Commis- 
sioner be increased bv five percent, retro- 
active to July 1, 1963; and that the trip 
mileage allowance for members of the 
Board of Control, the Commissioner, and the 
Assistant Commissioner be set at ten cents 



(10(') per mile. Upon motion made by Don 
R. Rawlings, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
the recommendations of the Budget Com- 
mittee were approved unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



Approved Officials 

Two additional officials have qualified 
for the Approved rating in football since the 
list of these higher rated officials appeared 
in the October issue of the ATHLETE. They 
are: James E. Kallaher and Stanley Washer. 



CORRECTIONS 

1963-64 BASKETBALL RULES 

PUBLICATIONS 

I. RULES BOOK: 

(A) Inside front cover: RULES DIF- 
FERENCES FROM LAST EDITION— 7-5: 
near end of first line following the word 
violation — add "or player control foul" . . . 

(B) Page 36: The words "player con- 
trol" should be inserted right after "follow- 
ing violation or a" in the middle of the sec- 
ond line of the paragraph headed DEAD 
BALL GOES THROUGH BASKET. 

II. CASE BOOK: 

(A) P.S. 6: Delete in fifth line of rul- 
ing "or when ball is dead because of a viola- 
tion and." Replace with "if". 

(B) P.S. 136B: Revise Ruling so it is 
as follows: "Yes for (a), (b), (c) and (d). 
In (e) A6 may not enter, however, if the 
clock is stopped for a charged time-out or 
some other reason, A6 should be beckoned. 
If A6 should be erroneously beckoned in (e), 
he may participate." 

(C) P.S. 136H: Add the phrase "fol- 
lowing a field goal" to item (b) of the Play 
so that it reads in the entirety: "before a 
throw-in following a field goal." Delete the 
last sentence of the ruling. 

(D) P.S. 232D: Revise the last sen- 
tence of the Ruling by deleting "at the spot 
nearest the violation" and reolacing it with 
"opposite nearer free throw line extended." 

(E) P.S. 250C: Delete from the sec- 
ond line of item (a) the following: "is not 
certain whistle is for a foul or for a viola- 
tion and." 

(F) P.S. 259A: Revise item (c) of 
Play to read, "(c) that A2 who is in the 
game changed his number without reporting 
the change." Insert the word "or" between 
(a), (b). Delete "or (c)." Add to last line 
"and two free throws for a flagrant foul 
are awarded." 

(G) P.S. 301C: Delete entire last sen- 
tence of Ruling beginning with "If clock . . ." 

(H) P.S. 360A: In (c) of the Ruling 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



delete "B's end line near B's basket" and 
replace with "at spot of throw-in." Add to 
the first sentence in (d) the following "and 
touches or is touched by another player." 

(I) P.S. 422A : Ruling — Change 
"legal" to "illegal." 

(J) P.S. 483P: Delete entire play. 
P.S. 22 on page 10 gives the correct ruling 
for the situation described. 

III. MEETING FOLDER: 

(A) Page 3, Topic Assignment 2: 
Delete in the middle of line 14 "it becomes 
dead" and replace with "there is a violation 
or foul." 

(B) Page S, Topic Assignment 3, Fun- 
damental 17: Reference in third line 
should be "defense" instead of "offense." 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1) 
If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adam.j. Charles D.. 5702 Indian Rock Road. Louisville 

Adams. William M., Letcher. 633-7787. 63.?-2524 

Adkins, James A.. Jr.. 7822A Snratz St., Ft. Knox, 4-3201. 

4-7(i28 
Albright, Julian H., 858 Greenwood Ave.. Clarksville. Tenn. 

645-5261. 645-2434 
Alexander, Claudis Levi, 6125 Morning Glory Lane, Pleasure 

Ridge Park, 937-7131 
Allen, Harry Gordon, Box 163, Prestonsburg. TR 4-2616, BU 

5-3011 
Andress, Guy, North High School. Evansville, GR 6-8981, HA 

5-7276 
Arflin, Tracy T., Terrell's Trailer Court. Lot 24, Oak Grove, 

439-4475, Ft. Campbell 4202 
Atkins, Earl R., Route No. 1, Cunningham, Tenn. 
Baird, William, Box 842, Hazard, 436-5443, 436-5443 
Ball, De.bert, Burgin, 748-5395, 748-6221 

Ballard, Jack H., 128 Pine St., Barbourville, 546-4482, 646-3210 
Ballard, Shirley, Snowfall Drive Winchester, 744-5344 
Basham, Millis, 416 Birkhead, Owensboro, MU 4-3993 
Baucom, Gene, 413 Sylvian Terrace, Hopkinsville, TU 6-7048 
Beckman, Arthur J.. 7761-A Littlefield Loop, Fort Knox, 

4-3408, 4-6337 
Berry Patrick H., 2968 Cheyenne Drive, Owensboro, 684-7070, 

683-9038 
Bitjig, Clifford A., 2419 Broadmeade, Louisville, GL 4-3797 
Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville, 297-3336, 265-2164 
Boehm, Robert Ted, 430 Kentucky Ave.. Lyndon Area, Louis- 
ville, 895-1154. 459-3610 
Bomersbach, Hoyte, Box 487, Mayfield, CH 7-6193, CH 7-2943 
Boyd, Jerry, 848 Crossbill Rd., Danville, 236-2247, 236-3637 
Boyd. Thomas, Wayland 

Bradford, Earl E., 218 Marrion Drive, Glasgow, 651-3835 
Bradshaw, Bill, Shake:-town Road, Burgin, 748-5266, 748-6180 
Breeden, Charles W.. Bard-jtown Road, Mt. Washington, 538- 

4897. 451-0600 
Brescia. Michael A., 913 Fairview Ave.. W. Portsmouth, Ohio, 

UL 8-5811 
Brockman, Gerald K., 2726 Riedling Drive, Louisville, TW 

3-2303, JU 2-3511 
Brown, Billy C. Route No. 1, Crab Orchard. 355-2017 
Brown. Thomas F.. 3598 Kenoak Lane, Cincinnati. Ohio, EL 

1-6532, 731-2323 
Browning, Earl, 8715 Blossom Lane, Louisville, 425-2937, 239- 

3267 
Brummett, Joseph W., 519 O'Hara Drive, P, O. Box 175. Dan- 
ville 236-2158 
Bruner. Jack C., Route No. 6, Box 29J, London, 864-4322, 

864-2701 
Bryan, William B., Route No. 4, Par«, 362-4228, 362-4264 
Burch, Michael, 108 5th St., Dayton, 431-256 
Burnett. Duke, Route No. 1, Cadiz. LA 2-6645, LA 2-8204 
Butler, Jack, 2604 4th Ave.. Huntington. W. Va. 
Butts, Delbert L.. 107 Sterling, Mt. Sterling, 1313, 864R 
Caldwell. James A.. 162 Clover Ridge. Ft. Thomas, 441-1626, 

397-2487 
Callahan, Tom J.. Brockman Hall. Xavier University. Cincin- 
nati. Ohio, ME 1-9604, 441-7102 
Campbell, James, Route No. 2. Elkton, 265-2055. 266-2363 
Campbell. John. Jr., Garrett, 358-3461 (Bus.) 
Canaday. Glenn, Vine Grove 
Canady, Ray B., 223 South Main, Barbourville, 646-3501, 646- 

3801 



Carpenter, Arthur D., Stanville, GR 8-4365 

Caple, Harold E., 318 Poplar, Ludlow. AX 1-6491 

Carroll. Joe E.. Falcon. 9-3194 (Bus.) 

Castell, Ralph M., East Bernstadt. VI 3-2732. VI 3-2730 

Cecil, Don J., Route No. 3, Vine Grove. 877-6217. 765-2271 

Clark. Larry W., 624 E. Mill Creek Road. Radcliff, 354-4574 

Clary, Kenneth 436 Cherry, Henderson, VA 7-3320 

Click, Edgle, Manton 

Cobb, Ken M., Maple 323. Hazard. 436-3272 

Cobb. Mike, Route No. 2, Central City.l427-J. Greenville 212 

Cole. Dickie. P. O. Box 265, Sweeden, 69-7-3606 

Coleman, Charles R., 509 E. Main St., Lexington. 2-6446 

Collins. Larry H., 3148 Beech Ave., Covington. AX 1-8616, ME 

1-0010 
Combs, Franklin D., Jackson, 666-5466, 666-2446 
Combs, William E., 520 Carol Drive, Greenwood, Indiana, TU 

1-4676, ME 0-1779 
Conley. Elzie, Jr., Route No. 2, Box 87, Salyersville. FI 9-4544, 

FI 9-4992 
Conway, James M., 260 Lookout, Frankfort, 7-4268, 7-2206 
Cornel;tjon, Walter Lee, Box 103, Bybee, 369-5631, 369-5350 
Cornette, Jack L.. Lovely, 395-5197 

Cox, Rufus A., 603 Hopewell, Madisonville, 821-2692, 383-3301 
Creamer, Tom, 317 River Side Drive, Russell, 836-3242, 836- 

3531 
Crocetti, Dom, 8002 Red Cedar Way, Louisville, 969-1895, 937- 

23 
Crutcher, Joseph Lamar, 116 Edelen St., Vine Grove, 877-2448, 

WI 27-47217 
Cunningham, Jack D.. Majestic 

Cunningham, Julian R.. Mt. Sterling, 1055J3, 1500 
Curiey, Tom, College Heights. P. O. Box 224. Bowling Green, 

VI 2-9074 
Curtis, Douglas E., 62 Willows Ave., Rantoul, 111. 892-2746, 

3-3111 ext. 5153 
Daugherty. Ernest R., Route No. 3, Box 287D. Anchorage, 

241-4166 
Davr.j, A. J. 811 Hall St.. Hazard. 436-4440, 436-3151 
Davis, Gene D.. Betsy Layne. GR 8-4931 

Dav:.j. Harod T., Box 191. Beaver Dam, 274-4166, 274-3870 
DeArmond, Jimmie W.. Route No. 1, Greenville, 450M4 
Decker, Bernard G., 1605 Miller, Murray, 763-6283 
Deim Martin D., Box 96, Route No. 4, Anchorage, 425-1766, 

896-0567 
Denham, Ronald, 212 Whitley Ave., Stanford, 365-7385, 365- 

2166 
Dierolf, William H., Jr.. Signal Section. Ill Corps, Fort Hood, 

Texas, ME 4-3008, OV 5-7210 
DiMuzio, Robert M., 5841 Brouse Ave.. Indianapolis, Ind., CL 

3-7686, CL 3-7686 
Dingus. Charles D., Hite 
Dixon. Charles Thomas, 331 McDonald Drive. Vemailles, 873- 

5064, 873-4989 
Doms, Albert R.. Jr., Hq. Co., 37th Armor. Ft. Knox, 4-3548, 

4-8136 
Duncil. Charles Slemp, 675-4686 
Eastridge, Bobby, 609 S., Columbia Ave., Campbellsville, 465- 

5014, 466-4157 
Edwards, Jimmv. Route No. 2, Leitchfield. 259-4372, 259-4372 
Eisaman, Gerald E.. USAARMC Special Services, Ft. Knox, 

942-2068, 4-1255 
Elliott, Carroll L., 307 College St.. Elizabethtown, 766-4007, 

765-6118 
Elliott, Humphrey, Liberty. 787-4291 

Ellis. Walter, Box 532. Brandenburg. 422-6201. 422-4665 
Emery. George A., 234 Clay. New Albany, Ind., WH 4-5267, 

Louisville 634-1511 
English, Herbert T.. Jr., Prospect, 228-4538 
English. Jerry. Route No. 4. Versailles. 3-4627. 3-4171 
Fallon. Robert J., 645 N. Main, Hazard, 436-4528, 436-2161 
Fannin, Benny Joe, Betsy Layne 
Farish, Merlin J.. Box 12, Irvington, 547-4455 
Farmer, Ralph L., 100 Liberty, Somerset, 679-1245 
Feher, A. J.. 500 Main St.. Lynch. 848-2717. 848-5431 
Fin'ey. Ron. 9120 Kenlock. Louisville. 425-2300. 582-2613 
Floyd. Richard Louis. Route No. 1. Bagdad. 747-8761 
Fly, Edward Lynn, 812 W. Main. Murray. 753-6754 
Francis. George, Anco. 436-3436 

Franzen. Leo N.. 36 Riley Road. Alexandria, 697-6634 
Frey, William R., 224 East 10th St.. Newport. 291-2268 
Fricke. Harold, 4761 Clevesdale Drive, Cincinnati 38, Ohio 261- 

1791 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Drive, Richmond, 623-4966, 

<; ''3-3424 
Frye, Gilbert Lee, Route No. 2, Fleminesburg, 845-8631, 845- 

2216 
Gabbard, John B., 320 North Hill St., London, 864-5915. 864- 

2863 
Galuk. Walter M.. 840 Bath Ave.. Ashland. 325-3305. 325-1751 
Galyen. Doug'as. Route No. 3. Greenville. 1279J 
Gay. David W.. 106 Maple Ave.. Lancaster 792-3322, 262-2250 

ext. 3407 
Geiser, Robert. 6532 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 231- 

8664, 231-5046 
Gentry, Bobby Gene, 2606 Canton Pike, Hopkinsville, 886-6219 
Gerding. Jim, 1007 Patteroon, Newport, 291-5152, 581-2410 
Goforth. Bob, Box 16, Loyall, 379, 2769 
Go'ns, Herman, 2nd Street, Williamsburg 
Goode, Earl, 1517 Versailles Road. Lexington, 265-2893, 277- 

6115 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



Page Five 



Grace, H. E., Jr., Middlesboro, 4, Pineville ED 7-3320 
Graham, Jim, 4506 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, 4-8169, 4-1155 

ext. 376 
Graves, Robert L., 1S28 Catalpa, Louisville, 776-7905, GL 4-4233 
Gray, Raymond, Box 87, Livermore, BR 8-2615 
Griffin, Charles David, 233 Garr, Flemingsburg, 845-2923, 

845-8011 
Griffin, Dennis. Route No. 2, Butler, 697-5998, 472-6901 
Gumm, Kenneth E., 7304 Edenderry, Louisville, 969-7335, GL 

4-7511 ext. 4559 
Hagedorn, Thomas, 156 Clover Ridge, Ft. Thomas, 441-3973 

562-7738 
Halcomb, Ralph, Main Street, Mt. Vernon, Livingston, 453-2641 
Hall, Billy Joe, 830 Sunset Drive, Lexington 
Hall, Jack R., Elkhorn City, SK 4-6981 (Bus.) 
Hall, Mac, Route No. 1, Box 187 Williamson, W. Va. 
Hall, William, Leeu College, Jackson, NO 6-9223 
Hamilton Steve, 308 W. Sun, Morehead 

Hardin, Carl Ray, Malan Acres. Lebanon, 692-2784. 692-3109 
Hardin, Donald Gene, Fifth Ave.. Morehead, ST 4-5668 
Harper, Robie, Beechmont, Drakesboro GR 6-2264 
Harrell, Bill D., 129 Alton Road, Shelbyville, ME 3-4601, ME 

3-2344 
Harris, Mickey, BIdg. 5339 Brett Drive, Apt. E. Ft. Knox 
Harrison, John L., Route No. 6, Cynthiana, 234-3333, 234-5721 
Harrod, Robert. 129 Camden, Versailles, 873-3227, 873-3691 
Haynes, William T., 1011 2nd St., Henderson, VA 7-3388, VA 

6-4255 
Hazelwood, Howard Perry, 213 Liverpool Road, Lexington, 

254-3385, 252-3930 
Heitzman, Don L., 3616 Lincoln, Covington, 431-1239, 431-0462 
Henderson, Robert L., Route No. 1, Water Valley, FL 5-2201, 

FL 5-2220 
Henley, Jimmy L., Box 122, Columbus, 677-2867 
Henson, Tony C, Route No. 6, Mayfield, CH 7-5742 I Bus. I 
Hicks Allan Don, Route No. 1, Boaz, 444-7858 
Hicks, Floyd E., 43 New URL Florence, 283-1207, 731-2121 

ext. 250 
Hisle, Charlie R., 37 Jackson St., Wincht'jter, 744-5754, Lex- 
ington 299-1221 ext. 4217 
Hogan, Cleo C Jr., Box 86, Park City, 749-2267 
Holt, Daniel D., Box 632, College Station. Murray, 672-3625 
Holt, Robert E., 600 Sanderson Drive, Hopkiwjville, 6-1738, 

6-1207 
Hopkins, Bobby L.. Box 109, Park City, 749-2642, 749-9000 
Horn, Dick, 8"2 Hillcrest, Danville, 236-3962, 236-6373 
Horton, John. Route No. 2, Owensboro, 683-5234 
Howard, Carl, Route No. 1, Lynnville, EV 2-2170, FA 8-3200 
Howard, Henry D.. Kentucky Ave., Pineville. 7-2744, 7-2996 
Hughes, Paul P., South Lake Drive, Prestonsburg, 886-6771, 

886-2170 
Hulett, Mack G., 102 Sue Barbara Court, Lancaster 
Hunter, Wayne, Route No. 1, Nicholasville 
Huston, Roderick J., 4940 Rose Terrace. Ft. Knox 
Huter, James J., 3643 Vermont, Louisville, SP 6-0707, Henry- 

viile. Indiana 796-6255 
Idol, Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Road, Middlesboro, 1315 
Ingraham, Gary J.. 1030 Greenleaf Road, Louisville, 673-2755, 

897-2815 
Ison, Ed, Skyline 

Jenkins, Jerry Springdale Ave., Cynthiana, 234-3350 
Johnson, Leroy, Lamb, 434-8296 

Johnson, Walter, Box 397, Grayson, 474-5908, 474-5721 
Jones, Joe S.. 203 Green St.. Manchester 598-3793, 598-3200 
Jordan, Art, 526 Dalton St.. Owensboro, MU 3-1024 
Kelly, Charles R.. 4535 Stone St., Louisville 16, 447-2665 
Kelly, Robert J.. Jr., 2321 Hilton Ave., Ashland, 325-1702. 

JE 2-2435 
Kidwell. James S., 1112 Parkway, Covington, JU 1-9141 
King, P. J. 307 Coast Guard. Owensboro. 3-2401 (Bus.) 
King, Raymond H., 216 Blossom Lane, Southgate, 441-5309, 

261-4357 
Kitchen, Leslie, 1701 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 256-6062, 299- 

4381 
Kloenne, Jack, 513 St. Joseph, Park Hills, 431-2475, 431-2986 
Kremer, Joueph A., 3727 Glenmeade Road, Louisville, 454- 

3991, 587-0026 
Lacy, William E., 124 Avalon Hills, Hopkinsville, TU 6-3660, 

TU 6-2515 
Ladd, Ronald E., 124 South Highland, Princeton. 365-6342, 365- 

5651 
Lally, James J., 1210 Ross Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, GA 1-6700 

ext. 653, 471-3644 
Lashbrook. Gene, 607 Warwick Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-0831 

MU 3-2431 
Laugherty, Kenneth R., Box 1198, Kincheloe Air Force Base 

Mich., 496-6611, ext. 2618 
Lawson, Leland, 949 Deporres, Lexington, 254-1009, 252-3044 
Lawson, Rondall, Blair Trailer Court No. 3, Morehead, 836- 

6486 
Lehkamp, Kenneth, 184 Valley View, Southgate, 441-1475, 697- 

8181 
Lequire, H. M., Horton Addition, Harlan, 1123-J, 2600 
Lester, Harold, Route No. 3, Harrodsburg, 734-3207 
Liles, Bill, 143 Holmes Drive, Paducah, 898-2030 
Littlepage, Pryce, 22 Midway Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-1642 
Logan, Donald E., Route No. 4, Falmouth, 664-3683, 654-3583 
Long, James E., Baukett, VA 7-3"62 
Longo, Richard, 143 Castle Heights, Harrodsburg, 734-2727, 

734-3242 



Louden. Hubert C Route No. 3, Box 288, Anchorage, 241-4154, 

587-8411 
Lovely, Hamlet, Box 92. Garrett, 368-4076 
Lynn, Robert E., 211 Barbour, Providence 
Lytle. William Price, Box 758, Lagrange, Georgia, TU 2-3824, 

Columbus. Georgia MU 9-5180 
McBride, W. Kenneth, 157 St. William Drive, Lexington, 266- 

7786, 265-6666 Station No. 1 
McCauley, John E., 208 Paddock Road, Clarksville, Tenn. 645- 

6295, 647-1601 
McClure, William Scott, 404 College. London, 864-5669, 864- 

2255 
McDannold. Lewis H., 150 Kilmer Drive, Versailles, 873-5349, 

873-3571 
McDonald. Charles W., 1415 Indianola St., Bowling Green 
McFall, Gene G., 107 Turner Ave., Lancaster, 792-3124, 648- 

McGuire. Herbert W., 914 Rosemont Ave., Danville, 236-0546, 

236-6221 
McLane, Albert I.. General Delivery, White Mills, 862-4579, 

862-1924 
McLeon, Robert N., Box 620, Somerset, 678-5669, 678-8766 
Maines, (Jeorge E., 3418 Terrace Drive, Erlanger. 341-7460, 

421-4454 
Mallory. Bradford, 7409 Dixie Highway. Florence, 283-2714, 

431-0900 
Mancuso, John Paul, 1303 Olive Blvd., Box 726, Murray, 753-1349 
Maner. Richard A., 314 Harahan, Paducah, 443-5448, 442-2426 
Marlette, Ronald L.. 133 Lyons Drive, Frankfort, 227-6784 
Marshall. T. N., 1320 Central Ave., Apt. No. 3, Ashland, 324- 

1991. 324-0073 
Martin, Robert Eugene, 429 Chestnut, Henderson, VA 6-3833, 

JE 3-6473 
Mattingly, Bernard, Hardin-jburg, 6-6175, 6-5175 
Maxwell. James E., Box 265, Warsaw, 667-6751, 657-6751 
Maynard, Lonnie, Freeburn, 

Meadors, Bill, 102 Millers Lane Ft. Thomas, 781-2348 
Meadows. Marvin, Clayhole 
Means, Hugh W., 2704 Florence, Hopkinsville, TU 5-5993, TU 

6-5993 
Metzger, Donald R., 3317 Utah Ave., Apt. No. 1, Louisville 

366-8543, GL 4-7611 Ext. 624 
Milbern, Daniel L., McKinnev, 346-3751, Lexington 252-2250 

ext. 26"3 
Miller. Bob, 197 Holiday Lane, Ft. Thomas, 441-6885, 697-6868 
Miller, Ferrel, Route No. 1, Murray, 435-4151, 435-4151 
Miller, Kenneth H., 5406 Paquette St., Van Voohris, Ft. Knox 
Miller. Leemon O., Jr., 2309 Kentucky Ave., Paducah. 442-0014, 

444-6311 
Miller, Rex J., 2711 Greenway Road, Ashland. 324-5023 
Miller, Roy J., 544 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Indiana, BU 3-6335, 

366-4218 
Miller, Victor, 23 Pine Hill Drive, Hiland Heights, 781-0619, 

431-3778 
Mink. Robert Jerry. Main Street, Livingston 
Montgomery, Chttjter, 1310 South Elm, Henderson, VA 7-3075, 

VA 7-3075 
Montgomery. Don, First Street. Bm-gin„ 748-5582, 748-5180 
Mooneyhan, James H., 810 Henry St., Franklin 
Moore, Josiah L., 621 Northside Drive, Lexington, 299-1006. 

254-0960 
Moore. Roy, Jr., P. O. Box 28, London, 864-6023, 864-2246 
Morris, Charles E., Route No. 1, Box 17, Lily, 864-4379 
Mudd. Ed. 3512 Mildred Drive, Louisville, SP 6-6888 
Murdock, Pat, Route No. 2, Kirksey, 489-2881 
Musselman Thomas, P. O. Box 5654 Cherokee Station, Louisville, 

GL 4-4688, GL 4-4588 
Napier. Harold G.. Hardburly 

Napier, Walter, Jr., Box 199, Loyall, 1806W, 753 
Neal, James, Faii-view Drive, Route No. 2, Owensboro, MU 

4-3-94. MU 3-2401 ext. 512 
Neikirk, D. Paul, Ruth, 679-2103, 678-8216 
Nelson. Bernard L., 103 Perry St., Louisa 
Nevil, Vernon E.. 7748-C 70th Tank Bn. Rd., Ft. Knox, 4-6604, 

4-8630 
Newsom, Lawrence, 538 Parkside Drive, Lexington, 299-6367, 

252-4590 
Niceley, James E., Route No 2, Utica, PA 9-4634 
Nie, Allen F., 1031 Isabella, Newport, 291-6847, 261-1726 
Noble, Charles B., 1164 Main St., Jackson, 666-2728, 666-9224 
Noble, Leonard, 439 Court, Jackson, 666-2430, 666-2887 
Norwood, Donald V., Strawberry Lane, Route No. 6. Franklin, 

586-5119, 586-4636 
Norwood, Thomas Richard, 811 Henry St., Franklin 
Nunn, Wesley L.. Star Route, Brandenburg, 422-6736, 422-4560 
Ogle, Pat, Hawesville, WA 7-2281 
Osborne, Virgil F., Jonancy, 639-2740 

Overmyer, Ethan A., 300 South 16th St.. Murray. 753-5695 
Overton, Frank, Jr.. Box 36, Four Mile. ED 7-2026 
Owen, Harry Edward, 232 Lowry Lane, Lexington, 277-9019 
Page, Richard H., 1015 Paris Road, Mayfield. 247-3891, 247- 

2615 
Parker. Francis V., Princeton St., Providence 
Parrish, Dale C, Route No. 1, Box 215, Frankfort, CA 3-1257, 

CA 7-2231 ext. 534 
Partridge, William, 410 South 6th St., Rockport, Indiana, 

MI 9-4167 
Patterson, Jimmy, 903 Hustonville Road, Danville. 236-3909, 236- 

4727 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 




Ernie Chattin c.iarcoais uie test steak 
in Kentucky, and Helen, his wife, bakes 
the best apple pie. Ask Rex Alexander what 
Alex Groza did to Helen Chattin's garlic 
bread when they tried out one of Ernie's 
steaks. The clinic trip just completed was 
a gourmet's delight. 

Somerset's Bill Clark, Jim Williams and 
Doug Hines ; Hopkinsville's Bernard John- 
son ; E'Town's Howard Gardner ; Beech- 
mont's Jerry Kimmel ; Bowling Green's Bon- 
nie Schmied ; Hazard's Reverend John Na- 
gele and Paul Townes ; and Morehead's Bob- 
by Laughlin get the Dutchman's nod for 
Kentucky's largest athletic appetites. If 
all of these Kentuckians dropped in on 
Ernie and Helen, even those two couldn't 
charcoal and bake fast enough. 

"Corky" Withrow, who will replace Stan 
"The Man" Musial on the St. Louis Baseball 
Team, had dinner with the Dutchman at 
Beaver Dam. The Central City "fence bust- 
er" attended the clinic so he could qualify 
for basketball officiating this winter. 
"Corky" has confidence, ability and deter- 
mination. St. Louis fans will like him. 

Picked up a couple of country hams at 
Murray for two grand Hoosiers, Phil Eskew 
and Herman Keller. Nothing like a Ken- 
tucky ham to properly nourish Phil and 
Herman! 

When George Maines and Stanley Amzen 
opened the doors for the Newport Clinic, 
Tom Ellis, Ed McNabb and Bob Miller led 
a crowd of more than two hundred into the 
gym. Stanley is looking for a larger space 
for 1964. Louisville had the largest crowd 
of four hundred which was a tribute to 
Claude Ricketts' promotional ability. 

This doesn't happen often. John Dotson 
of Vincennes, Indiana, wrote the following 



after receiving a Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
Award : "Thanks for the Corn Cob Pipe 
Award, but I don't understand the the three- 
legged horse." Every horse has "gotta" 
have four legs. If your horse doesn't, he 
had one broken off or else he isn't a Ken- 
tucky thoroughbred. 

Two Cob Pipes for unselfish service go 
to Cleophus Pursifull, 808 Dorchester Ave- 
nue, Middlesboro, and Albert McLane of 
Stephensburg. Cleophus is to the mountains 
of Eastern Kentucky what Irvin S. Cobb 
was to the Purchase. Cleophus is a combina- 
tion of fun and service. Albert McLane of 
West Hardin High School should have been 
honored years ago for his unselfish service 
for young people. His record as a coach is 
spotless and now that he is retiring he will 
be missed. You are one of "Nature's Noble- 
men", Albert. 

The Dutchman has a brand new plaque 
on his office wall. At Indianapolis Don 
McBride, Muncie, presented it on behalf of 
the Eastern Indiana Officials' Association 
for outstanding contribution to basketball 
officiating in the Hoosier state. Jack Small 
of Lafavette followed up this presentation 
with an engraved cigar lighter. Our cup 
runneth over. 

Jerry Gilbert, South Central Officials' 
Association located at Elizabethtown writes, 
"Howard Gardner deserves a Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor for his impartial handling 
of Sixth Region officials and for his dedi- 
cation to the instruction of young officials". 
Howard is one of the greatest in the Dutch- 
man's book. The award is on its way. 
THINGS I LEARNED FROM 
SEVENTEEN CLINICS 

1. There is this advantage to the offic- 
ial raising his hand when his whistle sounds 
on violations : If there is pandemonium in 
the gymnasium and the whistle is not heard 
by the timer, the official's raised hand could 
be seen and the clock could be stopped. 

2. Play Situation 451 S (a) and Rule 
2-9 state that the official must hand the ball 
for throw-ins unless the throw-in is from 
outside and end line following a score. Be- 
cause basket interference is a violation, 
the official is to hand the ball for this 
throw-in even though points are scored. 
The Dutchman ruled incorrectly on this 
in the clinics. After more than forty (cor- 
rection, fifty) years on this planet, it has 
finally happened — I made a mistake. Don't 
ever let this happen to you. 

Play Situation 15 in your Case Book is 
correct. 

3. Al runs and passes off to A2 who 
throws the ball in the basket. Al traveled 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



Page Seven 



near the division line. Ruling: Ball is award- 
ed to B out of bounds nearest the spot of 
the violation. 

Bulletin to Ohio officials — The Dutch- 
man will see you at the Green Meadows Inn 
in Columbus on November 17th. 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of 
the University of Kentucky Colleee of Education. 
The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a" refer to elementary, junior 
high, senior high, college and adult audiences who 
may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Basketball 
ASHLAND VS. ST. XAVIER (1962 K.H.S. BASKET- 
BALL TOURNAMENT FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 3 

reels, Silent, $.75 

The Ashland Tomcats gave a valiant performance 
in trying to capture their second consecutive cham- 
pionship but the Tigers of St. Xavier were the win- 
ners in the final game by 62-58. The Tigers were led 
by Mike Silliman and the Tomcats by Larry Conley. 
BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 

$1.50 

Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment, before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 
BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photogra- 
phy, and action shots are combined in this new film 
prepared under the persoral direction of Mr. Rupp 
especially for coaching use. Among the drills and 
plays covered in this film are: jivot man's slide into 
the basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky Basket 
Maker; legal screening; penetrating zone defense; 
and the Kentucky fast break. 
BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Of- 
ficial Sports Film Service under the sanction of the 
National Federation. A fantastic dream sequence 
where impossible and nightmarish situations can and 
do arise is the continuity thread used throughout the 
film to depict: Accepted officiating procedures — prob- 
lems created by double fouls and false double fouls — 
tricky situations connected with front and back court 
— jump ball infractions and procedures — little under- 
stood distinction between player and team control — 
and a panorama of basic rule fundamentals. 
BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 

TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, IV2 reels, $2.50 

Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, used his team to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of basketball. Slow motion photography is' used to 
break the various court techniques down into easily 
grasped essentials. 
BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 

$2.50 (in state). $5.00 (out of state) 

This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 
BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 

reel, $1.50 

The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 



and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 

film. 

BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 

1 reel, $1.50 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stop- 
ping, turning) passing (finger control, movement 
with the pass, leading the receiver, choice of the right 
pass), catching (side pass, high pass), shooting (fing- 
er control, arm extension., ,wrist flip, choice of the 
right shot), dribbling, making, and pivoting are dem- 
onstrated and explained in this film. 
BASKETBALL FOR GIRLS: FUNDAMENTAL 

TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 man.), $1.50 

Fast action, slow-motion photography, and skill- 
ful players combine to show fundamental techniques 
of ball handling, passing and shooting. 
BASKETBALL FOR GIRLS: GAME PLAY, j-s-c-a, 

1 reel (11 min.), $1.50 

Individual player techniques in offense and de- 
fense are demonstrated-pivoting, feinting, passing, 
screening, shooting and handling rebounds. 
BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Sei-vice under the sanction of the National Federation 
of State High School Athletic Associations. It dem- 
onstrates current rules and good officiating procedure 
with colorful action by skilled players. 
CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL — TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 

Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 
DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 

1 reel, $1.50 

Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuver- 
ing him out of position and other basic skills are 
illustrated, using special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm 
action are taught also. 
DUNBAR VS. AHLAND (1961) Finals, e-j-s-c-a, 

3 reels (33 min.), color, ,silent, $.75 

The Tomcats from Ashland High School won the 
final game of the tournament by defeating Dunbar 
High School of Lexington 69-50. The Ashland team 
won the tournament after elimintaing William Grant, 
Seneca and Wheelwright to reach the final game. 
MONTICELLO VS. FLAGET (1960 K. H. S. A. A. 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, silent, $.75 

Flaget High School of Louisville defeated Monti- 
cello High School in the final game of the tournament 
to win the championship. The Braves came from be- 
hind in the last half to overtake the Trojans and win 
by a score of 65-56. 
NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL (1959) 

K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, 

e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

The Indians of North Marshall High School prov- 
ed too much for the Reds of duPont Manual in the 
fnial game, vdnning by a score of 64-63. All-State 
players, Doyle and Lampley, were best for the win- 
ners, w'hile Melear and Siers led the Reds. 
OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (40 min.), 

color, $.75 

Demonstrates the official rules interpretations 
covering screening, traveling, jump ball,, front and 
back court, throw-ins, free throws, personal and 
technical fouls, rebounding, and unusual and often 
misunderstood play situations. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, j-s- 
c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 

Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such a 
clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn each 
play. 



Page Eig'ht 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



RUPPS PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMP- 
IONSHIP OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $3.50 
This film presents the high lights of all the games, 
both regular season and tournament games, which led 
up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the NCAA 
basketball crown. 

SENECA VS. LEXINGTON DUNBAR, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, 
silent, color, $.75 

The Se.-.reca Indians defeated the Lexington Dun- 
bar Bearcats by the score of 72-66 to win the forty- 
sixth annual state championship. Redd and Unseld 
led Seneca while Wilson and Smith were best for 
Dunbar. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Co.'.centrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total body 
coordination, especially ir«ward rotation of the hand 
and arm making the throw. 

ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO. (1958) K. H. S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s- 
c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, i.-i the final game of the 
tournament at the University of Kentucky Coliseum. 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Five) 

Payne. Gayle H. Bethlehem, 878-5981, 878-5980 

Peden, Harlan C, 1708 Mosley Drive, Hopkinsville, 269-2102 

(Bus.) 
Pelfrey. Charles E.. 2004 Dalton St., Ashland, ,324-1240 
Penix. Robert Ferrell, Williamsport, 789-3412, 789-3048 
Pennell, Donald G., Route No. 2, Box 28, Jenkinu, llO-R 
Penrod. Joe B., 1203 Locust, Owensboro, MU 3-8773, MU 4-1175 
Perry. George B., Route No. 2, Princeton, EM 6-2633, EM 5-5615 
Phelps, Mervil E., Route No. 1, Owensboro, MU 3-0997, MU 3- 

3575 
Phelps, Ralph, 620 Bellefonte Road, Flatwoods, 836-3670, 324- 

1155 ext. 258 
Phillips, Ray, Campion, 8-3473 
Pietrowski, Paul, 108 Bishop, Corbin. 957R 
Pike, Robert F., 2';7 5th St., Carrollton, 732-4309, 732-4289 
Piper, James A., 154 St. Philip, Lexington, 266-4449, 277-9991 
Pittman, Spencer, 205 Clements Ave., Somerset, 679-1389, 679- 

1307 
Poffenbarger, George, 220 Sycamore Road, Lexington, 266-4106, 

252-9965 
Polly. Rex, 334 Hazard St., Whitesburg, 633-2597 
Poynter, James L., 57 Bon Haven, Winchttiter, 744-6932, 744- 

4618 
Prather, Wilbur E., 1512 Berry Blvd. Louisville, EM .3-2908 
Prewitt, Allan, 209 S. Campbell, Lancaster, 792-2024, 548-2631 
Prior, Lowell F., 1722 Highland Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio. EL 

3-0700, EL 3-6129 
Pruden, Jim, 3739 Kipling Dr., Owensboro, MU 4-4469, MU 

3-4551 
Pyle, Ronnie F., 312 North 2nd Street, Central City, 1153, 

Greenville, Ky. 1155 
Rakel, Bob, 2625 Topeka St., Cincinnati 31, Ohio, 825-8135, 

761-0838 
Randolph. Don M., 6310 Shelia Road, Louisville, 969-6359, 969- 

5145 
Randolph, John, Box 341, Cadiz, 522-8817, 522-6653 
Ratchford. Charles R., Jr., 516 North 33rd St., Louisville, SP 

2-0108, JU 4-6329 
Rawlings, Charles, Route No. 3, Elizabethtown, 765-2529, 765- 

5237 
Replogle. R. Kent, 1912 Cambridge Dr., Lexington. 255-2360, 

252-2201 ext. 2264 
Reschar John V.. Sr., 5518 Pico Lane, Louisville. 969-3885. WE 

7-2300 
Rexroat, Jerry, 204 W. Main, Lebanon Junction, 833-4446, 

Louisville 447-3221 
Richardson, Ralph D., Route No. 1. Fonthill 
Richardson, Charles E., Waco 
Rickard, Bob, Box 91, Bremen, 3411, 3554 
Riggs, Floyd L., Route No. 8, Box 400, Evansville, Indiana, 

UN 7-3090, HA .5-3346 
Rightmyer, W. H.. Jr., Itouto No. 3, Owensboro, MU 4-5866 
Rison, Johnny B., 197 3rd St., Ravenna, 723-2852 
Roberts. Ray M., Route No. 6, Murray, 753-5583, 753-1651 
Robertson, Joe B. 2719 Cayce Meade Dr., Hopkinssville, TU 5-8283 
Roby, Joseph L., P. O. Box 1504, Owensboro, 275-4440, 683-7365 
Rogers; Robert L., Route No. 7, Hopkinsville, 886-7139 
Rose, Scotty, Box 125. Hazel Green, MO 2-2615 
Rothfuss, Richard, 37 Gregory Lane, Ft. Thomas. 441-9190, 431- 

6990 



Roy, Charles D., 410 Lexington, Evansville, Indiana, HA 2-5429 
Royje, Pete, 220 Richmond Ave., Nicholasville, 885-4975, 252- 

2200 ext. 2141 
Rudolph, Charles R., 646-A Jameswood, Paducah, 443-1009, 444- 

6311 
Rush, Rex E., 604 Columbia. Tompkinsville, 487-5964 
St. Clair, Robert L., Jr., 5703 Norton Ave., Louisville, 969-1023, 

EM 6-0326 ext. 4 
Salyer, Henry E., 4829 Bluebird Ave., Louisville, 969-6371, SP 

8-2731 ext. 410 
Sams, Glenn, Pond Street, Auburn, LI 2-6712 
Sanders, Joe T., 1402 Hillcrest, Futon, 1130, 2080 
Sanford, Duncan E., Co. B. Rec. Sta., (BOQ 1393), Ft, Knox, 

4-5936, 4-3035 
Schmidt, Frank L., 1232 Fischer Ave., Louisville, ME 7-2717 
Schmitt, Paul E. 2321 W. Market, Louisville, 778-5355, 635-5251 
Scale, John Daniel, Box 34, Bonneville, 593-2692, 693-2815 
Secrest, Eldon W., 212 Robin Road. Russell, 836-6322 
Selvy, Curt, Route No. 2, Box 26A, Corbin, 2422, 1333 
Sharp, Lloyd, Box 165, Slaughters, 884-3329, 639-2861 
Shartzer, E. Philip, 3906 Jewell Ave., Louisville, SP 2-0021, 

636-3351 
Shelton, Benny R., 300 Parker, Mayfield, CH 7-6664, CH 7-3061 
Shewcraft, Clifford W., Route No. 2, Calvert City, 395-5421 
Shewmaker, Treffert, 100 Linden Court, Wilmore, 858-5871, 

255-3181 
Shore, David W., Box 441, Cadiz, 522-8760, 522-8121 
Silliman, William Gerald, 3302 Radiance Road, Louisville, 451- 

9512 
Simpjon, Felix Delane, Hqs. Co. 4th MTB, 37th Armor, Ft. 

Knox, 4-2881, 4-3548 
Simpson. Paul, 110 Poplar St., Box 56, Jellico, Tenn. 424-6533, 

424-6567 
Singleton, Ronnie Herman, Box 1667, Berea, 986-9953 
Slone, Douglas, Route No. 2. Stamping Ground, 832-4472, 160 
Small, William W., 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., Louisville 16, 

EM 8-8365, JU 4-6308 
Smith, David W., 8107 Rory Way, Louisville, 969-0060, 585-3249 
Sollman, Frank H., 417 Eline Ave., Box 7, Louisville, 895-6946, 

SP 8-6664 
Solomon, Jim. 931 Pine, Benton. 527-8760, 527-2781 
Sparks, Keith E., Jr., 9816 Gandy Road, Valley Station, WE 

7-6856, 366-9611 
Sparrow, Jim, 313 Greenvievv, Lawrenceburg, 9-4157, 9-4584 
Spaulding, Stan, 500 Fourth St., Waverly, Ohio, 947-4912, 947- 

2484 
Speck, Michael E., Route No. 2, Cecilia. 862-4608, 862-1924 
Staples, James E., 202 Taylor, Glasgow, 651-8190, 651-5196 
Stauffer, Frank, Tyrone Road, Lawrenceburg, 839-6350 
Stephens, Kenneth H., Stearns, 376-5373, 376-2165 
Stewart, Ted, Box 62, La Center 

Stokes, Bob, 7810 3rd St. Road, Louisville 14, 368-0296, 937-2300 
Swarts, Joseph C, 135 Lane St., Ironton, Ohio 
Swim, Gerald D., Box 323, Evarts, 837-2836, 1354 
Swope, William W., 438 Price Rd., Lexington, 265-2458 
Tackett, Layne. Box 51. Morehead, ST 4-4149 
Taylor, Alton,. Route No. 1. Box 269 A, London 
Taylor, Ed, 435 North 41st St,, Louisville, 772-0126, 459-3400 
Theiss, Charlcj H.. Buckner, 279-5291, 279-6291 
Thomas, Charles, 410 E. Drive, Fulton, 1948, 665 
Thomason, Bennett, Box 92, Bardwell, 628-3150 
Thompson, Houston, 513 East 20th St., Covington, 581-8594, 

261-4426 
Thompson, Tommy. 1113 Cleveland Ave., Park Hills, Covington, 

431-6961. 331-1651 
Todd,, W. O., Jr., 116 Wojt St., Somerset, 678-8021 (Bus.) 
Tolley, Harold B., North 18th Ext., Murray, 753-5631 
Toy. Donny J,, Main St., Sharpsburg, 247-3211, 674-3191 
Triplett, Herbert W., 124 Harrison, Mt. Sterling 
Turner, Aaron, Park City, 749-2666 (Bus.) 
Turner, Bruce. 1456 High St., Paris, 987-2713, 987-9050 
Turner, Jimmy, Drift, FR 7-2982 

Turner, Tommy, Route No. 3, Versailles, 873-4661 (Bus.) 
Tyre, Donald C, 225 Rolling Acre Dr., Frankfort, 223-3668, 254- 

6610 ext. 35 
Vance, Hunter, Jr., 1311 Smallhou'je Road, Bowling Green, 

2-3631 (Bus.) 
VanHoose, Edgar N., Box 871, Paintsville, 789-4182, 789-4212 
Van Meter, Kaye Don, Brownsville, LY 7-3960 (Bus. I 
Varble, William E., 1705 Cypress, Louisville, 775-6712, 772-3621 
Vaughn, Melvin, P. O. Box 265, London, 864-2229 (Bus.) 
Veneklase, Kenneth, 3223 Utah, Apt. No. 4, Louisville, 366-0208, 

SP 8-2731 ext. 410 
Vinson, Ray T., Trailer Court, Campbellsville, 465-8625 
Walker, William J., No. 18 Orchard Heights, Murray 
Walsh, Herschel N.. Louisa High School, Louisa, 638-4479, 638- 

4574 
Walton. Roy, 106 Vanderbilt, Lexington, 277-2241 
Ward, Jack. 722 Belmar Drive, Owensboro, 683-4147, 684-8853 
Ware, Robert Dean, East State Line, Fulton, 2235, 665 
Watkins, Paul D., 1706 Navajo Drive, Owenyboro, 683-8725, 

683-3575 
Watts, Franklin, Blackey, 633-2648 (Bus.) 
Wearren. Wade H., 4112 Stoncvicw, Louisville, 895-8969, GL 

8-3103 
Webb, David L., Bee Springs, 597-3673 
Weyer, James, 42 Scenic View Drive, Fort Thomas, CO 1-6400 



White, W, Carl, Box 16X, Route No. 3, Central City. 1814 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



Page Nine 



Wiler 
Wiilii 
Willi! 

Willi: 
Willis 

Willis 



Whitehead, J. R., Jr., 226 W. Depot Street, Greenville, 1225J, 

212 
Whitt, John, 158 Robin Road, Russell, 836-3575 

Whittemore, Paul F., Qtrs. 360, USMA, West Point New York, 
N. Y., 3360, 3859 
James W., Blaine, 652-3546 

ms, Donald, 301 Elm Street, Ravenna, 723-4341, 723-2515 
my, Jim, Elmwood Drive, South Shore. YE 2-4372, YE 

2-3056 
ms, Paul Winston, Hagerhill, 789-4503 
Robert A., 234 South 25th St., Louisville, 778-6526, 587- 
8854 ext. 33 
Robert Kenneth, 1163 Center, Bowling Green 
Winchester, Roy L., Bethlehem, 878-4102, New Castle, Ky. 346- 

8421 
Wirtz, Leonard F., 8732 Balboa Dr., Mt. Healthy, Ohio, 931- 

1468, 531-0711 
Wolfe, Paul A., 502 Broad, Falmouth, 654-5341, HI 1-9993 
Wood, Randall James, 712 Maple Ave., Falmouth 654-4461 
Woods, Gene, Route No. 2, Kirksey, 489-2595, Calvert City EX 

5-4181 
Woodward, Billy, 2430 Lewis St., Owensboro, MU 3-9710, MU 

4-7017 
Woolery, Bob, Box 624, Russell, 836-8410 
Wright, Billy J., Box 25, Salt Lick, 68,3-3251 
Wright, Paul, LouBa, 638-4674, 638-4674 

Zache.-n, Vincent, 115 W. Wind Trail, Bardstown. 8-8985, 8-5913 
Zachery, Bobby G., 1925 Taffeta Drive, Valley Station, WE 
7-1747 

Corrected Address 
McNeely, Albert T., P. O. Box 203, 601 Leslie Ave., Glasgow, 
651-3290, CampbeHriville 465-8168 



BACK PAIN IN ATHLETES 

(Continued from Inside Cover) 

forward or side bending or pain produced 
on straight leg-raising provide functional 
evidence of possible disorders. 

Excluding sueh individuals from sports 
with a high risk factor may seem harsh 
when the player is able. But counting on 
such a player for continuing service can 
have disastrous results. Just when the play- 
er is needed most he may become incapaci- 
tated and an untried player will have to be 
substituted. Far better to guide the person 
with this potential into less hazardous ac- 
tivities. 

— National Federation and A.M.A. 



POINTS OF SPECIAL EMPHASIS 

(Continued from Page One) 

When an official accepts a game assign- 
ment, his responsibility is definite and well 
defined. The protection and welfare of the 
players is paramount and with this there 
can be no compromise. Any official who 
fails to promptly discharge his responsibil- 
ity of penalizing for an infraction is de- 
linquent and unqualified to officiate inter- 
scholastic and intercollegiate contests. 

— 1963 National Alliance Football Rules 



Ethics. Versus the Rules 

Through a continuing process of refine- 
ment, the football rules have been improved 
and perfected each year to make the game 
safer, easier to administer and more ex- 
citing to watch. This we feel is progress. 
Unfortunately, some restrictions have been 
adopted in the football code as the result of 
some rather questionable, if not outright 
unethical, practices by a small minority oi 
coaches who thought of ways to "beat tl 
rules." These restrictions, and further re- 
strictions that are sure to follow, cannot be 
termed progress in any sense of the word. 

"In teaching the game of football, the 
coach must realize that there are certain 
rules designed to protect the player and pro- 
vide common standards for determining a 
winner and loser. Any attempts to beat 
these rules, to take unfair advantage of an 
opponent or to teach deliberate unsports- 
manlike conduct, have no place in the game 
of football, nor has any coach guilty of such 
teaching any right to call himself a coach. 
(Take from Art. I American Football Coach- 
es "CODE OF ETHICS") 

Rule l-5-3e regarding illegal player 
equipment states that "equipment that shall 
always be declared illegal includes . . . Tape 
or bandage on a hand unless, after full re- 
port by the player's coach, it is sanctioned 
by the umpire as being necessary to protect 
an injury." It is pretty generally agreed 
that a player can strike quite a punishing 
"blow" with a hand or forearm that has 
been "protected" and hardened by layers of 
tape. When all the interior linemen and de- 
fensive linebackers appear on the field with 
both hands taped to the knuckles, and the 
coach tells the umpire that all the boys are 
wearing tape "to protect an injury," the 
official has little recourse other than to> 
accept the coach's word, even though he, as 
well as the players, the opposing coach, and 
the fans know it is not the truth. If this 
practice is continued, it won't be long before 
the rules committee will be entertaining a 
motion to rule as illegal "any tape on the 
hands." This will be a sad day for the many 
fine coaches who have maintained a high 
standard of ethics, and have abided by both 
the letter and the spirit of the rules. It is 
hoped that those coaches who have condon- 
ed this practice, will do some soul searching 
and see if they feel they are not taking 
something away from a great game. 

— The Illinois Interscholastic 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



The Desire To Win 

Our society is a jungle; a jungle of steel 
and concrete, machinery and electronic 
brains, and guided missiles and cold wars — 
all of which are constantly changing with 
atomic speed. The ominousness of this en- 
vironment bears down on man with such 
force as to cause hypertension, high blood 
pressure, insomnia, and other assorted psy- 
chosomatic disorders. 

Today, man is just as subject to the an- 
cient law of nature — survival of the fittest 
— as his oldest ancestors. Distasteful as this 
truth may be to some, the mental institu- 
tions and hospitals are overflowing with 
supportive evidence in the form of those 
who have not "survived." Ancient man need- 
ed to be fit to survive literally, and for 
this he needed primarily physical fitness. 
Today, in our so-called civilized society, and 
with all modem medicines can offer, man 
need not be greatly anxious about literal 
survival. Man today must conquer his own 
mental anguish in order to survive, and 
for this task he needs total fitness. He must 
be physically, mentally, emotionally, and 
socially fit. The number of things for which 
he must be fit is stupendous. However, if 
we were to single out just one of these 
things — the one which is probably most 
important — it would be fitness to compete. 

Man must be fit to compete because our 
society in the United States has the spirit 
of competition, competition to win so to 
speak, deeply ingrained. Take for instance 
our economic system which is based on free 
enterprise of capitalism. The economic sys- 
tem of a country or society is its backbone 
and ours is such that nearly everything we 
do as producers and consumers is a reflec- 
tion of its unique characteristics. Our so- 
ciety with all of its freedoms thrives on 
competition. It was founded on competition, 
and, in fact, has its future freedom from 
Communism totally dependent on this s^me 
competition to win. There is competition 
everywhere; for sales, jobs, and nearly 
everything else of importance to us, and 
all of this competition is toward one goal — 
winning. The desire to be on top, ahe^^d, 
first, or to win, as referred to here, is with 
us from the time we can first conceive it- 
meaning until the day we are too old to 
care. 

However, such a desire must be accom- 
panied by the proper attitudes to be truly 
valuable. In view of this need to develop a 
desire to win, it is evident that it is a 
worthy goal of education, and physical edu- 



cation is the best place to build this desire. 
By having striving to win as an education- 
al goal, we can also facilitate the fullest 
realization of other related educational ob- 
jectives of physical education. These ob- 
jectives are integrity, loyalty, sportsman- 
ship, responsibility, self-discipline, courage, 
etc. The man who has developed a self 
image through realization of these objec- 
tives and can function through it with rela- 
tive freedom from the inner anxiety o^ 
threat to the Self has an adequate degree 
of fitness to compete. 

An illustrative anology can be made be- 
tween the "ideal" citizen in our society and 
the "ideal" athlete in interscholastic ath- 
letics. In interscholastic athletics for in- 
stance, the ideal athlete plays to win with 
honesty and his best possible effort, and 
with respect for the officials, rules oppon- 
ents, teammates, and himself. He helps the 
cause of winning by doing his job to the 
best of his ability, be he first team, second 
team, water boy, or manager. He does this 
by working hard in practice and obeying 
all training rules, and by never quitting on 
the field. If the game is won, he wins 
graciously and modestly ; if it is lost, he 
loses couraigeously without excuses and 
with an increased desire to work harder, 
correct his mistakes and weaknesses, and 
try again next week. Playing to win, "get- 
ahead," or succeed provides a reason for 
hard work and a basis on which the coach 
can 'help his pupils seek and realize the edu- 
cational objectives of interscholastic sports. 
To facilitate the development of this "ideal 
athlete," it is suggested that striving to win 
be a major objective of interscholastic com- 
petition. A boy or a team should never be 
sent into a game without the express pur- 
pose of winning. These same principles are 
incorporated in "fitness to compete" and are 
applicable to the living of life itself in our 
society. 

As man presses forward in his efforts 
to better his life, he must protect himself 
from that which he creates — the never 
ending maze of environment complication. 
A man ill-equipped to confront the "maze" 
is soon rendered useless to himself and his 
society — ^he has not survived. To survive 
man needs "fitness to compete." As man 
learns all other things, he must learn to 
compete. Certainly teaching the skills need- 
ed to compete — compete to win, be on top, 
get ahead, or succeed — is one of education's 
most important objectives today. 

— Frank S. Kinsey, Ohio Universitv, in 
The Ohio High School Athlete 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



Page Eleven 



A. A. H. P. E. R. 

The State Office has received compli- 
mentary copies of the latest DGWS publica- 
tions. Quantity orders for these books are 
given special discounts. Since orders are fill- 
ed outside the AAHPER office by NEA 
Publications-Sales, a note on each order 
should state "Subject to special 30% dis- 
count." 

The books which have been received are 
as follows: Selected Soccer and Speed'ball 
Articles; Selected Hockey and Lacrosse 
Articles ; Recreational Games and Sports, 
Rev. ; Gymnastics Guide, 1963-65 ; Outing 
Activities and Winter Sports Guide, 1963- 
65; Aquatics Guide, 1963-65; Volleyball 
Guide 1963-65; Basketball Guide 1963-65; 
Basketball Rules Reprint. 

The Gymnastics Guide is a new title in 
the AAHPER Sport Library for Girls and 
Women. These guides are the official rule 
books for girls' and women's sports. They 
are deveoped and sanctioned by AAHPER's 
Division on Girls and Women's Sports, 
which is made up of women physical educa- 
tors, coaches, officials, and recreation lead- 
ers in schools, colleges and community cen- 
ters all over the country. 



becomes the thing." Accepted social traits 
are an early part of physical education 
training and must be fundamental to intra- 
mural or interschool games, rhythms, dance, 
or any phase of a good physical education 
program. 

Competition is an American heritage 
and its control is one of physical education's 
important responsibilities. Along with it, 
however, attention must be paid to good 
sportsmanship,, instruotion for the many 
who are not proficient enough to "make" 
the school team and education for those in 
President Kennedy's newly coined word 
group "spectation". Good physical educa- 
tion can teach sports, dance, and games 
appreciation as well as provide activities. 
Objectives in each instance, however, should 
be well understood. 

Physical education has the opportunity 
of contacting more students in a school 
system than any other phase of the curricu- 
lum. It deals with them in many manners 
and many moods. The physical develop- 
ment of the youngster and his relationship 
with those about him should be among 
physical education's greatest concerns. 

— ^Charles E. Forsythe, Michigan 



What Is Physical Education? Athletics and the Peace Corps 



Athletic Competition in American high 
schools and colleges is both a tradition and 
an institution. Traditionally, it came into 
the schools from the outside when its edu- 
cational implications and values were realiz- 
ed. As an institution, athletic competition is 
a reality in that today it is a part of the 
educational programs in over 21,000 Ameri- 
can high schools and 1,800 American col- 
leges and universities. That there is a close 
relationship between physical education and 
athletics is an accepted fact. In reality, they 
are so closely interwoven that each is a 
phase of the other. Balance is the import- 
ant consideration, since it affects the situ- 
dent participant, the school program, and 
the community. 

It is not to be inferred that, at any time 
or in any way, athletics should be the sole 
program or substitute for physical edtitea- 
tion. Such inference would be illogical and 
indefensible because the right kind of phy- 
sical education program begins before there 
is athletic competition and extends far be- 
yond the segment of game duratioTi. 

Physical education's first responsibility 
is to teach youngsters to play and work to- 
gether. It igives them ooportunities to 
learn and improve skills before the "game 



Much has been written about a place 
of sports and athletics in the American 
culture and about the use of such activities, 
that is, sports and athletics, in establishing 
relationships with foreign peoples. All too 
often, these writings and statements are 
read without much thought being given to 
them. However, a study of the Peace Corps 
program gives evidence that the contention 
that sports and athletics do play a promi- 
nent part in our culture is true. Here are 
devices with which America can and does 
open many doors in foreign lands. In a 
recent issue of the PEACE CORPS VOL- 
UNTEER, there are three separate pictur- 
es depicting athletic instruction, contests 
and activity which are included as part of 
the program. There is a picture of basket- 
ball being played in Tunisia, of instruction 
in traick, baseball and volleyball in Ethiopia. 
In fact, there are more pictures and space 
devoted to athletics in the Volunteer than 
to any other group of activities. This, in 
itself, should indicate the emphasis which is 
placed on this program and the important 
part athletics are playing. A varied pro- 
gram of activities has been introduced by 
the Peace Corps and a great deal of inter- 
community competition is sponsored. For 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1963 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Lexin^on, Ky. 

School Representative 

JAMES HAUSBERGER 

Cynthiana, Ky. 

Phone 234-1118 

In Stock for Immediate Delivery 

Spanjian No. 806 Pants— Football $ 5.95 ea. 

Red Fox White Football Practice Jersies $ 1.95 ea. 

Riddell & Hyde Football Shoes $10.95 UP 

Riddell White Helmets— We stripe $18.95 ea. 

All Star Socks $ 4.50 Dz. 

Bike & Cramer Products 

DCP & CP-36 Shoulder Pads 

J5V & TD Footballs 

Riddell Kicking Toe & Coach's Shoes 

Spanjian No. 229RG White Football Jersey $ 7.55 ea. 

Shur-Fit Mouthpieces $ 1.35 ea. 

Scrimmage Vests $12.75 Dz. 

We letter in our store for quick delivery. 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 277-3977 Dick WaUace 



example, the ministry of sports in Tunisia Bourgwiba villages. The skills of shooting, 

conducts nationwide leagues of competition passing, dribbling and the basic defenses 

for both interscholastic and civilian teams, were shown and explained. The group di- 

but "licenses all players and divides compe- vided itself into two teams for demonstra- 

tition according to age group". In many tion games. One of the problems was the 

respects, the arrangement for competition division of the squad for game purposes, 

is as it is in the United States. The pro- One group suggested the good men should 

gram includes cross country, volleyball, play on one team in order to give the stu- 

handball and basketball. The seasons run dents an idea what a good team could do. 

concurrently. Baseball is a popular sport The other group wanted to divide the talent 

and American football is also very popular, on the grounds that what the boys really 

The matter of eligibility, which in any wanted was to see a cose y matched game, 

league or organization means the establish- The division of talen^ ic.e.'^ predominated 

ment of standards to preserve the quality and the resulting competitioi. was rather 

of competition, is important in Tunisia, strenuous. One of the r layers twisted an 

Eligibility isn't a matter which concerns ankle, another one suffered an iniury to 

only amateur athletic competition in the the mouth, and a third broke his nose. Both 

United States for there are already viola- participants and spectators enjoyed it im- 

tions of the standards even in these coun- mensely and the name "Peace Trotters" 

tries in which the games have just been in- was suggested for the team but was not 

troduced. For example, one situation was considered suitable because "our violence 

reported in which a player shaved off his betrayed us." This is an example ot where 

mustache so he could compete with the 15 athletics serve a purpose other than enter- 

and 16-year old. During the Christmas tainment only. The athletic activities are 

vacation, one of the groups took a six successfully used here to attract and win 

hundred mile barnstorming trip in two cars the confidence of a foreign people. 
to demonstrate basketball techniques in six — National Federation Press 



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GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 

P. 0. BOX 7116 LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 252-8622 



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In Stock for Immediate Delivery 
OUR NEW NO. AFR BASKETBALL 




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Exclusive PANEL-LOCK design eliminates 
panel liftine: and peeling — assures far super- 
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ball bears the signature of Coach Adolph 
Rupp of the University of Kentucky and is 
used by the Kentucky Wildcats Basketball 
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Now that the opening of basketball season is at hand this would be an ideal time to place your or- 
der for a set of good basketball uniforms and warmup clothing. We will gladly send samples or our rep- 
resentative will call to see you without obligation. Write us or phone us, and why not do it at once? 

By the way — how's your stock on score books, sweat socks, practice pants, practice jerseys, first- 
aid supplies and other items necessary to start your basketball season? 



REMEMBER OUR MOTTO: "We Ship the Day You Buy." 



Each and every order for any type of merchandise, whether special made or out of stock, gets the 
personal attention of every person in our store. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either basketball or football supplies, call us at CHapel 
1 7-1941 or CHapel 7-1942. 

ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, ED HENDLEY or C. A. BYRN, JR. are always ready to assist you 
in every way possible. 



If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE, contact HUNT'S 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




CLASS AA STATE CHAMPION CALDWELL COUNTY 




w 



(Left to Risht) l'r..nt l{.i« : Sci.tti K.dwards. I'tle M,.i>ri.. 1 rl Slivt-ns. . 
William Fralick, Bill CartwriKht. Tom Atwood, Grcgcry Smith. Second Row : 
Kerry Curiinff, Walt Bilmpus, Joe Jaegers, Wayne Niciiolas, Gordon Pete 
Woolwine. Third Row: Johnny Beshear, Johnny Cartwriffht, Dana Getz. 



Rogers, William Gardner. John Nichols, Wayne Hartigan. Fourth Row: Paul Hunsaker, Al 
Ronnie Hnbbard. Guy Martin. Marvin Copeland, Reed Franklin, Bill Hutchinson, Lesli< 
Row: Mgrs. Jesse Head, Ken Wilson, Denny Crisp, David Barnes, Ken HoVIowell. 



DeVilk-z. HiUv Cianinni 
n Jackson, Sam Newsom. 
I, Frank Hopper. George 
Dill. Tom Hughes, Ron 



Caldwell Co. 
Caldwell Co. 
Caldwell Co. 



■ He 
Mayfield 



Co. 



Cald« 



41 — Chr stian Co. Caldwell Co. 13 

2 — Trigg Co. 2 Caldwell Co. 52 

8 — Bow:ing Green Caldwell Co. 24 

Playoffs 
Caldwell Co. 13 — Owensboro 7 
Caldwell Co, 25 — Lafayette 
Caldwell Co. 14 — Highlands 7 



Franklin-Simpson 6 
Hopkinsviile 6 
Attucks 8 
Madisonville 7 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



December, 1963 



OWENSBORO — CLASS AA, REGION I, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 

V * ^ 









r'^'.'i^^^P'^ff 




(Left to Rieht) Front Row: D. Valentine. It. Mocrman. J. Newbolt, G. Evans. B. Ralston. S. Freeman, 
D. Watkins. W. Meschko. M. Toolev. N. Showers. Second Row: Ass't Coach G. Povnter. B. Van Winkle, 
J. Hicks. T. Tvier. L. Dunegliv. R. Kassinger. B. Mailory. F. Chambers. D. MoDre. M. Walters. B. Hill. 
J. Elliott. L. Moore. Ass't Coach J. Kendall. Head Coach R. Genito. Third Row: L. Adkins. S. Tandy, 
S. Bare, D. Howes. R. Kennedy. D. Head, I. Crabtree, P. Sublett. S. Snedeker, W. Catron, T. McEnroe, 
J. Richardson. Fourth Row: D. Layton, M. Reynolds, J. Bullinglon, J. Welch, J. Posta:wight, RL Moorman, 
J. Musick. S. Estes, A. Shelton, T. Higdon. 



The 1963 Cross Country 

Tne St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 
elevtriDh ofiicial iv.rl.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, 
which was heia in Lexmgxon on iNOvenib.r 16. The 
team scoie was 102 wicn tne score oi second piace 
LouisvU'ie Flaget oeang i04. 'I'ne inuuviduai winner 
was Pat Enner of Liouis^iUj Acnerton. Ehrkr's 
time was 9:l5. Tne disitance was short of the usual 
two iTUles. fcvki,p Foole of Waggrfner was second wjtn 
the tm.e of 9:.i4, and Jim ijcnmiQt of Trinity was 
third with 9:25. 

Scores of tiie first ten teams m the atats run 
were as follows: St. Xavier, 102; Flageit, 104; 
TrinJty, 134; Atherton, 236; Newport Cahholic, 268; 
Lafayette, 274; Eastern, 28L'; Somerset, Z85; Taylor 
County, 2&6; Can.yville, 338. 

The State Cross Country Run was held at Blue- 
grass Park, and was managed by Coach i;ob Jonn- 
son. Track Coach at the University of Kentucky. 
Mr. Johnson was assisted by Assistant Coach Press 
Whelan and by members cf the U. K. Varsity and 
Freshman track teams. 

Nine regional runs had been held for the pur- 
pose of qualifying teams and individuals for the 
state event. These runs were held at Paducah, 
Clarkson, Bardstown, Louisville, -Jefferson County 
(2), Bellevue, Lexington, and Paintsville. In addition 
to the teams, several individual runners qualified 
as entrants for t:he Eitate affair. 

The order in wihich the firsit fifty runners 
finished is givan bslow, including the times of tihe 
first iwen.ty-five. 

1-Pat Ehrkr, Atherton (9:15); 2-Skip Poole, 
Waggener '9:24); 3-Jim SchnMc't, Trinity (9:25); 
4-Dan Du?ch, Flat^ft (9:27); 5-Art Greene, Newport 
Cathnlic '9:29); 6-David Mitchell, Henderson County 
(9:29); 7-Joe Warren, Taylor County (9:29); 8- 
Lloyd Winiberly. Durrett (9:29); 9-Mike Stout, 
Owensboro ('':29.1); 10-Steve Mays. Lafayette 
(9:29.1): 11-Mike K=lly, St. Xavier (9:29.2): 12- 
Chuck Roberts, St. Xavier (9:.34); 13-Bob Ullrich, 
Flaget (9:.34); l-i-L^e Bv-f ^r-^-n-.r '":3'i.l); 15- 
Ron S'ns-'-r, St. Xavier (9:38): 16-Lvnn In'^n. Ft. 
Knnx (9:39); 17- Mi^e Moore, Henry Clay (9:39.2); 
18-Larry Hart. Southern (9:42); 19-Joe Lpe. Flaget 
(9:42.1); 20-Harry Hinkle, Trinity (9:42.2); 21- 



The St. Xavier Team 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mike Kelly. Rocky Graf. Ron 
Singer. Chuck Roberts. Second Row: Bob Weis. Billy Nevitt, 
Mike Conlon, Dennis Feldkamp, Jim Schroering. Third Row: 
Coach Jerry Denny. Brother DePcrres. Lou Smith. Ass't. 
Coach Joe Heitzman, M^rr. Ed Klein. 

Rsnnie Foree, Easitern (9:43); 22-Nolan Wright, 
LafayeKe (9:46); 23-Phil Fisiter, Lexington Catholic 
(9:17); 24-Jack Jackson, Trinity (9:48); 25-Donnie 
Fust, Eastern (9:49); 26-'Calvin Chaney, Taylor 
County; 27-Fred McLane, Newport Catholic; 28- 
B:ll Maxwell, Somerset; 29-Barry Wright, Lafay- 
ette; 30-Bob Graff, St. Xavier; 31-John Fritts, 
Somerset; 32-Kelth Whitelaw, Atherton; 33-Tom 
McDonald, Flaget; 34-Dennis Feldkamro, St. Xavier; 
35- Dan Clark, Flaget; 36-Rusty He'rbig, Trinity; 
37-Bo'b Noffsinser, Owensboro; 38- Steve Barker, 
Manual; 39 Randall Brown, McCrsaij County; 40- 
Ronnie Saiber, Caneyville; 41-Sco.titie Willoughby, 
Caneyville; 42-Jack Elevens, Mead" Memorial; 43- 
N. L. Penning*ton, Eastern; 44-Bob Weis, St. Xavier; 
45- Le^iard F^'guson, Covins-tion Hn'mes: -46- 
HaroW Hu=bard, Shelbvville; 47-Paul Kunkel, Simon- 
Kenton; 48-Gary Sublet, Southern; 49-Denms Dec- 
ker, LeitcWield; 50- Bill Oldham, Atherton. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1963 



1.00 Per Year 



In Memoriam 

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, who through- 
out his active life enjoyed many happy days 
of swimming, sailing, hunting, hiking and 
playing games and sports, left the youth of 
America a legacy of health-building gifts 
which should be of everlasting benefit to 
mankind. 

To good fathers and mothers, in trust 
for their children, he left a growing recog- 
nition that the American sport of football is 
much more than a mere test of brute 
strength ; that there are character factors 
so great as to be overlooked, or unrecogniz- 
ed, by some smirking, blanket-wrapped 
persons in the stands. He challenged these 
parents to encourage participation within 
reason, to applaud generously the long 
hours of self-denial endured by boys to im- 
prove their bodies for this test of physical 
strength and mental agility. 

To boys jointly he left a Council of 
Youth Fitness, through which all useful 
playgrounds and commons may be utilized, 
ball may be played, where tennis and biking 
and hiking may be enjoyed . . . He left a 
gratifying new conception of the sport of 
swimming, and an almost universal desire 
to master this most useful art early in 
childhood — that any who find themselves 
cast in deep water far from land, as he 
once was, may survive to rejoin loved ones 
. . . He left millions of new acres of im- 
pounded waters and countless new farm 
ponds Where young Americans may go to 
fish and, when winter comes, to skate . . . 
He left thousands of additional acres of 
forest lands forever protected from des- 
truction, where a boy and his dog may in 
season pursue rabbits and quail; where 
deer and wild turkev may multiply and 
provide food and sport. 

He left a deeper interest in the winter 




JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY 

1917-1963 

sport of skiing and encouraged more kids 
to enjoy the age-old sport of coasting on 
America's inviting, snow-clad hills. 

To young men jointly he left an increas- 
ed love and appreciation of all boisterous 
sports of rivalry, such as are featured in 
the world Olympics. And he left a truce be- 
tween the Amateur Athletic Union and the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association 
which, nurtured by his gallant effort, may 
grow into a lasting peace — that America 
may retain her high position in athletics, 
and that our young men may disdain 
weakness and maintain confidence in them- 
selves and their country. 

— Earl Ruby in the Couritr-Journal 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



DECEMBER, 1963 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 5 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hieh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexinsrton. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; 
Preston Holland (1961-65); Murray; Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), 
Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville.'^ 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

^lom the Commissionei s CJffice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1963 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the forth- 
coming 19o4 annual meeting of the Association were 
elected by the prinolpals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools on ballots returned to the State Office be- 
fore No'vembeir 15. There were several ties in the 
voting for delegate and alternate. These ties were 
broken recently, with the delegates and alternates 
involved being determined by lot. The names of the 
district representatives are as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) Tom Johnson, (2) Don Stephenson, (3) 
James A. Pickard, (4) Vernon Shown, (5) John E. 
Fl'oyd, (6) Robei^t B. Fox, (9) Tom Brantley, (10) 
H. B. Kirkwood, (11) Kenneth Middleton, (12) W. 
P. Wheeler, (13) W. 0. Jackson, (14) Bown-an 
Davenport, (15) Charles S. Combs, (16) Darvis 
Snodigrass, (17) James Carpenter, (18) Howard 
Owens, (19) F. P. Newberry, (20) Lindle Castle, 
(21) Paul Coop, (22) Roy N. Davis, (23) Puul E. 
K-rrick, (24) T. T. Etheredge, (25) Bro. E ward 
Daniel. (?6) Russell Garth, (27) H. L. Hatf°M, 
(28) W. K. Niman, (29) George E. Valentine, (30) 
Evan Settle, (31) William Bell, (32) Ralph Blakey, 
(33) Donald Wilmhoff, (34) Edgar McNabb, (35) 
James L. Cobb, (36) Don Fargman, (37) William 
L. Milis, (38) H. 0. Hale, (39) Charles A. Brown, 
(40) Joe E. Sabel, (41) Elmer Moore, (42) Robert 
Turner, (43) John Heber, (44) William Sp:cer, (45) 
Leslie C. Dyehouse, (46) D. A. Robins, (47) William 
Clark, (48) Clark E. Chesnut, (49) Jerry Hacker, 
(50) Clinton B. Hammons, (51) P. P. Estrirlgo, ('^2) 
Charles Hunter, (53) Roy T. Reasor, (54) Roy 
G. Evertole, (.55) Edward Madden, (56) William T. 
Orme, (57) W. F. Doane, (,58) Ppte Grissby, (59) 
Howard W. Wallen, (60) Gail Gillem, (61) James 
McAfee, (62) Reedus Back, (63) Jack Fultz, (64) 
Marvin Meredith. 

Alternates 

(1) John West, (2) Robert G. Fiser, (3) Cecil 
Reid, (4) Eli Alexander, (5) William F. Brown, (6) 
David Siria, (7) Gerald Gamble, (9) Ivan Russell, 
(10) James Solomon, (11) A. G. Crume, (12) Joe 
Brown, (13) Jim Johnson, (14) Jimmy A. Elmore, 
(15) Jim Guess, (16) Allen Shields, (17) Al Al- 
mond, (18) R. D. Reynolds, (19) Gene Johnson, 



(20) Tommy Downing, (21) John Burr, (22) 
Reathel Goff, (23) James T. Alton, (24) Robert 
L. Robertson, (25) Bro. Bernard, (26) Harold 
Teague, (27) Harry K. Hardin, (28) John W. Trapp, 
(29) Willis G. Wells, (30) Bill Ellis, (31) Mitchell 
Bailey, (32) Lawrence Stamper, (33) Pat Wallace, 
(34) Bob Naber, (35) Stanley Arnzen, (36) Richard 
Hehman, (37) William Smart, (38) Cecil Hellard, 
(39) Charles M. Hughes, (42) Patrick E. Napier, 
(43) Bob Abney (44) W. L. HoKoway, (45) Roy 
Camie, (46) Jack Johnson, (47) Murrell P. Stewart, 
(48) Grant Reed, (49) Bill Smith, (50) D. P. 
Parsley, (51) Chester L. Click, (52) Clause R. 
Dozier, (53) J. M. Bui-kich, (54) Homer Jones 
(55) Pearl Combs, (56) James Hollan, (57) Arthur 
MuUins, (58) Oscar Bush, (59) Paul W. Trimble, 
(60) Owille Conley, (61) Phil Owen, (62) Paul 
Werner, (63) Roy Fred Murphy, (64) Ben Webb. 

1963-64 Swimming Rules Changes 

Rule II, Section z-e: Vae fulcrum snouM be ad- 
justable at least two feet forward from a paint 
5 feet, 6 inches from the rear end of the hoard, 
where particable. 

Rule in. Section l-c-4: At the sitanter's dis- 
creition, he may order the contestants to "stand up" 
any tmie prior to the discnarge of the pistol. 

Rule III, l-c-5: Any contesifaant charged with 
two (2) false starts shall be disqualified and may 
not swim the event. False stants shall be charged 
only against individual. 

Rule III, Sections 3-e and 4-d: The following 
sentence is deleted from each of these seations. 
"There shall be no anticipaition of the turn." 

Rule III, Section 10-a (new) : One counter shail 
be allowed each contestant for all individual races 
of 200 yards or longer. 

b (new): Counters shall be stationed at the op- 
posite end of the pool from the starit. 

c (new): The counit shall be given in ascending 
ord°r of lengths; for example: 1, 3, 5, etc. 

Rule V, Section 3-a: The starter sh^ll have con- 
trol over the contestants after they have been as- 
signed to him by the referee, and a fair start has 
been achieved. 

c: In intersoholastie oomipstition, the starter shall 
discharge the pistol when the leading swimmer has 
two (2) lenaj'hs to siwim in the 200 and 400-Yard 
freestyle events. 

Rule V, S°ofcion 5-a: The following statement 
in parentheses will precede Section 5 a. (If the 
ballot system or automatic timing and/or judiging 
device is not usei, the following procedure sh^iil 
be us°d for duil me»t=). The ne"v Section S-a will 
provide that judges of the finish shall be designated 
as first, second and third place judges and shall 
deitermine the order in which contestants finish. 
The minimum number shall be two judges for first 
place and one for each of the other places. 

b: The chief finifih judge shall check the indivi- 
dual decisions of the judges, indicated independently 
in wr'ting on cards sunnlied for that purpose, be- 
fore announcement of the final result of the e^ent 
is made. If there is disagreemenit among the judiges, 
the precedence in decision shall follow numerical 
order. For example: if first and second place judges 
both sehot contestant A, the decision of the first 
place judge is final. The same procedure shall apply 
in the selection of other places. 

Rule V, S6[^tion 6-a: The following sentence in 
pareritheses wiU precede this section. (Tf the ballot 
system or automatic timing and/or judging device 
is not used, the following procedure shall be used for 
dual meets). 

Rule VI, Section 1-b: Each team shall be allowed 
a maximum of eight contestants in eatih relay, any 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



Page Three 



four of whom may compate in the time trials and/ or 
finals. (This applies to State Swimming Meet only.) 
Rule VI, Section 2-c: Being designated as a 
relay contesitant shall count as an event. 

Rule Vin, Section 1-a: If rule infractions in a 
swim-off leave less than a full complement of final- 
isits, subsequent siwim-offs shall be held among those 
having committed any infraction in the swim-off. 

b. The swim-off may be held at any time set 
by the reiferee not later than foxty-five minutes 
after the last heat oif any event in which any one 
of those contestants is competing in that session. 
A contestant involved in the swim-off shall not be 
required to swim with less than twenty-five minutes 
rest between that swim-off and any of his regular- 
ly scheduled races. 

Rule IX, Section 1: Only the performance of 
the first place vi/inner (with the fastest time in 
case of a tie) will be recognized as the record time. 
Rule X, Section 1-i: If the home team fails to 
provide springboard diving facilities, the visiting 
team shall be awarded 8 points. No points shall 
be awarded to the home team. 

Rule X, Section 4: In interscholastic dual meets 
there shall be six dives, one required and five 
opti'onals. The required dive (v/hich must be done 
firsit) shall be drawn by the referee from dives 
Nos. 101, 201, 301, 401 and 510 before the start 
of the meeit. 

After the draw, any of the four remaining dives 
listed above may be included in the list of the five 
optional dives. 

The five optional dives must be selected to in- 
clude at least four of the five groups. These op- 
tional dives may be performed in any oi-der. 

Rule X, Section 5: In interscholastic champion- 
ship meets the diving competiti'on shall consist of 
five required dives, Nos. 101, 201, 301, 401 and 510, 
and five optional dives, one from each of the five 
gro.ups. The contest shall consist of preliminaries, 
semi-dHnals and finals. In the preliminaries, all con- 
testants shali perform in order dives Nos. 101, 510 
and two optional dives. After the preliminary round, 
only the 15 highest -scores will qualify for the 
semi-finals. The semi-finals will start immediately 
after the semi-finalists have been announced. 

In the semi-final round, the 15 qualifiers will 
each perform in order dives Nos. 201, 401 and one 
optional. AJter the semi-final round, the seven 
highesit scores will qualify for the finals. 

The seven finalists will each perform in order 
dive No. 301 and their two remaining optional dives. 
The winner shall be ^the corttestant with the great- 
est number of points after the performance of ten 
dives of different numbers. 

If no more than 15 contestants are entered in 
the_ contest, all contestants will perform both pre- 
liminary and semifinal dives and the highest seven 
scores will qualify for the finals. 

Rule Xn, Seotion 1-i: In somersaults, (other 
ithan flying somersaults), the turn must commence 
as _ soon as the contestant leaves the board. In 
flymg somersaults, the layout nosition must be 
mamtamed from the take-off until the body has 
rotated one-half somersalt before the diver assumes 
the spmning position. 



State Tournament Information 

The 1964 Staite High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment will be held in the University of Kentucky 
Coliseum, Lexingtton, on March 18-21. The first 
session is scheduled for Wednesday night. Three 
ssssions will be held on Thursday, two on Friday 
and two on Saturday. 

At some time in the month of December the 
Commissioner will send KjH-S.A.A. member schools 
forms which may be used in requesting passes to 
the tournament. These forms may be returned on 
and after January 2. 

Compleite sets of tickets are priced at $10.00 
(end seats, balcony), $16.00 (chair back seats and 
bleacher seats below the ramps), and $20.00 (box 
seats). The general sale of tickets (not school or- 
ders) will be conduated by State Tournament Ticket 
Sales, P. 0. Box 1173, Lexington. These orders 
shouM not be nlaced before February 1. The amount 
of 25c should be added to each remittance (not 
school orders) to pay for positage and insurance 
charges. Orders mailed prior to February 1 will 
receive a lower priority than those mailed on that 
date. 



K.H.S.A.A. 



MINUTES 
WRESTLING COMMITTEE 



November 2, 1963 

Committee Members: Chairman Orville Williams, 
Louisville; Mr. AVill D. Evans, Louisville; Brother 
Leopold, C.F.X., Bardstown. 

Mr. Sanford opened the meeting by telling the 
Committee members that he is behind them and 
gives them full authority to do Whatever is nec- 
essary to fuitter the sport of wrestling in Ken- 
tucky. Mr. Sanford gave the Committee a list of 
schools now interesited in wrestling. 

Mr. Williams spoke of his trip to Chicago where 
he attended a wresitling convention. He mentioned 
some holds such as the "chicken-wing" and certain 
"take-do'wrs" that need clarification. 

Mr. Williams said that we had two chief prob- 
lems at this time: 

1. Publicity — Mr. Sanford made it clear that 
wrestling is sanctioned by the Association and that 
the papers should give wrestling publicity. He 
thought, however, that our problem was not pub- 
licity but the lack of properly trained coaches and 
officials to carry out the wrestling program. 

2. Training of officials — It was suggested that 
a clinic be held for coaches and officials. Mr. San- 
ford said that he hoped to regisiter wrestling of- 
ficials in the future. 

Recommendations: 

1. A clinic to be held in Louisville-Kentucky 
School for the Bl'Tid-Novon-ber 16, 1°6.3, from 12 
noon to 6 p.m. ("iff'cia's' fees were mentioned. They 
ranged from $7.50 to $15.00. It was suggested that 
officials rot be forced to attend clinic at this time.) 

2. Committee should have picture taken and 
put in -JitatP newspapers. 

3. Coaches from Ashland, Danville, etc., should 
be invited to a mee*iing at Louisville to discuss some 
of the noints brought up at Committee meeting. 

4. Weight clas.=es should be set up. 

5. Brother Leopold was asked to find out if 
Flaget H'q-h School is p-o'Tiig to wrestle this year. 

STATE TOURNAMENT: 

Mr. Sanford said th^t the Association would 
suiDolv th° folloAv^ng trophies: (1) winner, (?) run- 
ner-uD, (3t outstanding wrestler, (4) medals for 
1st, 2nd, 3rd. 

It was suggested that the State Tournamei"t be 
held on the second Saturday after the first Friday 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



in February or a week before the swimming tourna- 
ment. 

The weigh-in is to be held on the day of the 
tournament. 

Rules on weight: Boy must qualify for his 
weight. He must stay in the weig-ht class in which 
he wresitles his first match after December 15 or in 
the next weight bracket above this. 

Score book: It was suggested that a book sim- 
ilar to Mr. Williams' book be used. The official is 
to sign this to make sure that there are no changes 
in weight (Everyone supplies his own book). 

Regisitrabion: This was left to the Committee. It 
must follow the regulations of the Association in re- 
gard to eligibility Hats, etc. Each team should be 
registered by February 1. One eligibility list should 
be sent to Mr. Sanford and one to Mr. Williams. 
Official weight classes are as follows: 95, 103, 112, 
120, 127, 133, 138, 145, 154, 165, 180, heavyweight 
(235 lb. limit). Wrestler may be 2 lbs. over this 
weight in January. Wrestler may be 3 lbs. over this 
weig'ht in Febniary. Wrestler can be 3 lbs. over 
this weight in Tournament. 

—Brother Leopold, C.F.X. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 



New Certified 

Bond, Jack C. 
Brizendine, Vic 
Craft, Bill 
Current, Ray 
Davis, W. Curtis 
Edelen, Ben R. 
Gruneisen, Sam J. 
Hagan, Joseph E. 



Football Officials 

Hellard, George D. 
Lenahan, Thomas F. 
Nord, Ed 
Powell, Logan 
Sacra, Gresham 
Stevens, William D. 
Thomas, Frank M. 
Watts, Shirley R. 
Wise, Billy V. 



Approved 

Allen, Charles E. 
Baughn, E. L. 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Bordy, Philip 
Brotzge, Maurice T. 
Craft, A. B. 
Cullen, Charles 
Dahlander, Ward M. 
Dallmann, James W. 
Faust, Jack 
Feix, Darl 
Fish, Leland G. 
Gour, Bob 

Green, Paul "Dutch" 
Griggs, John M. 
Harris, John C. 
Hedge, David W. 
Holbrook, William M. 
Huber, Carl W. 
Kallaher, James E. 
Kraesig, Charles F. 
Lambert, Irvin 
Lange, Wm. E., Jr. 



Football Officials 

Lucas, T. L. 
McGlasson, Eugene M. 
McLeraore, Jack T. 
Mattingly, Chartes C. 
Mereke, Frank R. 
Middlebrooks, Chuck 
Moss, James W. 
Murphy, Leo T., Jr. 
Reddington, James 
Reece, Rock 
Sapp, Edward 
Schlich, Paul E. 
Schmitt, Paul E. 
Seale, William E. 
Sellman, John B. 
Shanks, Thomas 
Sloan, Wallace 
Swinford, John 
Thompson, Jack F., Jr. 
Vaughan, Dick 
Walker, Paul 
Washer, Stanley 
Welch, J. D. 



If one telephone number is 
it is tile home plione number un 
two numbers are given, the first 
plione. 

Corrao, Phili 



!n for an official listed, 

otherwise designated. If 

nber is that of the home 



lip J.. 2321 Coyle Drive, New Albany, Indiana, 

WH 4-9990. WH 4-8454 
Greenoe, Richard Hewlett, No. 2 Willow Drive, Henderson, 

VA 6-9893, VA 7-3556 
Saylor, Ben H., 312 Vandorn St., Corbin, 2187, 2187 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 



Alexander, David W., 1384 Fontaine. Lexington, 266-1608 
Atkins, Allen R., 1808 E. 7th St,. Hopkinsville, TU 6-1531 
Armstrong, Jerris A,, 2900 Noe Court, Louisville, 451-4028 
Ausmus, William, 2305 Cumberland Ave., Middlesboro, 198 

Bargo, Lojlie, 319 Danville St., Lancaster, 792-2832 
Barlow, Bill R,. 105 Hillcrest Ave., Lexington, 254-7517 
Bedinger, John P., 7161/. i2th Ave., Huntington, W, Va, 
Berry, Bill, 1633 Jackson, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-6765 
Bibb, William C, 2903 Wesleyan Park Drive, Owensboro, 683- 

8973, 684-5261 
Bickers, Homer G„ 172 Winding Way, Frankfort, 3-0253 
Bland, Kenneth E., Route No. 2, Box 99, Morehead. 784-5712 
Bostic, W. L„ Jr„ Belfry, 363-4419 

Bowman, E. G., 687 Mt. Vernon, Lexington, 266-8111, 252-3343 
Boyd, Tommy, 7908 Greenway Drive, Lyndon, 425-5417. 637- 

1619 
Bozarth, C. H., Jr., Route No. 1, Cadiz, 522-6994, 522-6994 
Brown, James W., 102 Bristol Park, Richmond, 623-2276, 252- 

2200 ext. 2159 
Buchanan, William Robert, 615 N. Second St., Richmond, 623- 

6699 
Burchett. Joe A., 2939 Argyle Drive, Lexington, 277-9440 
Byron, Louis S., Jr., 1317 Lexington Road. Louisville, JU 

3-0337 

Campbell, Lonnie, 424 Beaumont Ave., Harrodsburg, 734-3738. 

734-3292 
Cassady, Charlttj W„ 1127 Kentucky St., Bowling Green, 3-9538 
Cavil, Leonard J., 510 E. Maple, Nicholasville, 885-4849 (Bus.) 
Chafin, David L., 136 South College, Pikeville, 7-7631. 7-7323 
Chandler, Melvin P., 20th & Ashbury, Box 656 Middlesboro, 

502, 263 
Chaney, Bobby L., Box 75, Clay, 664-2110, 664-2227 
Chipley, David, 720 Aurora Ave., Lexington, 254-1777, 255-6666 

Station No. 7 
Clater, James P., 106 W. Morgantown Rd., Box 82. Bjvling 

Green, 3-8855 
Claypool, Tho.Tias W., Route No, 2. Owensboro, MU 4-8719 
Click, Danny, Route No. 3, Richmond, 369-5307, 369-5307 
Cody, Jack B., 522 Seminole, Danville, 236-5738 
Colwell, Kenneth, Box 76, Hazard, 436-3873, 436-3873 
Corley, William H., 5225 Poplar Level Road, Louisville, 964- 

1011, 964-1500 
Corrao, Philip J.. 2321 Coyle Drive, New Albany. Indiana, WH 

4-9990, WH 4-8464 
Costigan, Jimmie, Route No, 1, Mt. Sterling, 297, Frenchburg 

SO 8-2146 
Cowles, Gil, Jr.. 2201 Lealand, Bowling Green, 2-1207 
Craft, Bill, 140 Vanderbilt, Lexington. 277-4843, 277-3737 
Crawford Thomas M., 2244 Bradford Dr,, Louisville, 458-5839, 

WH 4-8585 
Creech, Robert, Campton, NO 8-3300 
Croft, Lewis E., 101 Noel Drive, Hopkinsville, TU 6-7610, 

TU 6-2519 

Daniel, Roger T., 917 12th St., Box 15, Paintsville, 789-4123, 

Prestonsburg TU 6-2311 
Davenport. Robert B., 202 Dorothy. Danville, 236-2684, Burgin 

748-6180 
Del Conte, Arthur J., 573 Enright Ave.. Cincinnati 5. Ohio 
Douthwaite, Donald D., 6616 Merwin Ave.. Cincinnati. Ohio 
Duncan, Robert Ray, 1008 Earl St., Henderson, 6-2155. 7-3545 
Duncan, Terry T., 1708 Roosevelt St., Henderson, VA 6-2165, 

HA 5-3171 

Edwards, M/Sgt. Donald, 7762-B Littlefield Loop. Ft. Knox 
Everett, D. J. III. 709 Belmont. Hopkinsville, 5-9748 
Farlee, Harold, 2720 Field Ave., Louisville. TW 3-3201 
Farmer, Jack, Methodist Home, Versailles, 873-4481, 873-4481 
Frazier, Glenn 0„ Price, FR 7-2406 
Fulcher, Jerry, Beech Creek, GR 6-2756 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



Page Five 



CUMBERLAND — CLASS AA, REGION 4, DISTRICT I CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. David Carter, K. 1>. !'i-ln>. Bill Davis, C. Kirk, Ronald Woods, Troy 
Griffith, Rodney Stacey, Kenney Estridge, Homer Johnsnn, Mgr. Ronnie Anderson. Second Row: Toy 
Dixon. R. Cook. Gene Sherman. Mike Granato. Jim Dunawav. Jimmy Gilstrap. Dickie Gtlliam, Jeff 
Evans, Enoch Foutch, Ernest Sharp, Ass't Coach Harold Patterson. Ass't Coach Fred Parson. Third 
Row: Head Coach Needham Saylor. Ass't Coach Bill Boggs. Roy Shotton. Ed Simmons. Robert Jones, 
Roy McKnight. James Langley, Jordan Brown, Albert Johnson. Herman Lee. Ass't Coach Roland Comett. 



451-2402, 895- 

Gibbs. Harold. 215 Berry. Bellevue, 291-7575 

Gordon, Levi, 319 Elm St., Eminence. 845-5124 

Graham, Ronald E., 489 Lynch Rd.. Box 218. Lynch 

Greene, Jerry L., 431 Bamberger Rd., Lexington. 254-3061, 

254-7847 
Greenwell, William F., Clark Hall Box 208, Murray. 762-3811 

Hall, Elvis, McHenry. BR 4-3490. BR 4-3490 

Hall, Richard G., Box 204 Wheelwright, 3216 

Hall, William C, Route No. 2. Eminence. 845-5528 

Harris, Wayne, Route No. 2, Somerset. 679-2184 

Hatler, Donald W.. 330 Pride Ave., Madisonville, TA 1-3870 

(Bus.) 
Haydon, Lloyd, 403 Main St.. Springfield, 336-3495, 336-3726 
Heitlinger, Lester. 3647 Johnston Way, Louisville, 459-3699, 

896-3401 ext. 288 
Hobbs, Charles J., 627 Westview. Ashland. 324-9439. 324-2175 
Horn, Everett, Jr., Inez, 298-3423, 298-3605 

Jackson, Edward. 2507 W. 9th St.. Owentsboro 

Jarvis, Roy, Box 37, Four Mile. 337-3731 

Jenkins, James D.. Route No. 1. Bowling Green, 842-3088, VI 

2-5954 
Johns, Jerry, Box 308, Somerset, 678-5610, 678-4721 
Johnson, Gordon M., Garred St., Box 96, Pikeville, GE 7-4758, 



GE 7-6983 
1, Harvey Kern, Box 442, Shepherdsville, 543-7693, 

543-2494 
1, Victor F., 593 Mohegan, Georgetown. 2117, 632-6286 



Johns 

Johns' 

Kilgore, Roger, Maloneton, YE 2-3496. YE 2-3611 
Kretzer, Burdette G., Jr.. Box 102. Van , Lear. 789-5009 

Lee, William A., Wallins Creek, MO 4-3621, MO 4-3444 

Leiseth, Albert J., 236 Etna, Russell, 836-6139, 324-5161 

Leiiter, J. L., 212 Highland Ave.. Georgetown, 1117W 

London, Louis, 3105 Talisman Rd.. Louisville, 451-6543, 451- 
6772 

McDonald, Carroll Wayne, Jones St., Route No. 1 Radcliff, 

361-3656, 843-9103 
McKenzie, Robert L.. 1809 Chestnut St., Kenova. W. Va. 
McKinney, Adelle F., 5370-G Fisher Ave., Ft. Knox, 4-6169, 

4-5650 
Mahanes, Thomas E., Route No. 7. Lexington, 266-7366, 266- 

2007 
Marfcley, George, 7427 Montgomery, Cincinnati 36, Ohio 
Mayes, Edward, 838 Crossbill Rd.. Danville, 236-3264, 236-6131 
Meredith, Denny E., Jr., 2644 Oregon Ave., Louisville, 776-2855, 

585-3117 
Miller, Roy L., Belton, GR 6-2666 

Miller, James C, 1225 12th St.. Tell City, Ind,, KI 7-4590 
Moore, Ronnie C, 1609 Main, Murray, 753-4980, 763-4980 

Newell, Ollie, 11814 E. 12th St., Bowling Green, VI 2-0341 ext. 

211 (Bus.) 
Newman, Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Porttanouth, Ohio, EL 3-6257 

Okruch, Nicholas, 401 E. Parkland, Evansville, Indiana HA 

3-3740, HA 4-3331 
Osborne, Larry Joe, Jonancy. 639-4533 
Owens, Bruce, Main Street, Harlan, 1062, 283 



Patrick, Ralph, 4321 Granrtview. Ashland, 324-7535, 324-1111 

ext. 522 
Peay, Curtis E., Route No. 5. Bowling Green. 843-3616, VI 

3-8171 
Peters, Arthur, Route No. 1. Box 313, London, 864-5018 (Bus.) 
Pickens, Jim, 1231 Cemetery Rd., Bowling Green, VI 3-9749 
Poore, Deane, 8401 Dixie Highway, Florence, 283-2518, 283-2518 
Powers. Samuel P., Route No. 1. Tell City, Indiana 
Prall. John A.. Crittenberger School. Ft. Knox 
Prather. Albert L., 720 Price Ave., Lexington, 254-2700, 252- 

0402 
Profitt, Lawrence K., 2-A Gay St., Winchester, PI 4-6151, 

PI 4-6412 

Rankin, James M., 2031 S. 39th St., Louisville, 772-1795 
Reavy. Charles E., 3815 Foreman Lane, Louisville. 964-4251 
Redden. Robert B., Flatwoods. 836-3440 
Ricketts, Claude O.. 10005 3rd St. Road. Valley Station, WE 

7-8610, ME 4-1551 ext. 220 
Rider. Alton. Route No. 3. Elizabethtown, 765-4240, 765-5237 
Roberts. David L.. Campbellsville. 465-4415. 465-8121 
Rose, Wally, 623 Southridge, Lexington, 299-5881, 252-7847 
Runyon, Tommy Dean, Box 181, Belfry, 353-7883 

Scott, Bill, Lynch. 848-5484. 848-5486 

Sigler, Bart, 105 N. 15th St.. Louisville. BU 3-3002, 587-6508 
Silvey, Edward M., 2227 Madison, Paducah, 442-5158 
Sizemore. Aster, Walkertown Station. Hazard 
Slinker. Dennis Randal. Sacramento 
Smith, Roy M., Watts 

Smith, Tom, 11 Polster Drive, Evansville, Indiana 
Snorton. Claude, Jr.. 107 W. Edmunds. Hopkinuville. 886-6575, 
886-8278 

Versailles Rd., Frankfort, CA 7-6565, 



2114 Peabody Lane, Louisville, GL 1-0224, 



South, William F., 

CA 3-3441 
Stoess, Ray Hampti 

EM 6-4551 

Tackett, Jay, Route No. 3. Georgetown, 832-6653 

Taylor, Jesse B., Brandenburg 

Taylor, Rogers E., MR 2 Grandview Dr., Owensboro, Mtl 

4-6992, MU 4-7219 
Thomson, Jerry, 2912V> Allen, Owensboro 

Thompson, Ralph N., 649 Ivyhill, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 251-3394 
Thompson. Thomati A., 3435 Greentree Rd., Lexington, 266-8921, 

266-8921 
Trout, J. B., Jr., College Post Office, Box 1845, Berea 

Vincent, Johnny, Bee Spring, 597-3683, 697-3605 

Weber, John, 3204 Watson, Covington, 291-8662 

Welch, J. D., 3201 Hampton, Ashland, 324-3337, 324-1155 ext. 

250 
Wells, Rufus Franklin, Lewis Hall No. 6, Morehead St. College, 

Morehead. SH 3-3015 
Williams. S. Jack, No. 6 Dogwood, Frankfort, CA 3-5078, CA 

3-0565 
Willis, Leroy, 206 Oak St.. Greenville, 1454, Central City 1180 
Withrow, Raymond W.. 424 Reservoir Ave., Central City, 742W 
Woodson, Gerald, Drakcsboro, GR 6-2915 
Woodward, Roy. 1116 Olive St.. Murray, 753-4385 
Wyatt, William J., 1921 Oxford Circle, Lexington, 252-4260, 

256-3600 ext. 2780 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

Colonel Paul E. Landis, Commissioner 
of the Ohio High School Athletic Associa- 
tion, and his assistant, Harold Meyer, rolled 
out the hospitality mat to the "Dutchman 
from Kentucky" at their November clinic 
for basketball officials. Personable Mack 
Schaffer added his friendly touch. Those 
Ohio officials are alert. It would be interest- 
ing sometime to bring the "Cream of the 
Crop" from Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky 
together for a study session. Officiating 
wisdom would surely be generated. 

Attention basketball officials! Although 
a play situation permits A6 to substitute 
for Al and then Al to substitute for A6 
during the same dead ball period, such 
substitution must not be permitted if there 
is an injury situation and a coach attempts 
to abuse the rule by making this substitu- 
tion to save a time-out being charged. This 
is a November ruling released by Cliff Fa- 
gan to The Dutchman. 

Attention again basketball officials ! 
Let's count the signals you must give each 
time you blow your whistle for a violation! 
(1) Raise your hand as you blow your 
whistle to stop the 'clock. (2) The violation 
is indicated. (3) The out-of-bounds spot 
for the throw-in is given. (4) The direction 
of play is indicated. (5) Official must 
"Chop in" the time when the clock starts. 
Besides these signals, the Official must 
hand the bpll to the player for the throw- 
in. Two officials, who have been struck in 
the face by balls being tos=3ed them by play- 
ers, contend they were too busy signalling 
to see the ball coming. 

Because of the new rule which stops 
the clock on violations, it appears that 
games are running ]0 or 11 minutes longer 
this year. Write The Dutchman, Colonial 
Manor, Jeffersontown, how much longer 
your games are lasting when you send your 
nomin'ition for Game Guy of 1964. 

Rex Alexander, whose service to boys is 
widely acclaimed, is sponsoring Mike Mar- 
shall in the Gam Guy ProTram. Rex wants 
a Lionheart trophy for this fighting ath- 
lete of St. Mary's of Paducah. Mike de- 
serves Rex's interest. Polio crippled his arm 
when he was in grade school but he holds 
athletic letters and has the respect of his 
teammates and opponents. - - - Now the 
Dutchman is ready to register the "Game 
Guy Prospect" you are sponsoring. 

Murray College High gets the second 
Abou Ben Adhem award of the year and 
again it is Rex Alexander sponsoring the 




Ernie Chattin 

school for the honor. To promote sports- 
manship a bulletin is distributed to the fans 
at the games. This emphasizes: (1) visit- 
ing teams and officials are guests of Mur- 
ray College High, (2) cheer good plays by 
opponents as well as the home team (3) 
no cheering when an opponent makes a foul, 
(4) no booing of officials. 

Hardin McLane and his reallv lovely 
wife, Marilyn, have a brand new daughter. 
They also have a fine imagination evidenced 
by the birth announcement. Hardin and 
Marilyn worked out a scouting report on 
tiny Michelle Ann McLane which says: 
"She is an exceptional dribbler, wears a 
uniform of white diapers with contrasting 
plastic parts and has both Coach Hardin 
and Coach Marilyn taking orders." It's a 
cinch that Elizabethown's Catholic Boosters 
Club already has plans for this little girl. 

Hazard points with pride to Willie Daw- 
ahare, Mayor of the town, because Willie 
has been proclaimed "Mr. Recreation of 
Kentucky for 1963". The Mayor succeeds 
Ted Sanford who won the honor in 1962. 

Ernie Chattin's picture is carried in this 
column so that every Kentuckian may see 
what one of "Nature's Noblemen" looks 
like. Kids who have felt Ernie's influence 
are better kids and become outstanding 
gentlemen. There are two in Jefferson Co- 
unty, namely. Coach Earl Adkins of Fair- 
dale and Coach Larry Castle of Thomas 
Jefferson High. Any parent would be proud 
to have his boy learn sports from Earl and 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



Page Seven 



HIGHLANDS — CLASS AA FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Waldenmayer, Coffman, Berkley, Hales, Crooks, White, Biltz, Bradley, Vor- 
hees, Lawson. Second Row: Dziech, Partin, Roell, Crawford, V. Smith, Walker, Delong. C. Smith, aavron. 



Fosdick, Rankin. Third Row : Lloyd. Hug, Kuhn 
Fourth Bow: Hicks, McElhinney, Hosea, Roth, Kelle 
Meador, Ass't. Coach Kelly, Coach Hauck. Ass't. Co 
Huber. 



Kyle, Hughes. Schweitzer, Thompson. Zint. Uli'sr. 
Ross. Slater. Fifth Row: Trainer Roth, Ass't. Coach 
:h Lawson, Ass't. Coach Murphy, Ass't. Coach Herr- 



JENKINS — CLASS AA, REGION 4, DISTRICT 2. CHAMPION 



:« ^ * XM^i^^^'^i}: ^^^&:& C^f^l^^A^':' ■!> 






(Left to Kicht) Front Ki>« Iimm% W.lih Paul l.ith K.ilph Johnson, Ralph Bullion, Jimmy Dale 
Mullins. Roger Hall. Tommy Davis. Jerr\ Miiler, Bruce Caudill. Oakie Greer, Mike Barker. Albert John- 
son. Second Row: Richard Storey. Haskew Hayes, Ernie England, Thnrman Hall. Robert Cloilins, Louis 
Fitger. Ben Potter, David Bentley. Ronald Adams. Chester Mahan, Roger Greer, Bobby Harris, Mgr. Tony 
Wolfe, Head Coach Ray Ricketts. Third Row : Ass't Coach Virgil Osborne. Mgr. Jimmy Fleming, Ronnie 
Collins, Ernest Ratliff, Kenneth Blair, Phil Greer. Dick Tucker. Herman Belcher. Jerry Conley, Paul 
Hayes, James Elswick, James Stidham, Terry Wright. Mgr, Woody Preston. 

PARIS — CLASS A, REGION 3, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jim Forsythe. Tom Benton. H. C. Morris, Benton Day. Jim Shipp, Del Oarr, 
Bill Bprlow, George Doyle, David Collier, James Penn. Second Row; Tom Clark, Harrison Rankin, Clyde 
Marks. David Bannister, Larry Morris. Mickey Markham. Joseph Henderson. David Woodford, Phil 
Showalter, Bill Brack, Rodney Woods. Third Row: Bobby Markham, Bill Bradford. Louis Foster, William 
, Washington, Coach Ben Pumphrey, Richard Eads, Clayton Rankin, Danny McKinney, Tom Atkinson. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



SHELBYVILLE — CLASS A FINALIST 




(Left to Rierht) Front Row: Cirach Kays, Coach Roberts, McKee, Goble. Mason, Coach Greenwell. 3econ4 
Row: Morton, Broughton, Sullivan, Garner, Eggen, Ballard, Roberts. Third Row: Beatty. Hall, Royalty, 
Greenwell, Edwards, Settle. Fourth Row: Mon.gomery. Hackworth. Catlett, Morrow. Davis, Simpson. 
Fifth Row- Kelly, Schmidt, T. Thompson, Swigert, G. Thompson, Mitchell. Sixth Row: McGinnis, Bustle, 
Lindsey, Tracy, Crawford, Aldridge, Bailey. Seventh Row: Bridge, Hill. 

Oihcial Dickinson Ratings For The 2963 Football Season 



CLASS A 



Team W 

Murray 5 

Fulton 3 

Ft. Campbell 3 

Paducah Lincoln 1 

Trigg County 1 

District 2 

Team W 

Crittenden County 7 

Russellville 4 

High Street 3 

Franklin Lincoln 2 

Morganfield 2 

Providence 

Henderson Douglas 

Sturgiu 1 



Team W 

Old Kentucky Home 8 

Glasgow 5 

Campbelfoville 5 

Shepherdsville 3 

Bardstown 3 

Thompkinsville 2 

Greensburg 2 

Springfield 2 

Lebanon 2 

Aquinas 1 

Louisville Country Day 1 

Metcalfe County 

District 2 

Team W 

Shelbyville 4 

Anderson 7 

Eminence 4 

Boyle County 4 

Frankfort 5 

Jessamine County 4 

Harrodsburg 5 

Stanford 3 

Woodford County 2 

Mercer County 1 



Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 
21.25 
20.00 
12.50 
11.07 



Dickinson 
Rating 

22.50 
19.28 
17.50 
15.00 
14.00 
10.00 
10.00 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 
2G.25 
19.17 
18.00 
16.67 
15.00 
14.00 
13.34 
13.34 
12.50 
12.00 
10.00 



Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 

:;6.25 

21.25 
20.00 
19.38 
18.75 
17.50 
15.00 
15.00 
12.50 



Lancaster 1 

Georgetown 

Burgin 

Mt. Vernon 3 

Camp Dick Robinson 2 

Paint Lick 1 

Lincoln Institute 1 

Bate 1 

Owen County .1 1 



Du Bois 

Carrollton 

Nicholas County 

District 2 

Team 
Elkho 
Ludlo 

Paintsville 6 

Dayton 4 

Fleming-Neon . 3 

Catlettsburg 2 

Lloyd 2 

Bellevue 1 

Pikeville 1 

Morgan County 

Beechwood 

Raceland 

REGION 4 
District 1 



City 



Pin 



■ille 



Williamsburg 3 

Lily _— 1 

Barbourville 1 

Lynn Camp 

District 2 

Team W 

East Main 5 

Loyall 4 

Harlan 3 

Wallins 1 



12.00 
11.67 
10.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Rating 

20.00 
15.00 
14.00 
12.50 
12.50 
N.R. 
N.R. 

Dickinson 
Rating 

22.50 
22.60 
20.00 
19.00 
18.75 
15.00 
15.00 
12.50 
12.50 
10.00 
10.00 
N.R. 



Dickinson 
Ratine 

21.25 
15.12 
14.28 
11.67 
11.67 
10.00 

Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 
23.76 
20.00 
12.60 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



Page Nine 



LAFAYETTE — CLASS AA. REGION 2. CHAMPION 




(Left to Rigrht) Front Row: Bnzzy Piatt, Gordon Sayre, John Taylor, Ray Shields, Bobby Cooper, Harold 
Meek, David Bailey, Byron Bramsey, Ronnie Patrick, Van Suddith, John Murphy, Mike Anderkin, Kennv 
Hatfield. Roger Warner, Waido Froley. Second Row: Mike Realty, Ed Stewart, David Sullivan, George 
Hampton, Perry Bozarfh, Jim Ishmael. Jim Robertson. Jim Fishback, Devert Owens. Bill Webb, Baron 
Meek, Neal Day. Jim Teater, Dwight Peterson, Gene Kiser, Gary Kliene, Head Coach John Snowden. Third 
Row: Ass*t Coach Eddie Sellier, Ass't Coach Buck Dawson, John Pope, Jerry Rardin. Bill Freckman, 
Barry Marshall, Teddy Mims, Robbie Trimble, Terry Osterman, Roger McCraw, John Ishmael, Denny 
Wagner, John Webster, Ralph Nollenberger, Tom Borg, Charlie Trimble, Charles Finnell, Mike Cooper, 
Ass't Coach David Gash. Fourth Row : Tony Thyen, Bruce Pieratt, Barry Anderson, John Ward, Ray 
Sirkle, Doug Stephan, Mike Buxton, Leland Roberts, Tuck Evans, Roy Crouch, Bob Penny, Vick 
Welch, Doug McAlister, John Freckman, Doug Lambert, Steve Allison, Ken Anderson. 





CLASS A/ 

REGION 1 
District 1 


W 

9 
4 
4 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 


w 

6 
4 
3 
2 

1 


w 

4 
3 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 

1 

w 

7 
6 
5 
4 
B 
2 
1 
2 
1 



w 

6 
3 
2 
5 
4 
3 
4 
3 
2 


L 


1 
2 
3 

4 
4 
6 

1 
1 

L 


2 
4 
3 
4 
6 

L 


2 
1 
2 
5 
3 
4 
4 
3 
2 

L 



1 
1 
2 
4 
3 
5 
6 
4 
1 


L 

1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 


T 











T 








T 




1 
1 



1 
1 





T 



1 





1 







T 





1 



1 







Dickinson 
Rating 

as. 00 
21.25 
18.34 
15.00 
13.34 
12.00 
[2.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 

Dickinson 
Rating 

22.50 
17.50 
14.29 
14.00 
12.00 
10.00 

Dickinson 
Rating 

22.50 
18.00 
17.00 
16.00 
14.44 
13.00 
13.00 
x2.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 

Dickinson 
Rating 

30.00 
23.75 
21.25 
18.34 
18.11 
15.00 
13.34 
12.86 
12.00 
N.R. 
N.R. 

Dickinson 
Rating 

26.25 
?.S.15 
20.62 
20.00 
19.69 
19.00 
18.34 
16.67 
15.00 


9. 
11. 
11. 
13. 
14. 
14. 

1. 
2. 
3. 
4 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

1. 
2 
3. 
4 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

1. 

3.' 
4 
5 
6. 
6. 
8. 
9. 
10. 

1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 

1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 






3 
2 
1 
1 



w 

5 
3 
3 
4 
2 
2 
1 


W 

4 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 

1 

A 
w 

7 
B 
6 
5 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 


w 

4 
4 
3 
2 
1 


w 

5 
4 
3 
2 
1 



3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 

L 


2 
1 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 

L 

2 
2 
3 
3 
4 
5 
3 
2 

L 


2 
1 
2 
4 
4 
4 
B 
4 
8 

L 


1 
1 
3 
4 
5 

L 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 









T 

1 


1 






1 

T 








1 



T 












T 

1 



1 





T 









15.00 




L«u:«a - - 




14.00 








14.00 


Team 

Caldwell County _ 


Newport Catholic 
Fleming County _ 
Wurtland 

Team 

Cumberland 

Cor bin 


REGION 4 
District 1 


12.00 
10.00 
10.00 


Hopkinsville 

Franklin-Simpson _ 

Mayfield 

Christian County _ 




Dickinson 
Rating 

28.13 
22.50 






Evarts - _ 




•>1.88 


Warren County 

Team 


'"~Drstrict~2~ 


Middlesboro 

Bell County 

Hall 

Knox Central — 
Hazel Green 

Team 

Jenkins 

Whitesburg . .. 


District 2 


20.00 
14.00 
14.00 
12.50 
N.R. 


Daviess County 

MadGonville 

Henderson 




Dickinson 
Rating 

20.00* 


Owensboro Catholic 


REGION^ 
District 1 








16.00 




Belfry 




14.00 


Team 

Elizabethtown 


Prestonsburg 

M. C. Napier 




13.33 
11.66 
11. 2B 


Wheelwright 

♦Jenkins defeated Whitesburg 

CLASS \A 

REGION 1 

Team 

Male - „ 


N.R. 


K. M. L 

LaRue County 

Franklin County _ 
Oldham County __ 

Shelby County 

Ft. Knox 




Dickinson 
Rating 

25.00 




~"'District~2 


St. Xavier 




23.75 


North Hardin 


Flaget -_ 




20.00 


Team 


duPont Manual __ 
DeSales 




18.57 
15.00 
13.34 








13.34 


Clark County 


Shawnee - 




12.86 








12.00 










10.00 


Bryan Station 


Team 


REGION 2 
District 1 










Somerset 


"regionY 


Rating 

.2.60 








21. 2B 


Dunbar 


Pleasure Ridge — 
Butler __ 




19.B0 
14.00 




Valley 




12.00 








10.00 




Team 


District 2 




Ashland 






Campbell County _ 
McKell 




Rating 

25.00 








21.25 








18.00 










14.00 




Durrett 




12.00 


Rowan County _ 




Westport 




10.00 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



ELKHORN CITY — CLASS A, REGION 3, DISTRICT 2, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgrs. Willie Castle, Joe Belcher, J. D. Haynes, Guy Bailiff. Second Row: 
Willie Barrowman, Clyde Stalker, David Adkins, Butch Cure, Benny McFall. Billy Sloan. Derek Potter, 
Jimmy Jack Hunt, Norman Powell. Third Row: Larry Jones, Randy Potter. Ronald Epiing. Jody BaiKff, 
Jimmy Shepherd, Sam Weaver, Jimmy Belcher, Paul Hunt, Kelly Marinaro. Fourth Row: David New- 
comb. Gerald Belcher, Kenton Wallace. Elster Mitchell, Carmel Wallace, Ernest MuUins, Bobby Powell, 
Clifton Vanover, Eddie Potter. Fifth Row: Bobby Wright. Gary Clevinger, Wayne Black, Billy Sharpe, 
Jimmy Sloan. David Damron. Arthur IWarinaro, Bryan Potter, Steve Sloan. Sixth Row: Ass't Coach 
Bill Duty, Ass't Coach B. J. Elswick, Head Coach Jack Hall. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 
Larry — and both of them learned from 
Ernie. 

Ernie, "Chef Par-Excellence," has de- 
veloped one of the finest Y. M. C. A. pro- 
grams in the nation at Ashland. While do- 
ing this he set the tempo for improved of- 
ficiating in eastern Kentucky. He is truly 
a fine Kentuckian. A lot of Ernie's friends 
have adopted Ernie's hair-do. Reference 
here is to Turner Elrod, Elmo Head, Rex 
Alexander, Evan Settle and my old buddy, 
Aggie Sale. The Dutchman is fast becoming 
sold on this hair style himself. 

Lyndon's Percy W. Bramlebt, HI, wins 
the Com Cob Pipe of Honor for November. 
Percy has led his community well. His ef- 
forts and time given freely have caused 
Lyndon to have an outstanding program of 
recreation. 

Cliff Fagan of the National Federation 
of State High School Athletic Associations 
has signed the Dutchman as a technician to 
help produce the film, "This Is Basketball." 
The film will be made in Tipton, Indiana, 
for showing next autumn. 

Here is our closing thought: 
FOUR THINGS 

Four things a man must learn to do 



If he would keep his record true 
To think without confusion, clearly 
To love his.fellowman sincerely 
To act from honest motives purely 
To trust in God and Heaven securely. 



Smoking and Sports 

The ability to produce maximum effort 
and to build endurance for sports is related 
to the capacity of the athlete to take in 
and utilize oxygen. This raises a serious 
question as to the effects of tobacco smok- 
ing on pulmonary function and, consequent- 
ly, on athletic performance. 

Obviously, performance in any athletic 
event that demands a maximum effort, 
for even a brief period, would be adversely 
affected by impairment of ventilatory ca- 
pacity. After reviewing clinical and experi- 
mental evidence on this question, the Com- 
mittee on the Medical Aspects of Sports of 
the American Medical Association recom- 
mends that athletes should be strongly ad- 
vised against smoking. 

Ten inhalations of ciffarette smoke haVe 
been shown to materially reduce airway 
conductance to the lungs. The decrease a- 
mounted to as much as 50 i)er cent and 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1963 



Page Eleven 



CRITTENDEN COUNTY — CLASS , REGION I. CHAMPION 







(Left to Right) Front Row : Edward Vied. Larry Brantley, Charles Doom, David Haire, David Bradley, 
Dwight Little. Ronnie Mott. Second Row: Jimmy Hopper, Dennis Mott, James Murray, John Walker, 
Barry Gilbert, Thomas Vaughn, Larry Orr. Third Row: Jerry Hill, Donnie Orr. Gerald Klnnin, Ray 
Davis, Jay Riley, Kenneth Travis, David Martin. Fourth Row: Stanley Bailey. Jerry Mills. Bili Towery. 
Eddie Davenport, Butch Fletcher. Tommie Hughes. 



lasted for as long as an hour. The reduc- 
tions were attributed by the investigate^ 
to obstruction of the dr ducts resulting 
from muscle contraction, edema, and ner- 
vous reflex. The changes occurred ir 
smokers as well as non-smokers and were 
reproducible. 

In another study of pulmonary function 
and capacity, it was shown that the expira- 
tory capacity, total lung capacity, and maxi- 
mum breathing capacity were all signifi- 
cantly decreased in heavy smokers. Con- 
versely, the ratio of residual volume (un- 
expired air) to total lung volume was in- 
creased in smokers. Decrease in maximum 
breathing capacity and increase in residual 
volume are particularly important to ath- 
letes since both changes impair capacity to 
take in oxygen and make it readily avail- 
able to the body. 

Other studies indicated a lower vital 
capacity in smokers and less efficient pul- 
monary function in even moderate exercise. 
Although athletes generally were found to 
have an increased vital capacity as com- 
pared with non-athletes, this was not as 
pronounced among athletes who smoked as 
it was for non-smoking athletes. Another 
significant finding is that the pulmonary 
diffusing capacity (ability to interchange 
oxygen and carbon monoxide in the body) 
of smokers is markedly reduced. 

In summary, acute impainnent of pul- 
monary function in young smokers as com- 
pared to non-smokers has been demonstrat- 
ed. Significant decreases in maximum 



breathing capacity, which is most impor- 
tant to athletes, have also been disclosed 
probably due largely to oostruction of res- 
piratory inflow. Efficient utilization of 
oxygen in the body is greatly hampered by 
decreases in its diffusibility in smokers. 
There is no longer any room for doubt 
that athletes should not smoke. 

— National Federation and the A.M.A. 



MEDIOCRITY 

Someone has said "everything that was nailed 
down, has become loose." The breakdown in stand- 
ar,iS, both ethical and moral, is a fact that faces the 
education administrator on the secondary level. If 
ona word dominates the problem, it is mediocrity. 
Thore are few principals, if anv, who have not e.',- 
countered the "good enough" statement in explain- 
ing an inferior job done by one who is not produc- 
ing to his best ability. 

Yet, how many times the adult comes forward 
in defense of the young Student to explain or to 
argue with the educator as to an inferior job. 

Worse than this is the tendency to chide or de- 
ride one who is doing more than the minimum de- 
mands. A teacher was seen picking up a piece of 
p3per in the corridor of a High School. Another mem- 
ber of the faculty observed the act and remarked 
"now you look lik" -n ad'n'^istr'vtor". A girl, ^^ho was 
an excellent student, suddenly began to slip badly 
in the standard of her work. Guidance and teachers 
could not place their fingers on the cause of the 
sharp decline in the student's work. Finally, the 
problem was solved by the parent. The girl could 
not stand the slurring remarks and "riding" of some 
of her fellow students for being always at the top 
of the class. It became a matter of losing status 
with hT class-mates and consequently she resorted 
to mediocrity. 

A famous contemporary American, in discussing 
the siubjeet of the Common Man, remarked that 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOK DECEMBER, 1963 



Season's 
Greetings 



*7-4e KUu^aJ^4^ CaiitfiJaHAf 



GENERAL AGENT 



f i 

I W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE j 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P. 0. BOX 7116 



Life Department 
LEXINGTON, KY. 



PHONE 252-8522 



what America needs is the Uncommon Man. Educa- 
tion needs the Uncommon teacher from the class- 
room to the front office. Mediocrity cannot meet 
the challenge of our times. 

Most of those who see their school from the 
total picture, thait is, the class-room with its daily 
problems of discipline, cheaiting, inattention; the 
extra curricula activities with the incidents of 
beating the rules, fair play, sportsmanship; along 
with the contacts with the home and the community 
when problems arise, are most cognizant of the im- 
portance of the highest ethical and moral codes. 
Indeed, there is no place for mediocrity. It must 
be the beat that can be expected from each one 
with no exceptions or excuses. 

—The M.S.P.A.A. Bugle 



Coach Versus Official? 

Has basketball become a drama where 
players provide the backdrop for the main 
contest between coach and official? 

Absurd? Perhaps, a little, but is this 
not happening in some places and are others 
not heading in this direction? 

Observation of some basketball games, 
the remarks of some coaches, the antics of 
some officials, the reactions of some fans, 
and the reading of some newspaper accounts 
would indicate that the atmosphere of 
"coach versus official" does exist. 

Coach versus official! No concept could 



miss its proper target more completely! 

Since when has the role of the official 
been anything other than to interpret the 
rules of the game in a manner that will 
make for fairness and for good game con- 
ditions for the player? 

Since when has the role of the coach 
been anything other than to teach the game 
to young men and in the doing of it make 
better men of them? 

With two such similar objectives the 
official and the coach, rather than pulling 
apart, should reinforce each other in a 
"team teaching" effort that will assure at- 
tainment of the true objectives of sports. 

It is necessary that each coach and each 
official subjugate himself and any "feel- 
ing" that may exist between them. 

This can be accomolished by thoroughly 
understanding the rules and through mu- 
tual respect for each other and for the dif- 
ficult and important job that each must 
perform. 

This will leave the drama with the game 
and the player. To do anything else is to 
fail in our responsibility to the youthful 
athlete. 

— The Washington Interscholastic 



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LOUISVILLE I. KENTUCKY 




HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO, INC. 

Phone CHapel 7-1941 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



CHRISTMAS - 1963 

Dear Customers and Friends: 

We at Hunt's want to take this time to thank you for 
the opportunity of serving you given us through the 
past years. 

If in any way we have been successful in making your 
job as Coach, Principal or Athletic Director easier 
throughout the past year, then we feel that our efforts 
have not been in vain. 

We are at this Holiday Season reminding you that you 
have the very best wishes for the Happiest of Holidays 
from us at Hunt's and may 1964 bring good health and 
good fortune to all of you and yours. - 

Very truly yours, 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

ED HENDLEY 
ROY BOYD 
JIM MITCHELL 
C. A. BYRN, JR. 
N. L. USREY 
ELIZABETH RULE 
DORIS MITCHELL 
EMILY BYRN 
H. S. BOMAR 
BILLY FARMER 



^^^^^^i^^^^^i^^^^m^^^^Q^^^^m&^^^^^^^^^^^^iS^^^^^i^ 







HiqhkhoolAthMe 

CLASS A STATE CHAMPION LYNCH EAST MAIN 




r.*24'f '10' 






> > 



\ .^. 



> Imi 1 *^ \ fs»-i ^ "» .^ s =^'^«ii I ■i® ^ '^^ \ '^ -^ *'''*^ ! * 






isi/*- :ftr.?*"" rtt***®* «iKI»», 






(Left to Right) Front Row: Julius Hodges, Vern Jacltson, Lowell Flanary, Truman McGeorge, Rick Hagy, 
Gary Lewis, Lynn Pippin, Glenn Wood, Ron Graham, Dan Russell, Coach Ed Miracle. Second Row: 
Coach Morgan, Ray Zlamal, E. Amos, A. Garner, Joe Hall, P. Peeples, W. Freeman, Paul Hightower, Jr., 
Ron Johnson, J. French. Third Row: Coach Staley. John CaroU, Jim Estep, John Palko, L. Cornett, Mike 
O'BradoYich, Gerry Roberts, Wayne Robinson, D. Cuzzart, Dub Potter. Fourth Row: Coach Scott, Ben 
Thomas, R. Brown, John Crum, M. Snow, J. Hawkins, A. Gaines. Fifth Row: Ulis Price, Ed Massey, Ben 
Massey, Will Anderson, Len Clark, Frank King, W. C. Jordan. Sixth Row: Earl Smith, N. Thompson, 
Levern Jackson, Buddy Gist, Ron Davis. 

East Main — Corbin 23 
East Main 7 — Cumberland 16 
East Main 13 — Evarts 6 
East Main 13— Harlan 
East Main 14 — Hazard 25 



Jr., H. E. McClellan, Baskin, Bob Ga 



East Main 19 — Middlesboro 13 
East Main 20 — Loyal! 
East Main 27 — London 12 
East Main 41— Lily 
East Main 27 — Jenkins 6 
East Main 34— Wallins 



PLAYOFFS 
East Main 19 — London 
East Main 27 — Paris 7 
East Main 13 — Sheibyville 6 



Official Organ of tiie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Januau-y, 1964 



ELIZABETHTOWN— CLASS AA, REGION 2, DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Zeitz, Robinson, Harmon, Pettigrew, Shaw, Blair, Davis. Claggett, Reece, 
Sherrard, Brann. Second Row: Avery, Hogg, Ashcraft, Turner, Best, Cox, Smith, Cornett, Atherton, 
Langley, Gray. Third Row: Mayhew, Gamer, Goff, Moore, Burks, Joiner, Hoskinson, Daniels, Maffett, 
Galvin, Warf, Yates, Marchell. Goldie, Inman, Bustabad, Mitchell, Mace, Coach Hogg, Ass't Coach John 
Baird, Ass't Coach Hade Durbin. 



Mid-Kentucky Conference 



\y\JllLSSl 


CTixuc; »Ji 


<aA£«. 


4,AAl^J;^ 


» 


'■'Old Ky. Home 


5 










Barren River Eight-Man Conference 


'•'EKzabethtown 


4 










Park City 


9 


1 







St. Joseph 


3 


2 







Caverna 


8 


1 


1 




Shepherdsville 


2 


2 







Ausifcin-Tracy 


5 


4 


1 




Barddtown 


3 


3 







Hiseville 


5 


5 







Springfield 


1 


2 







Temple Hill 


2 


8 







Ft. Knox 





4 







Gamaliel 





10 







Le-banon 





5 







Big 


Eight Con 

5 


ference 




'■'Co-Champions 










Owensboro 










Northern Kentucky Athletic 


Conference 


Daviess County 


5 


1 







Highlands 


6 


1 





27.00 


Henderson County 


4 


2 







Ludlow 


4 


1 


1 


22.50 


Sturgis 


2 


3 







Dayton 


5 


2 


1 


22.50 


O'wensboro Cafchol 


ic 1 


5 







Campbell County 


5 


2 


2 


21.67 


Henderson 


2 


4 







Boone County 


4 


2 


1 


20.63 


Morgairfield 





4 







Dixie Heights 


5 


4 





20.30 


Central 


Kentucky 


Conference 




Holmes 


3 


2 





20.00 




Division I 








Newport 


1 


5 





13.33 


Henry Clay 
Anderson 
Harrodsburg 
Madison 


5 
6 
4 
3 




1 

4 
3 








24.00 
21.00 
15.00 
15.00 


Lloyd 2 
Bellevue 1 
Beechwood 
Northeastern Kentucky 


5 12.86 

8 11.11 

4 10.00 

Athletic Conference 


Woodford County 


2 


6 





13 75 


M-ciKell 


5 










Irvine 


2 


4 


1 


13.57 


Russell 


3 


1 


1 




Mt. Sterling 


2 


4 





13.33 


Boyd County 


3 


2 







Danville 


1 


4 





12.00 


Raceland 


1 


3 


1 




Nicholas County 


1 


5 





11.68 


Louisa 


1 


4 









Division 11 








Wurtland 


1 


4 







Shelbyville 


6 


1 





23.00 


Southeastern Kentucky Conference 


Paris 


7 





1 


20.50 


London 


6 










Somerset 


3 


2 





20.00 


Hailan 


6 










Jessamine Co. 


5 


3 


1 


18.06 


Corbin 


2 










M. M. I. 


3 


2 





18.00 


Pineville 


4 


2 







iStanford 


2 


2 


1 


15.00 


Middlesboro 


4 


2 


1 




Frankfort 


3 


4 


1 


14.38 


Williamsburg 


4 


3 







Georgetown 


1 


6 


1 


11.88 


Bell County 


3 


4 







Lancaster 





7 





10.00 


Knox Central 


2 


6 







Cumberland Valley 


Conference 




Barbourviille 


1 


5 







Cumiberland 


4 





1 




Lynn Camp 





8 







Evarts 


3 


1 


1 




Western Kentucky Athletic 


Conference 


Loyall 


2 


3 







Caldwell County 


6 








23.33 


Wallins 





4 


1 




Tilghman 


5 


1 





22.50 


East Main 


3 


1 


1 




Murray 


8 


1 





22.50 


Hall 





3 


1 




Hoipkinsv'i'lle 


4 


2 





20.00 


Eastern Kentucky Mountain 


Conference 


Crittenden County 


4 








20.00 


Jenkins 


6 


1 


1 




Fulton 


3 


1 





18.75 


Elkhorn City 


6 


1 







Franklin^Slimpson 


4 


4 





15.00 


Whitesburg 


5 


3 







Ft. Campbell 


4 


4 





15.00 


Hazard 


3 


3 







Trigg County 


3 


5 





15.00 


Belfry 


3 


3 







Providence 


2 


4 





13.33 


Pikeville 


2 


3 


1 




Christian County 


2 


5 





12.86 


Fleming-Neon 


2 


4 







Russellville 


2 


5 





12.86 


Prestonsburg 


3 


5 







Mayfield 


1 


5 





11.67 


"M. C. Napier 


1 


5 







Bowling Green 


1 


6 





11.43 


Wheelwright 


1 


5 







Warren County 





4 





10.00 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VO'L. XXVI— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1964 



.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations for some of the 
early season situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: Al dribbles by Bl who, in aititemptdng 
to maintain a position in front of Al, backs into 
screener A2, and Bl: (a) stops immediately; or (b) 
attempts to drive through screener A2. 

Ruling: In (a), even though the contact may 
be fianm, it is considered incidental and there is no 
foul. In (b), it as a foul by Bl. 

2. Play: Al scores a field goal and Bl takes the 
ball out of bounds. B then requests and is granted 
a tdme-out. 

Ruling: After the time-out, team B may put the 
ball in play exadtly as it would if there had been 
no time-out. That is, a player of team B may 
move along the end line before passing the ball 
inbounds, or Bl may pass the ball to B2, who is 
also out of bounds behind the end line, and then 
B2 may throw the ball into the court. 

3. Play: Immediately prior to the start of the 
game, the referee erroneously indicates each team's 
basket. Those indicated are opposite from those 
used for pre-game practice. The error is discovered 
after several minutes of the game have been played. 
At the time of discovery, team A has scored 10 
points and team B has scored 4 points. 

Ruling: In such situalbion, the teams should be 
directed to continue to use, or the remainder of the 
half, the baskets in which they have been scoring. 
The game should proceed with the score, team 
A 10 — team B 4. Case Book Play Sitaation 247B 
is not intended to apply to a situation such as 
the above. It is the purpose of Play 247B to cover 
in which the discovery is more prompt. 

4. Play: A individual of the defensive team 
constantly screams directly into his opponenit's 
face for the pm-pose of unnerving the opponent, 
thereby securing an advantage. 

Ruling: Excessive screaming for the purpose of 
upsetting an opponent may be considered unsponts- 
manlike and uneithical. It may be olassified as 
baiting which, as provided by Rule 10-5-(c) is a 
foul. Such actions could tend to be unfair. It is 
understood, of course, that talking to an opponent, 
without baiting and yelling at him when he is 
about to pass, make a try or advance, is within 
the spirit of the rule. But the spirit of the rule 
does not permit excessive screaming or the constant 
use of a voice at a high pitch for the purpose of 
weariing down the opponent's tolerance. 

5. Play: Driibbler Al taps the ball to the floor 
and then permits it to bounce one, or several 
times, before he taps it a second time. Did the 
dribble end when the ball bounced several times 
between taps ? 

RMing: Whether the dribMe ended depended 
upon whether Al lost control. Rule 4-5- (c) provides 
that the dribble ends when the dribbler loses con- 
trol. The fact that the ball bounced two or more 
times between taps by the dribbler dose not neces- 
sarily mean the dribbler has lost control. He has 
lost control, if the ball unintentionally, or by chance, 



bounces away. It is not too unusual for a dribbler 
when advancing the ball from the back court into 
the front court, and especially when the defense is 
retreating, to tap the ball to the floor and let 
it bounce a couple of times before he taps it 
again. 

6. Play: Al is dribbling toward his basket. Bl, 
his guard, is advancing rapidly in the same direc- 
tion as Al but is off to the side of Al, not directly 
behind him and nolt in identically the same direc- 
tion and path. Al, the dribbler, makes a quick 
sideward and backward movement, entering the 
path of B2. Contact ensues because Bl does not 
have an opportunity to stop or change his direction. 

Ruling: Foul by Al. Al, even though he has 
the bail is not pennitted to come into the path of 
Bl so quickly thait Bl cannot stop or change his 
direction. 

Comment: Except in an unusual situation, the 
infraction by Al would not be judged intentional. 
Whether it is deemed iritentional is dependent 
entirely upon the judlgement of the official. 

7. Play: With the score A 41 — B40 and 8 
seconds to play, Al has the ball at the free throw 
line in readiness to attempt a free throw. In _ an 
attempt to create a false double foul situation, 
which would cause a center jump and prevent B 
from throwing in, A3 intentionally pushes B2 while 
Al has control of the ball. 

Ruling: If the foul by A3 appears in any way 
at all to be designed or premediated, it must be 
awarfed to B2. In this situation, the burden of 
interpreted as intentional and 2 throws are then 
proof must be on A3. The severity of the act does 
not determine whether it is an intsntioal foul. An 
intentional foul always carries a penalty of 2 free 
throws. If it is ruled intentional, B2 will be award- 
ed 2 free throws aifter wthioh play will be resumed 
by a jump ball at center. 

8. Play: A^fter the ball has been placed at the 
disposal of bhe free thrower and before the actual 
try begins, the foot of Bl is beyond the vertical 
plan of any edge designating a lane space or a 
neutral zone mark, or a foot of Bl is beyond the 
vertical plane of the outside edge of any lane 
boundary. 

Ruling: Violation. The official will withold the 
whistle until Al completes his free throw attempt. 
If the attempt is successful, the violation is ignoned. 
If the free throw is missed, the official will de- 
clare the ball dead and award a substitute throw. 

9. Play: Oifficial calls a foul on Bl. Bl does 
not raisie his hand at arm's length above his head. 

Ruling: Technical foul. It is not necessary nor 
expected that the official will ask a player who has 
committed a foul to raise his hand. A player is 
expected to know the rules and comply with them. 
When he does not, he is penalized and. in this case, 
the penalty is a technical foul on Bl. It is the 
official's responsibility, when calling bhe foul, to 
make certain that the offender realizes that he is 
(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



JANUARY, 1964 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 6 



Poblished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hieh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexingrton, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 
Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville; 
Preston Holland (1961-65); Murray; Don R. Raw;ings (1961-65), 
Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville.' 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

^\om the Lyommtssione^ s C/ffice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1963 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Approved and Certified Officials 

A large number of K.H.S.A.A. registered of- 
ficials qualified for the advanced rating of Ap- 
proved and Certified as a result of the National 
Federation basketball examination which was given 
in Kentucky on December 2, 1963. The Approved 
rating does not carry forward from year to year, 
but must be earned each year. After an official has 
received the Certified raiting, he keeps this rating 
by clinic attendance. Only officials receiving these 
higher ratings are eligible to work in the regional 
tournaments. Only Certified officials Vv^ho are resi- 
dents of Kentucky are eligible to work in the 
State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 

Certified OfficiaJs 



Alexander, Rex 
Allen, Lowry R. 
Allen, Nelson R. 
Arnold, Kenneth 
Baird, Bill 
Ballard, Jack H. 
Baughn, E. L. 
Bell, Clarence E. 
Blackburn, Viley 0. 
Bowling, Roy 
Boyles, Paul E. 
Bradshaw, Bill 
Bridges, Bennie 
Brizendine, Vic 
Brown, E. C. 
Brown, James W. 



Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 
Cummins, Al 
Davis, Bunny 
Davis, Harold T. 
Davis, Ralph E. 
DiMuzio, Robert 
Drake, Richard R. 
Driskell, Earl, Jr. 
Duerson, Wm. R. 
Duncan, Earl 
Edelen, Ben R. 
EIrod, Wm. Turner 
Elliott, Carroll L. 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Flynn, Bobby 
Foster, Bob 



Brown, John W. "Scoop"Fritz, Sherman 



Bruner, Jack C. 
Buis, Nathaniel A. 
Canter, John 
Castepl, Ra'ph M. 
Chandler, James T. 
Chattin, Charles 
Combs, Keith A. 
Conley, George 
Cooper, Warren 
Craft, Bill 



Fuller, John R., Jr. 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Gettler, John F. 
Gilbert, Gerald L. 
Goley, James E. 
Green, Walt 
Grisham, Jesse R. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Hagan, Joe 
Harrell, Bill D. 



Haynes, John 
Heldman, John, Jr. 
Hewitt, R. T. 
Hill, Earl F. 
Hodgj, Fred 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Hook, B. B., Jr. 
Huter, Jim 
Hyatt, Bob 
Inman, Briscoe 
Irwin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kean 
Johnson, James M. 
Johnson, Wm. Bernard 
Johnson, Walter 
Kimmel, Jerry 
King, Jim 
King, P. J. 
K inman, J^e T. 
Knight, Bill 
Kremer, Joe 
Long, Bill 
Lowe, Gene T. 
Lucas, Gene 
Lytle, Wm. Price 
McAnellv, David F. 
McClure, W. S. 
McCoy, Hayse 
McGehee, G. K. 
McLeod, Robert N. 
McPike, Ray S., Jr. 
Mahan, Carle 
Maines, George 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Meade, Foster, "Sid" 
Metcalf, Earl L. 
Meyer, Bud 
Miller, Bob 
Miller, Rex J. 
Miller, Roy J. 
Moore, Robert " 
Moore, Roy 
Morse, Pichard K. 
Mudd, Ed 
Neal, Gene 
Newsom, Lawrence 
Newton, C. M. 
Nixon, James W. 
Nord, Ed 
Padigett, R. K. 
Parker, Billy E. 
Peay. Curtis 
Pergrem, Bernard 

Approve 

Adkins, Charlie 
Brown, Eddie W. 
Conn, John D. 
Cooksey, Marvin 
Crawford, Tom 
Cunningham, Julian R. 
Dame, L. J. 
DeVary, Bill 
Duvall, Thomas Jay, Sr, 
Emery, George A. 
Finley, Ronald N. 
Gour, Bob 
Gumm, Kenneth E. 
Havden, Samuel J. 
Hobbs, Charles V. 
Hunley, Neil P. 
Kioufetos, Spiro J. 
Laubheimer, Donald T. 
Lee, Robert L. 



Phelps, Ralph, "Rudy" 
Pratner, Wilbur E. 
Rawlings, Harold 
Reed, Charles R. 
Reed, Gordon 
Reinhardt, Myron 
Reschar, John V., Sr. 
Ricketts, C. 0. 
Ring, William H. 
Ritter, Goebel 
Roller, Otis 
Rose, Lee H. 
Robhfuss, Dick 
Ruibarts, Leland G. 
Russell, Allen W. 
St. Clair, Robei-t L., Jr. 
Sanders, Mel 
Schliich, Paul E. 
Selvy, Curt 
Settle, Roy G. 
Shaw, Earl 
Small, Bill 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Smith, Wyatt Jack 
Sosh, LaRue 
Spencer, Irvin E. 
Steenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Harry S. 
Stiff, Maurice 
Stoain, Richard 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Tarlton, Thomas 0. 
Taylor, Ed 
Thompson, Jack 
Thompson, Ralph 
Tucker, Neal R. 
Vaiible, William 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weaver, Ray 
Wesohe, James A. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Roger 
Williams, Tom M. 
Willis, Robert A. 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wise, Billy V. 
Wise, Jack 
Woods, Gene 
Wright, Paul 
Wurtz, Emil 
Yeasin, Humsey 
Zaehem, Vincent 

d Officials 

Louden, Hubert 
Mitchell, Wm. N. 
Neal, James 
Nevil, Vernon 
Omer, Harold G. 
Perry, James E. 
P Dints, Charles 
Price, James E, 
, Rogers, Howard 
Sigler, Bart 
Smith, Wayne N. 
Smtih, Willard N. 
Stith, H^nry L. 
Stoess, Henry L. 
Vanover, Walter S. 
Weiner, Richard A. 
Whitehouse, Don 
Wigginton, Al, Sr. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUAiRY, 1964 



Page Three 



1963-64 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

REGION 1 



School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


D. 1 Carlisle County 


R. 3, Bardwell 


628-5411 


0. J. Mitchell 


Tom Adkins 


Fulton 


Pulton 


697 


J. M. Martin 


Virgil Yates 


Fulton County 


Hickman 


3168 


Tom Johnson 


John West 


Hickmain County 


Clinton 


OL 3-5461 


James H. Phillips 


Faurest Google 


Riverview 


Hickman 


2070 


A. W. Greene 


Robert Danner 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


Barlow 


665-5151 


Robert G. Fiser 


Bemv Miller 


Heath 


R. 1, W. Paducah 


L 488-2491 


Don Stephenson 


Larry Powell 


Lincoln 


Paducah 


443-4884 


B. W. Browne 


John C. McVoy 


Lons Oak 


Paducph 


443-1211 


John Robirson 


Glenn Dexter 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


443-6296 


Bradford D. Mutchler 


Barney Thweatt 


Reidland 


R. 8, Paducah 


8P8-2441 


Richard L. Winebarger 


Ervin Johnston 


St. Mary's Acad. 


Paducah 


443-2677 


Sr. Thekla, SCN 


Jack McKinney 


D. 3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


382-2160 


Joe McPherson 


Rex Smith 


Dunbar 


Mayfield 


CH 7-4520 


F. L Stiger 


A. D'^wson 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 




Sr. Ann Victoria 


Joe Mikez 


Farmington 


Farmington 


345-2171 


C. W. Jones 


Larry Colley 


Lowes 


Lowes 


674-5333 


W. W. Chumbler 


Joe B. Mathis 


Mayfield 


M-yfield 


CH 7-4461 


Barkley Jones 


Jack Story 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


328-3241 


James A. Pickard 


Ken Wray 


Symsonia 


Svmsonia 


851-3231 


Cecil Reid 


Carson Coleman 


Wingo 


Wingo 


376-3271 


Howard V. Reid 


Warren Fiser 


D. 4 Benton 


Benton 


527-2511 


J. Delton Dodds 


Billy Joe Farris 


Calloway County 


Murray 


753-5479 


William B. Miller 


Howie Crittenden 


Murray 


Murray 


753-5202 


Eli Alexander 


Larry Henson 


Murray College 


Murray 


762-3824 


Verr.on E. Shown 


Garrett Beshear 


North Marshall Co. 


Calvert City 




Robert Golieen 


Charlie Lampley 


South Marshall 


R. 1, Benton 


527-2891 


Seed Conder 


William Cothran 






REGION 2 




D. 5 Caldwell County 


Priaceton 


365-2635 


William F. Brown 


George Perry 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


965-4228 


Ercel B. Little 


L. B. Gastoa 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


545-3431 


Odell Walker 


Ray Borne Pickering 


Livingston Central 


Bvirna 


988-3263 


K. T. Hardin 


George Whitecotton 


Lyon County 


Eddwille 


388-2290 


John E. Floyd 


Frank Wright 


D. 6 Earlington 


Earlington 


DU 3-5220 


Robert B. Fox 


Robert B. Fox 


J. W. Million 


Earlington 




Lester G. Mimms 


Lester G. Mimms 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


821-2824 


William Fred Murray 


Pete Waldrop 


Rosanwld 


Madisonville 


TA 1-5044 


Caldwell Smith, Sr. 


James E. Henry 


South Hopkins 


R. 1, Nortoniville 


! 676-3443 


David Siria 


James Mitchell 


West Hopkins 


R. 1, Nebo 


249-3151 


A. 0. Richards 


Lyle Dunbar 


D. 7 Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


885-8278 


Frank B. Simpson 


Wm. M. Falls, Sr. 


Dawsoiri' Springs 


Dawson Springs 


SW 7-3811 


R. A. Bslt 


Gerald Gamble 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 




Chester C. Redmon 


Gene Mason , 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


522-6653 


Arthur Wallace 


Duke Burnett 


D. 8 Christian Co. 


Hopkinsville 


886-4463 


I. Fred Porter 


George D. Neel 


Ft. Campbell 


Fort Campbell 


2645 


Bill R. Perry 


Tom Morgan 


Todd Co. Central 


Elkton 


265-2506 


Robert N. Bush 


Harold Ross 


Todd Training 


Elkton 


265-2566 


William T. Gilbert 


Jimmy Harris 






REGION 3 




D. 9 Dunbar 


Morganfield 


289-1992 


C. N. Crutcher 


J. A. Howard , 


Morganfield 


Morganfield 


389-1531 


Thomas Brantley 


Yancey Watkins 


Providence 


Providence 


667-2411 


George Wootra 


Morris Coffman 


St. Vincent Acad. 


St. Vincent 


568-2611 


Sr. Raymunda, SCN 


Robert Velten 


Sturgis 


Sturgis 


333-4008 


H'Earl Evans 


H. D. Holt, Jr. 


Webster County 


Dixon 


639-2651 


Ivan L. Russell 


Jude Talbott 


D. 10 Douglass 


Henderson 


VA 6-3701 


H. B. Kirkwood 


George K. McGill 


Henderson 


Henderson 


VA 6-9568 


William B. Posey 


Ja.mes Solomon 


Henderson County 


Henderson 


826-9056 


J. W. Duncan 


Norman O'Nan 


Holy Name 


Headerson 




Sr. Jamesetta 


James Lindenberg 


D. 11 Bremen 


Bremen 


3411 


Paul Phillips 


Bob Riekard 


Calhoun 


Calhoun 


273-3264 


L. D. Knight 


Don Parson 


Livermore 


Livermore 


278-2522 


Kenneth E. Middleton 


Carl Ashby 


Sacramento 


Sacr-imento 


736-2343 


A. G. Crume 


B'll Carlyle 


D. 12 D"viess County 


Owensboro 


MU 4-5285 


W. P. Wheeler 


Woodrow Crum 


Owersboro 


Owensboro 


683-1016 


Joe 0. Brown 


Robert Watson 


Owensboro Cath. 


Owensboro 


4-3215 


Rev. Henry O'Bryan 


John Rendek 


St. Mary-of- 










the-Woods 


Whitesville 


233-4196 


Sr. Robert Mary 


David H. Warren 



Page 


Four 


THE 


KENTUCKY 


HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 








REGION 4 






School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Princioal 


Coach 


D. 13 


Br3ckinrid2:e Co. 


Hari'iusburg 


756-5184 


R. F. Peters 


Donald Morris 




Flaherty 


Vine Grove 


828-3885 


H. W. Hunt 


Wally Johnson 




Frederick Fraize 


Cloveroort 


788-3388 


V. M. Vibbert 


Edward Belcher 




Hancock County 


Lewisoort 


927-2531 


Forrest Williamson, Jr. 


Denz^l Mefford 




Trvinffton 


Irvincton 




W. 0. Jackson 


Norman Dillon 




Meade County 


Brandenburg: 


422-4*^65 


Stuart Pepper 


Larry Bale 


D. 14 


Butler County 


Mors;antown 


LA 6-3"fi2 


W. Foyest West 


W. 0. Warren, Jr. 




Caneyville 


C-neyvills 


879-4211 


Ramon Maiors 


William Dean Lee 




Clarkson 


Claikson 


242-3061 


T. E. Cunningham 


Bowmar Davenport 




Edmonson County 


Brownsville 


597-3980 


John M. Lane 


Donald Webb 




Gravson County 












Catholic 


Leitchfield 




Sr. Jamesina 


Rev. Gerald Griffith 




Leitchfield 


Leitchfield 


259-4175 


John H. Taylor 


•Jimmy A. Elmore 


D. 15 


Beaver Dam 


Beaver Dam 


274-4478 


J. W. Park 


James E. Guess 




Csntertown 


Centertown 


BE 2-4213 


Bryan Taylor 


Randy Swnn 




Fordsville 


Fordsville 


276-3601 


Noble H. Midkiff 


Parvin Bishop 




H?rtford 


Hartford 


298-3713 


Charles S. Combs 


Charles S. Combs 




Horse Branch 


Horse Branch 


274-4662 


W. M. Ar-.old 


Ernest Don Powell 


D. 16 


Central City 


Central City 


9 


Delmas Gish 


Jackie Day 




Dnkesboro Com. 


Drakesboro 


GR 6-2210 


William Traylor 


William Traylor 




Drakesboro Con. 


Drakesboro 


GR 6-2630 


W. J. Wilcutt 


J. Hill 




Graham 


Graham 


DE 20^2 


Cecil W. Calvert 


K^n'v Arbuckle 
W. D. Snodgrass 




Greenville 


Greenville 


212 


J. Ernest Atkins 




Hufrhes-Kirk 


Beechmont 


476-2204 


Charles Eades 


Allan Shields 




Muhlenberg: Cen. 


Powderly 


146 


Lyle C. Baugh 


Bob Daniels 








REGION 5 




D. 17 


Alvaton 


Alvaton 


VI 3-80-17 


Arthur M. Reynolds 


Dallas E. Embry 




Bowling: Green 


Bowling: Green 


842-1965 


Raymond H. Herndon 


W. B. Sydnor 




Bristow 


R. 1, Bowling Green 2-1960 


Kenneth Harvey 


Lowell H-mmers 




College 


Bowling Green 


VI 2-0341 


James A. Carpenter 


Al Almond 




Franklin-Simpson 


Franklin 


586-4763 


Ronald W. Clark 


John Price 




Hiffh Street 


Bowling Green 


VI 2-1667 


Dr. E. T. Buford 


F. 0. Moxley 




Lincoln 


Franklin 


586-3342 


W. H. Story 


William Griffith 




North Warren 


Smiths Grcve 


563-2041 


Denval P. Barriger 


Bob Burres 




Richardsville 


Richardsville 


VI 2-3504 


George Coker, Jr. 


John M. Lane, Jr. 




St. Joseph 


Bowling Green 


VI 2-1235 


Sr. Marv de Lourdes, SCN 


Roy Davenport 




Warren County 


Bowling Green 


2-7302 


C. H. Harris 


Andrew Renick 


D. 18 


Adairville 


Adairville 


539-7711 


Jesse L. Richards 


Harold R. Wood 




Auburn 


Auburn 


LI 2-4181 


Jim Young 


Howard Gorrell 




Chandler's Chapel 


R. 2, Auburn 


LI 2-6492 


Morris Shelton 


Thomas D. Garrett, Jr. 




Lewisburg 


Lewisburg 


SK 5-6191 


J. M. Vance 


Bob Birdwhistell 




Olmstead 


Olmstead 


RE 4-4621 


W. N. Alexander 


James Milam 




Russellville 


Rus.3ellville 


726-6434 


R. D. Reynolds 


Howard Owen 


D. 19 


Allen County 


Scottsville 


237-3841 


T. C. Simmons 


lames Bazzell 




Austin-Tracy 


Lucas 


434-8911 


Kenneth B. Sidwell 


Charles Day 




Glasgow 


Glasgow 


651-2256 


Charles F. Martin 


James Richards 




Hiseville 


Hiseville 


453-2611 


F. P. Newberry 


Bene Johnson 




Park City 


Park City 


749-26^5 


W. L. Gardner 


AI Ellison 




Ralph Bunche 


Glasgow 


651-3988 


L. J. Twyman 


■J. F. Herron 




Scottsville 


Scottsville 


237-3751 


Bruce Stewart 


Ernest C. Neil, II 




Temple Hill 


R. 4, Glasgow 


427-2611 


David Montgomery 


Roy Withrow 


D. 20 


Clir.ton County 


Albany 


387-2891 


Perry C. Hay 


Lindle Castle 




Cumberland County 


Burkesville 


864-3451 


Leon King 


Larry McDonald 




Gamaliel 


Gamaliel 


457-2341 


Edwin Steen 


Thomas E. Downing 




Metcalfe County 


Edmonton 


432-2481 


Gr.rland Creech 


Cortez Butler 




Tompkinsville 


Tompkinsville 


487-6217 


Rrndall Grider 


John C. Marrs 








REGION 6 




D. 21 


Adair County 


Columbia 


384-2751 


Brooks Coomer 


John Burr 




Campbellsville 


Campbellsville 


465-5091 


Paul Coop 


Don Shaw 




Greensburg 


Gree.'sburg 




E. E. Tate 


Carl Deaton 




Lebanon 


Lebanon 


692-3441 


Alex Stevens 


Hubert Edwards 




St. AuKUstine 


Lebanon 


6P2-2053 


Sr. Edward Mary 


Joe B. Raley 




St. Chsrles 


Rt. 2, Lebanon 


692-4578 


Sr Jean Mark Buckler 


Robert Myers 




St. Fra-.cis 


Loretto 


865-2301 


Sr. Mai-y Carl, OSU 


Sam B. Thomas 




Taylor County 


Campbellsville 


465-4431 


Edward L. Cox 


Billie B. Smith 


D. 22 


Cave ma 


Horse Cave 


773-7951 


Wilbur Smith 


Ralph Dorsey 




Cub Run 


Cub Run 


524-2925 


Rcy N. Davis 


Kenneth R. Metcalf 




LaRue County 


Hodgenville 


358-3195 


E. G. Sanders 


Corky Cox 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH 


SCHOOL ATHLE 


TE FOR J. 


\NUARY, 1964 


Page Five 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


Memorial 


Hardyville 


528-2271 


Glen 0. Barrett 


Reathel Goff 


Munfordville 


Munfordville 


524-4651 


H. D. Puckett 


Ray Hammers 


D. 23 East Hardin 


Glendale 


854-2300 


Damon Ray 


Edwin A. Goodman 


Elizabethtown 


Elizabethtown 


7e5-5237 


Paul E. Kerrick 


Charles Rawlings 


Eliz-bethtown Cath. 


Elizabethtown 


765-5207 


Sr. Mary Anton 


Hardin McLane 


Fort Knox 


Fort Knox 


4-7019 


R. H. Dov/.'ing 


Robert Burrow 


North Hardin 


Vine Grove 


377-2210 


James T. Alton 


Ron Chumbley 


West Hardin 


Stephensburs 


852-1924 


Kf-'ineth Riddle 


Billy Johr.son 


D. 24 Bardsto^vn 


Bardstown 


348-5913 


Vincent Zachem 


Garnis Martin 


Bloomfield 


Bloomfield 


252-2311 


T. T. Ethridge 


Ernest Ruby 


Fredericktown 


Rt. 2, SDringfield 


5r. Charles Asa 


Ber.-iard Thompson 


Mackville 


Mackville 


262-2771 


Robert Drury 


Charles Hume 


Old Ky. Home 


BTdstown 


348-8473 


T. G. Florence 


Joe Holcomb 


St. Catharine Acad. 


St. Catharine 


336-3945 


Sr. Rose Imelda 




St. Catherine 


New Haven 


IJ 31Q4 


Sr. Lennora 


Craynor Slone 


St. Joseph Prep. 


Bardstown 


348-3989 


Bro. Conrad, CFX 


Clyde E. Smith 


Springrfield 


Sprinrfield 


336-3718 


Robert L. Robertson 


William W. Yankey 


Willisburs: 


Willisburs: 


375-2217 


Z. T. Lester 


Ralph McFarland 






REGION 7 




D. 25 Ahrens 


Louisville 


583-2867 


Alfred H. Meyer 


James F. Casillo 


Central 


Louisville 


584-6356 


J. W. Hackett 


Kenneth R. Anthony 


Fla.eret 


Louisville 


SP 8-9000 


Bro .Hilaire. CFX 


Der.nis Nash 


St. X3vier 


Louisville 


636-25''5 


Bro. Edward Daniel 


Joseph C. Reibel 


Shawnee 


Louisville 


774-2353 


Robert B. Clem 


John Armstrong 


D. 26 Atherton 


Louisville 


459-3610 


Russell Garth 


Herky Rupp 


DeSales 


Louisville 


368-6519 


Rev. Jude J. Cattelona 


Jack Haury 


duPont Manual 


Louisville 


ME 6-1441 


Arthur J. Ries 


Louis Tsioropoulos 


Louisville Male 


Louisville 


582-2613 


Foster J. Sanders 


Gene Rhodes 


Presentation Acad. 


Louisville 


JU 3-5935 


Sr. Thomas Mai-y 


Vivian Eunlevy 


Sacred Heart Acad. 


Louisville 




Sr. George Marie 




D. 27 BishoD David 


Louisville 


447-4363 


Rev. Clarnnce J. Schwartz 


Leo Tierney 


Butler 


Louisville 


363-2628 


H. L. Hatfield 


Warren Lowe 


Fairdale 


Louisville 


EM 6-1468 


Harry K. Hardin 


Clyde Copley 


Pleasure Ridge Pk. 


Louisville 


921-9230 


John H. Pollock 


Gary Schaffer 


Southern 


Louisville 


969-1331 


T. T. Knight 


William Kidd 


Valley 


Valley Station 


937-2300 


J. C. Cantrell 


W. B. Fisher 


Western 


Shively 


447-3221 


John D. Brown 


Jerry L. Rexroat 


D. 28 Aauinas 


Louisville 


895-9411 


Malachy Cleary 


Williain H. Kleier 


Durrett 


Louisville 


EM 8-5831 


J. C. Bruce 


Howard Stacey 


Eastern 


Middletown 


245-4161 


John W. TraoD 


William Hoke 


Fern Creek 


Fern Creek 


239-3267 


W. K. Niman 


Phil Johnson 


Ky. Military Inst. 


Lyndon 


896-1701 


N. C. Hodgin 


Capt. G. M. Bales 


Ky. School for Blind 


Louisville 


897-1583 


William F. Davis 




Louisville Ctry Day 


Louisville 


TW 5-3542 


Patrick T. Boardman 


Delmar Wallace 


Seneca 


Louisville 


451-4330 


K. B. Farmer 


Bob Mulcahy 


Thomas Jefferson 


Louisville 


9'i9-3271 


W. D. Bruce, Jr. 


R. M. Hearin 


Trinity 


Louisville 


895-6765 


Rev. Alfred W. Steinhauser 


Edd Kellow 


WiigRener 


Lou'sville 


895-0567 


Earl S. Duncan 


Roy Adams 


Westport 


Louisville 




V. M. Brucchieri 


Harold E. Andrews 






REGION 8 




D. 29 Lebanon Junction 


Lebanon Junctior 


833-4626 


George E. Valentine 


Glenn B. Smith 


Mt. Washington 


Mt. Wasihineton 


538-4227 


C. L. Francis 


L. W. Mullins 


St. Aloysius 


Shepherdsville 


543-6721 


Sr. Marv Joyce 


Gerald David 


St. Benedict 


Lebanon Junction 833-4926 


Sr. Lucina Maria 


Rev. Roger Boehmicke 


Shepherdsville 


Shephordsville 


543-7614 


Willis G. Wells 


Fred Gib? on 


D. 30 Lincoln Institute 


Lincoln Ridge 


PA 2-8863 


Whitney M. Young 


Samuel Moore 


Shelby County 


Rt. 3, Shelbyville ME 3-2344 


Bruce Sweeney 


Bill D. Harrell 


Shelbyville 


Shelb:Avi!le 


633-4867 


Richard Greenwell 


Evan Settle 


Taylors ville 


Taylorsville 


477-2230 


Harvey G. Bush 


B. F. Mullinis 


D. 31 Eminence 


Eminnnce 


845-4071 


Cletus L. Hubbs, Jr. 


Cletus L. Hubbs, Jr. 


Henry County 


New Castle 


346-8421 


Robsrt Keen 


Fred Rice 


Oldham County 


LaGrange 


BR 9-5269 


A. L. Roberts 


Ray W'rmath 


Trimble County 


Bedford 


255-3268 


Clyde Cropper 


Bruce Springate 


D. 32 Carrollton 


Carrollton 


732-5215 


Palmore Lyles 


Jack Williams 


Gallatin County 


Warsaw 


567-5041 


Walter H. Power 


Nelson White 


Grant County 


Dry Ridge 


824-5001 


Ralph Blakey 


Steve Shuck 


Owen County 


Owenton 


484-5509 


Cyrus E. Greene 


Bill Smith 


Williamstown 


Williamstovni 


823-4501 


Lawrer.ce M. Stamper 


Paul Watts 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



School 
D. 33 Boo.'e County 

Dixie Heights 

Llovd Memorial 

St. Henry 

Simon Kenton 

We It on- Verona 
D. 34 Beechwood 

Coving'ton Cath. 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Ludlow 

William Grant 
D. 35 Bellevue 

Dayton 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 
D. 36 Bishon Brossart 

Camobell County 

Highlands 

St. Thomas 

Silver Grove 



REGION 9 

Address Tel. No. Principal 

Florence 283-33'il Edwin Walton 

Fort Mitchell 341-7050 Arthur J. Walsh 

Erlar,K?r 341-7530 Rcbert M. Gschwind 

Erlanger 341-9309 Sr. Joseph Marie, OSB 

Independence 356-3541 George Edmonson 

Walton 485-4203 John B. Shoemaker 

S. Ft. Mitchell 331-12?0 Thelma W. Jones 

Covington 431-5351 Bro. Don McKee, SM 

Covington 431-3*104 H. B. Tudor 

Covi.:gton 431-1335 Sr. M. Clarita OSB 

Ludlow 261-8211 Arthur T. Tipton 

Covinaton HE 1-1«<<1 Matthew L. Masten 

Bellevue 261-2980 Roger A. Phelps 

Daytan 261-4357 Dr. W. Dwight Swa-ing 

Newport CO 1-2860 James i.. Cobb 

Newport HI 1-7100 Rev. John V. Hegenauer 

Alexandria 697-3341 Sr. Maiw Rosilda SND 

Alexandria 697-8181 Edward E. Ball 

Ft. Thomas 441-1301 Harold Millar 

Ft. Thomas HI 1-2211 Sr. Elizabeth Marie 

Silver Grove 441-3873 Robert F. Dozier 



Coach 

Jim Summers 
Norman Perkins 
Donald E. Wilmhaff 
Bob Sulliva- 
Shirlie Elliott 
Howard Brann 
David Van Deren 
Mote Hils 
Tom Ellis 

George N. Schneidar 
Carl R. Wenderoth 
James Brock 
Foy McKenney 
Frank Lyons 
Stanley Arnzen 
James R. Connor 
Don Fangman 
Lawrence Kinney 
Robert Luecke 
Richard Hehman 
Charles F. Doll, Jr. 



REGION 10 



D. 37 Bryan Station 

Georgetown 

Harrison County 

Scott County 
D. 38 Augusta 

Bracken County 

Doming 

Falmouth 

Pendletov. 
D. 39 Fleming County 

Mason County 

Maysvillc 

St. Patrick's 

Toilesboro 
D. 40 Bourbon County 

Millersburg Mil. 

Inst. 

Nicholas County 

Paris 



Lexington 299- 
Georj:etown 

Cynthiara 234' 
Rt. 3, Georgetown 

Augusta 756 

Brooksvillc 735 

Mt. Olivet 724- 

Falmouth 654 

Falmouth 654 

Flemingsburg VI 5 

Rt. 1, Maysville 564 

Mayjville 564 

Maysville LO 4 

Tolhsboro 8 

Paris 987 

Millersburg 484 



4027 
70 
32.53 
635 
4282 
3891 
2700 
3316 
3355 
-6 '^01 
6409 
3856 
5329 
2541 
2550 
3352 



R. L. Grider 
William L. Mills 
Joe H. Anderson 
William D. Smart 
Alice Kate Field 
Jarvi.s Parsley 

H. C. Rose 
Terry Cummins 
Martin Marlar 
Elza Whalen, Jr. 
Orville B. Hayes 
Sr. M. Robert 
Charles M. Hughes 
Joe E. Sabel 
W. D. Haynes 



Carlisle 
Paris 



477 Charles Wilson 
987-4545 Paul W. Pollv 



Bob Abney 
Harry Gr?ham 
C. J. Sutherland 
John L. Crigler 
Lou Cunningham 
Jarvis Parsley 
Billy Anderson 
Cecil Hellard 
Ewiffht Wolfe 
Joe Allen Simons 
Herbert Childers 
Larry Wood 
Francis A. Stahl 
Alan Bane 
J. Robert Barlow 
James Stubblefield 

Don Burton 
Eugiine Clark 



REGION 11 



D. 41 Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Good Shepherd 

Woodford County 
D. 42 Anderson 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

Jessamine County 

Mercer County 

Western 
D. 43 Henry Clay 

Lafayette 

Lexington Cath. 

P. L. Durbar 

Sayre 

University 
D. 44 Berea 

Estill County 

Foundation 

Irvine 

M?dison 

Madison Central 

Model 



Fratilcfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Versiilles 

Lawrenceburg 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

Nic'.iolasville 

Harrodsburg 

Rt. 1 Sinai 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Lexington 

Berea 

Irvine 

Berea 

Irvine 

Richmond 

Richmond 

Richmond 



223-8030 
3-8248 
227-9233 
873-4741 
839-3431 
'(48-5170 
734-3242 
885-4849 
734-4195 
9-3608 
252-5565 
277-5430 
277-4775 
252-0640 
255-5780 
252-2200 
986-3521 
723-3537 
986-4911 
723-3616 
623-4959 
623-1530 
623-5452 



Cliff Lowdenback 
Elmer C. Moore 
Sr. Mary Petronilla 
Charles 0. Dawson 
Henry Fraziec 
Patrick E. Napier 
Ttbay Rose 
Billy Lockridge 
Zeb BlankenShip 
Robert B. Turner 
Clyde T. Lassiter 
James D. Ishmael 
Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 
P. L. Guthrie 
Kirke B. Muse 

iames H. Powell 
[abel E. Todd 
Luther Patrick 
Roy N. Walters 
Joe Ohr 
W. L. Holloway 
J"mes B. Moore 
Walter Marcum 



John Lykins 
Cliff Barker 
Charles Furr 
Edward AUin 
Charles Grote 
David Feeback 
Dick Longo 
Billy Case 
Zeb Blankensihip 
Robert Anderson 
Al Prewitt 
Kenneth Caudill 
Fred O'Brien 
S. T. Roach 
Kirk B. Muse 
Eugene Huff 
Roland W^erwille 
J"mes Kiser 
Darrall Crase 
Joe Chr 

Ray Veneill, Jr. 
Russell Roberts 
Shirley Keams 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



Page Seven 







REGION 12 




School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


Coach 


D. 45 Bate 


D^rviiie 


23';-fi756 


William Summers 


Emmstt Broadus 


Boyle County 


Danville 


236-5047 


Roy Camic 


Richard Parsons 


Buckeye 


Rt. 3. Lancaster 


792-2459 


W. R. Duerson 


Dale Moore 


Camn Dick Robinson 


Rt. 5, Lancaster 


548-2208 


Earl Shaw 


Gene McFall 


Danville 


Danville 


236-6373 


Dor. Rawlings 


David Cottrell 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


792-3301 


Leslie Gov Dyehouse 


Harold Murohy 


Mason 


Lancaster 




T. F. Merritt (Mrs.) 


H. L. Steele 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


925-271 1 


Pay Ward Little 


George May 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 


758-3385 


D. A. Robbins 


William D. Riddle 


Casav County 


Rt. 4, Liberty 


787-3211 


Nathaniel Buis 


Harvev Britton 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


355-2541 


James Ledford, Jr. 


Doug Pen^dygraft 


Hustonville 


Hustonville 


34';-2611 


Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


787-3^)41 


Stanley E. Bryant 


Patrick Tully 


Liv'nffston 


Livingston 


453-2121 


Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


McKinrey 


McKinney 


346-2942 


M. C. Montgomery 


Monty Singleton 


M=mori!il 


Wayne sib ubrg 


365-7018 


Lester M. Mullins 


Doyle McGuffey 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


256-2935 


Cleston Savior 


Jack L. Laswell 


Stanford 


Stanford 


FO .5-2111' 


Lee Thomas Mills 


Dienzal Dennis 


D. 47 Burn side 


Bumside 


561-4250 


flobert R. Thompson 


Oscar Lee Fitzgerald 


Eubank 


Eubank 


379-4661 


J. B. Albrig-ht 


Jame? Reynolds 


F°ra:uson 


Ferguson 


678-5229 


Howard T. Moore 


Samuel L. Cowan 


McCrearv County 


Whitley City 


376-2213 


Johnnie Ray Laswell 


Jack Hissom 


Monticello 


Monticello 


348-2331 


Vernon Miniard 


Joe W Harper 


Nancy 


Nancy 




Herbert T. Higgins 


GarvLs Burkett 


Pine Knot 


Pine Root 


354-2511 


Clark Morton 


Charles Smith 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


679-1574 


Edward B. Webb 


Robert Randall 


Pussell County 


Russell Springs 


866-2545 


Marshall Dixon 


Allan Feldhaus 


ShoTDville 


Shopville 


274-8181 


Murrell P. Stewart 


James A. Sears 


Somerset 


Somerset 


678-4721 


W. B. Jones 


Doug Hines 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


348-3311 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Gerald Sinclair 


D. 48 Bush 


Lid a 


864-2331 


C. Frank Bentley 


Joe T. Gregory 


Hazel Green 


E'st Bemstadt 


864-2265 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Noel Karr 


Lily 


Lily 


864-4340 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


864-2181 


Leighton Watkins 


Gilbert Samples 






REGION 13 




D. 49 Annyille 


Annville 


364-2440 


Jason Kuiper 


Jerrv Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


598-3737 


Robert Campbell 


Henrv Garrison 


McKee 


McKee 


287-2631 


Zack T. Banks 


Charles E. Norris 


Oneida Institute 


Oneida 


847-2202 


David C. Jackson 


Bill G. Smith 


Tyner 


Tyner 


364-3170 


James W. Wilson 


R. B. Morris 


D. 50 Barbourville 


Barbourville 


546-3129 


Charles Singleton 


H. D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


452 


D. P. Parsley 


W. C. Sergeant 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


546-4138 


Clir«ton B. Hammons 


Harold Cole 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


1633 


P. M. Broughton 


Jack Garrett 


Whitley County 


Williamsburg 




Warren Peace 


Clyde E. Hill 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


6500 


James L. Davis, Jr. 


Alan LeForce 


D. 51 P-11 County 


Pineville 


337-2329 


James A. Pursifull 


Willie Hendrickson 


Henderson Settle. 


Frakes 


ED 7-3618 


Eobert Hen'^rickson 


Wayland Jones 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


ED 7-2435 


Chester L. Click 


G. B. Hendrickson 


Middlesborough 


Middlesborough 


263 


Shelvie Fuson 


Dare^l Storm 


Pineville 


Pineville 


ED 7-2439 


Effie Amett 


Johr Brock 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


ED 7-3300 


!>. P. Estridge 


Dons Id Feddersen 


D. 52 Cumberland 


Cumberland 


589-4625 


Lee P. Jones 


Fred Parsons 


East Main 


Lynch 


848-5486 


Sam Potter 


Ed Miracle 


Evarts 


Evarts 


837-2502 


Claude R. Dozier 


Charlie Hunter 


Hall 


Grays Knob 


2364 


Charles R. Steele 


Jame? Burkhart 


Harlan 


Harlan 


522 


Roy G. T'-ague 


Bill CriscilHs 


Loyall 


Loyall 


277 


Nicholas K. Brewer 


Charles Davis 


Pine Mountain 


Pin« Mountain 


558-4487 


Gema Campbell 


Vernon Conley 


Wallins 


Wallins Creek 


MO 4-3444 


John H. Howard 


James L. Howard 






REGION 14 




D. 53 Dunham 


Jenkins 


948 


G. V. Curry 


William Webb 


Fleming Neon 


Fleming 


855-7597 


Roy T. Reasor 


Ralph Roberts 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


024 


Eldon E. Davidson 


Virgil Osborne 


Kingdom Come 


Linpfork 




J. L. Fraziei- 


Harold Cornett 


Letcher 


Letcher 


633-2524 


Jeff B. Maves 


D. C. Taylor 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


633-2339 


r. M. Burldch 


Goebel Ritter 



Page Eight 


THE I 


CENTUCKY 


HIGH SCHOOL ATHLE' 


rE FOR JANUARY, 1964 


School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principn] 


Coach 


D. 54 Buckhorn 


Buckhorn 




Fred W. Johnson 


Raymond Hamblin 


Combs Memorial 


Jeff 


4.36-2500 


Homer Jones 


Bill Back 


Hazard 


Hazard 


4.36-3711 


John C. Stringer 


Roscoe Shackelford 


Leatherwood 


Leatherwood 


675-4431 


Ronald V. Woods 


Llovd Smith 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


672-2337 


Raleigh Couch 


R. B. Singleton 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


6-4541 


Paul C. Colwell 


Albert Combs 


D. 55 Breathitt 


Jackso.T 


666-2805 


Millai-d Tolliver 


Fairce 0. Woods 


Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


642-35ct5 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


Hazard 


251-2207 


Alice H. Slone 


Georg-e W. Comett 


Hindman 


Hindman 


ST 5-5361 


Vesper Si'-gleton 


Peail Combs 


Jackson 


J"ckson 


666-5164 


J. B. Goff 


J. B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


785-5783 


Edward Madden 


Edward Madden 


Oakd?le Christian 


Rt. 1. Jackson 


666-5422 


Willard Trepus 


Willard Trepus 


Riverside Christian 










Training' 


Lost Creek 


666-2359 


Harold E. Barnett 


Dora-: Hostetler 


D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


MO 2-2475 


Mrs. Henry A. Stovall 


Gail Hf-nderson 


Lee County 


BeattN'ville 




Elbert Hudson 


Eugene Flynn 


Owsley County 


Booneville 


593-2815 


W. 0. G-bbard 


J. D. Seale 


Powell County 


Stanton 


663-4475 


Estil G. Chaney 


William T. Orme 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


NO 8-3845 


Bill C. Hurt 


Lando Lockard 






REGION 15 




D. 57 Belfry 


Belfry 


353-7362 


W. F. Doane 


James Hutchens 


Dorton 


Dorton 


639-8832 


Charies Wright 


Ronald Curry 


Elkhom City 


Elkhorn City 


754-7981 


James V. Powell 


3obel Salyers 


Feds Creek 


Feds Creek 


835-2286 


Nelson Hamilton 


Ronald Francisco 


Hellier 


Hellier 


SK 4-8184 


P"ul L. Owens 


Bob Walters 


Joh-s Creek 


Rt. 1, Pikeville 


7-6361 


James T. Dotson 


Donald Layne 


Mullins 


Rt. 1. Pikeville 


GE 7-9194 


Landon Hunt 


Bun Jack Burnette 


Phelps 


Phelps 


456-9310 


J. H. Cromer 


James E. Carter 


Pikeville 


P'keville 


GE 7-6870 


Paul D. Hinkle 


Carl Mims 


Virgie 


Virgie 


639-2774 


Fred W. Cox 


Maurice Dale Trivitte 


D. 58 Bctsv Layne 


Betsy Layne 


GR 8-2255 


D. W. Howard 


Oscar F. Bush 


Garrett 


Garrett 


358-3461 


Burnice Gearheart 


John Camob'^ll, Jr. 


McDowell 


McDowell 




George L. Moore 


Pete Grigsby, Jr. 


Martin 


Martin 


285-3011 


Jim-^s W. Salisbury 


Denzil Halbert 


Maytown 


Langley 


BU 5-3346 


Fdwin V. St°wart 


Lois E. Erasure 


Prestonsburg 


Prestonsburg 


6-2252 


Woodrow Allen 


Jick W ells 


Wayland 


Waybnd 


358-3911 


James V. Bolen , 


Thom-s Boyd 


Wheelwright 


Wh-'elwright 


938-2110 


Boone Hall 


Don Wallen 


D. 59 Blaine 


Blaine 


652-3«24 


Max E. C"!houn 


Joe Paul Blankenship 


Fht Gap 


Flat Gap 


265-2164 


Virgil Porter 


Carroll Burchett 


Inez 


Inez 


298-3264 


Russell Williamson 


Bobbv Williamson 


Louisa 


Louisa 


638-4.574 


Paul Wright 


Hershel Walsh 


Meade Memorial 


WilliamsDort 


789-5050 


Harold L. Preston 


Howard W. Wallen 


Pair.'tsville 


Paints ville 


789-3881 


Paul W. Trimble 


James Wheeler 


Van Lear 


Van Lear 


789-4932 


Hysell Burchett 


Howarl Ramey 


Warfield 


Warfield 


395-5341 


Russell H. Stepp 


John Willi--'ms 


D. 60 Ezel 


Ezel 


PA 5-4545 


Ezra Bach 


Henry E. Cochran 


Moreran County 


West Liberty 


SH 3-3705 


Elmer D. Anderson 


Gail Gillem 


Oil Springs 


Oil Springs 


297-3674 


Willis H. Conley 


Orville D. Conley 


Salyersville 


Salversville 


99,3 


Creed Arnett 


Robert L. Slorne 


Sandy Hook 


Sandy Hook 


RE 8-5225 


John H. Vansant 


Gary P. Fraley 






REGION 16 




D. 61 Camargo 


Mt. Sterling 


1500 


J. B. Cunningham 


Julian R. Cunningham 


DuBois 


Mt. Sterling 


952 


Arthur Hawkins 


William Elster 


George Rogers Clark 


Winchester 


744-6111 


Letcher Norton 


Lewis Snowden 


Montgomery Co. 


Mt. Sterling 


266 


Calvin Hunt 


Robert Crawford 


Mt. Stirling 


Mt. Sterling 


956 


James McAfee 


Phil Owen 


St. Agatha Acad. 


Winchester 


744-6484 


Sr. C''roline Mary 


Homer Fanning 


D. 62 Bath County 


Owingsville 


674-2501 


Edsel L. Karrick 


Tom Evans 


Breckinridge Trng. 


Mor^he-'d 


ST 4-4181 


Reedus Back 


John Allen 


Menifee County 


Frenchburg 


S08-2373 


Hiram C. Walters 


Hirrv Howard 


Rowan County 


Morahead 


ST 4-4153 


Russell Boyd 


Warren Cooper 


D. 63 Carter 


Carter 


474-6121 


Thomas E. Phillaps 


Dennie Burton 


Hitchins 


Hitchins 


474-5784 


Leonard D. Marshall 


Rov Murphy 


Lewis County 


Vanceburg 


796-5441 


Teddy Applegate 


R"V Allen 


McKell 


South Shore 


YE 2-3323 


Charles E. Mullins 


RoJDert Crotty 


Olive Hill 


Olive Hill 


326-4591 


Glenn M. Sparks 


Andrew J. Fultz 


Prichard 


Grayson 




John R. Hartig 


Dickie Vincent 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



Page Nine 



School 


Address 


Tel. No. 


Principal 


64 Boyd County 


Ashland 


739-4428 


Cobbie Lee 


Catlettsburg 


Catlettsburg 


739-4663 


Jack Clifford 


Fairview 


Westwood 


4-9226 


Webb Young 


Greenup 


GreenuD 


473-3781 


Ethel McBrayer 


Holy Family 


Ashland 




Sr. Mary, CDP 


Psul G. Blazer 


Ashland 


325-4706 


H. L. Ellis 


Raceland 


Raceland 


836-8221 


H. R. Bowling 


Russell 


Russell 


836-5120 


Frank V. Firestine 


So. Portsmouth 


So. Portsmouth 


YE 2-3221 


Foster Meade 


Wurtland 


Wurtland 


836-5931 


Ben Webb 



Heatstroke 



Thirteen deaths in high school and college foot- 
ball since 1959 have been attributed to heatstroke 
and all of them could have been prevented, accord- 
ing to the November 25th issue of Sports Illustrated. 
The culprit, says the article, is the football uni- 
form. Well-designed to protect the player from 
outside violence, it can be a disastrous heat accum- 
ulator. 

The essential research into the subject has been 
conducted at Ohio State University. Dr. William F. 
Ashe, one of the world's foremost authorities on 
heat stress and a participating doctor in the study 
at OSU, is quoted as saying: "Under certain condi- 
tions, the uniform can be a death trap." 

Heat exhaustion and heatstroke, to which foot- 
ball players are particularly susceptible and which 
have led to such fatal results in tlhe sport, can be 
brought on when sweat is prevented from evaporat- 
ing properly: instead of cooling as it should, the 
body temperature rises rapidly. When it reaches 
106°, the central nervous system can not cope with 
the load. Death is very likely to occur when the 
internal temperature reaches 110°. Half the cases 
of heatstroke are fatal; even in cases where a 
life is saved by quick attention . . . brain damage 
may occur. 

According to Sports Illustrated, which describes 
the techniques of the research, the OiSU team found 
by comparing athletic activity in a sci-ub suit 
(a loose-fitting garment) and activity in a football 
uniform that both temperature and water loss in- 
crease markedly when the uniform is worn. More 
important, the article reports, "the temperature of 
the subject in a football uniform continued to rise 
after he stopped exercising and dropped to normal 
much more slowly." Pinpointed as the most culpable 
areas of the uniform are the padded sections and 
the helmet. Means of allowing greater air penetra- 
tion are indicated. 

The hazards of heat stress. Sports Illustrated 
reports, can be reduced in other ways. OSU ex- 
perience has shown that: 

Players should be "acclimatized" to the heat 
load to be borne; a 5-6 day program, for 90% pro- 
tection, is outlined. 

Players should remove their helmets in lulls 
during practice or timeouts. 

Players should be allowed to drink water free- 
ly while working out and playing, provided they 
continue to take salt along with it. 

Practice and game sessions should be adapted 
to weather conditions. There are various recommend- 
ations h^re, but "when the temperature turns be- 
tween 90° and 100° and the humidity is at 70%, 
practice should be postponed or sharply curtailed." 

A full acclimatization program is being conducted 
at the Universitv of Oklahoma und^r Coach Bud 
Wilkinson and Trainer Ken Rawlinson. It is de- 
scribed in the article and is cited as a model of 
how much can be done under present conditions. 

— Sports Illustrated Press 



Coach 

Jim McKenzie 
Larry McKenzie 
William Davidson 
Ramey Fletcher 
Robert L. Gilmore 
Robert G. Wright 
Tom Hamilton 
Marvin Meredith 
Donnie Gaur.ce 
Larry Jordon 

National Federation Bulletin 

We call your attention to a change in the 1964 
baseball rules which will require that EACH RUN- 
NER, as well as each batter, WEAR A HEAD 
PROTECTOR. 

In most instances, this change will not require 
the puchase of additional equipment. In some sit- 
uations, it may and we, therefore, send you this 
bulletin now so that, if you believe it advisable, 
you can notify your member schools of the change 
well in advance of the beginning of the baseball 
season. We have generally found it to be advan- 
tageous to make such notification early, particularly 
when equipment is involved. 

For your information, the change in Rule 1-1-5 
in the entirely is as follows: 

"It is MANDATORY .that each batter and RUN- 
NER wear a head protector. The catcher shall wear 
a face mask and body protector. Failure to comply 
with the umpire's order to secure such equipment 
results in a batter or i-unner being declared out, 
or a catcher being replaced. 

Note: The head protector should be a type which 
has safety features equal to or grater than those 
provided by a full plastic cap with padding on the 
inside. Each state association, or any conference 
it desigTiates, is authorized to experiment with 
declaring a player out without warning if he is 
not wearing a head protector when he is a batter 
or a runner." 

— Clifford B. Fagan, Secretary 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the Phoenix Hotel, Lexingiton, on Saturday 
morning, December 21, 19fi3. The meeting 
was called to order by President Cecil A. 
Thornton at 11:00, with all Board members, 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford and Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Gran C. Teater, that the reading of the 
minutes of the September 28th meeting be 
waived, since the members of the Board 
had received copies of these minutes. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the 
1963 football championship playoffs had 
been very successful, although inclement 
weather had affected adversely ticket sales 
in some of the games. He stated that ticket 
sales for the Class A and Class AA games 
(Continued on Page Twenty) 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



The Flying Dutchman 




Howard Gardner 

Howard Gardner, one of the greatest 
of them all, has been forced by a health 
problem to hang up his whistle. The "Pride 
of Elizabethtown" has brought increased 
efficiency to officiating in his sixth region. 
Respected by everybody, this young leader 
is cancelling forty games and a district 
tournament — ^but he will continue to serve 
as sixth region representative for officials. 

Apparently basketball games will not 
last much longer because of time-out for 
violations. Fort Knox and E'town started a 
varsity game at 8:05 P.M. and finished it 
at 9:10 P.M. Officials Ed Taylor and Nor- 
man Kercler kept the game moving and 
coaches Bob Burrow and Charlie Rawlinigs 
had their players so well prepared on time- 
outs and substitutions that little time was 
lost. Officials Kean Jenkins, Jerry Gilbert, 
Richard Morse and Irby Hummer of the 
South Central Officials Association like the 
change. 

There has been real officiating progress 
in the sixth region. In 1955 this area had 
three basketball officials; today there are 
thirty-five. Sal Matarazzo of Fort Knox 
and Daymon Ray of East Hardin gave 
Howard Gardner a lot of help and con- 
tributed to this "Story of Progress." 

The Dutchman salutes Kean Jenkins for 
his years of unselfish service to young 
people. Besides directing E'town park and 
recreation proigram, this winner of the first 
Com Cob Pipe Award of 1964 gives the 



rest of his time to the kids of Hardin 
County. Puff away on your "Cob", Kean. 
You've earned it. 

Suppose you were a spectator at a soft- 
ball game and suddenly uniformed police 
grabbed the base umpire, hustled him to a 
patrol car and drove away! What would 
you think if that umpire were Charlie 
Irwin, state tournament basketball of- 
ficial? The fact is that Charlie was being 
high-pressured to referee a football game 
between Christian County and Sturgis. The 
police were sent to insist that he suljstitute 
for an official who failed to show up. 




Charlie Irwin 

Hopkinsville is a town with fine imagina- 
tion. It is also a city of firsts for the year 
of 1963. It was the first time police were 
used to procure a basketball official who 
was umpiring a softball game to referee 
a football game, and it was the first time 
that Kentucky sent Hop'town word that it 
wanted one of its boys in Frankfort to run 
the Commonwealth for the next four years. 
Good luck, Ned. If you need help, send the 
state patrol for Charlie Irwin. 

Duke Burnett of Cadiz has nominated 
John Graham for the Game Guy Award. 
Johnny has already received his lionheart 
statuette. Here's what Dr. Thorton Bryan, 
Jr., has to say about Johnny: "When Dr. 
Benjamin Fowler and I operated on John's 
feet in 1959, we both predicted that his 
sports career was essentially ended." In 
1963 Dr. Bryan says this: "I cannot possi- 
bly give John the amount of praise which 
he deserves for overcoming this disability." 
Johnny's courage is a fine inspiration for 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUAEY, 1964 



Page Elevem 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Chester C. Redmon will be the delegate from 
District 7 to the forthcoming annual meeting of 
the K-H.SjV.A. Gerald Gamble will be the alternate, 
as previously announced. Harold Ross is the District 
8 delegate, Tom Morgan the alternate. 

US in this new year. 

To Trigig County High goes the Abou 
Ben Adhem citation for January. Check 
Trigg's qualifications: (1) courtesy to 
visiting teams and officials, (2) interest 
in unfortunate kids temporarily floored by 
handicaps, (3) a student body which real- 
izes that Trigg's reputation is what the 
students make it. May your tribe increase! 

Danville's plumpy and popular Briscoe 
Inman has always been one of Kentucky's 
best college coaches and high school of- 
ficials, and now he qualifies as a reporter. 
Take a gander at the news he has gathered 
for The Dutchman in the twelfth region: 

First he tells us that the most glamor- 
ous of Ted's sixteen regional representa- 
tives was introduced to college officiating 
at Centre this month. Reference here is to 
northern Kentucky's answer to Errol Flynn 
(not Bobby), big George Maines. The 
Dutchman spent an evening with George, 
Ed McNabb and Tom "Big Daddy" Ellis 
at their Northern Kentucky Officials meet- 
ing at Covington this month. The steaks 
those chaps eat would challenge the 
prowess of Kentucky's champion steak- 
eater, Donnie Schmied, of Bowling Green. 
Ernie Chattin should charcoal a few for 
these guys. 

The London Basketball Officials Assoc- 
iation, which started from scratch last 
year, now has fifteen members. This as- 
sociation has Scotty McClure, Jack Bruner, 
Roy Moore, Gene Lowe, Roy Bowling and 
Earl Hill certified by the K.H.S.A.A. 
Coach Gil Samples of London gets the 
credit for organizing the London Officials 
Association. 

The last news item Briscoe sends is 
confusing. Apparently he is attempting to 
tell us that his secretary is a bird hunter, 
because he says, "Excuse my typing. My 
secretary is away looking for the stork." 

Here's a Happy New Year resolution for 
you: Send the history of the physically- 
handicapped kid you are helping to The 
Flying Dutchman, Colonial Manor, Jeffer- 
sontown. 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky College of Education. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscriptions service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
visual Materials. 

Swimming 

BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Throuigii scenes photographed both above and 
beneath the surface of the water, basic techniques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land and 
water drills involving kicking, breathing, floating, 
paddling and stroking and pulling with fche arm are 
practiced separately, then coordinated as the swim- 
mer learns the American crawl. The back float, 
back stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated 
and explained. 

BREAST STROKE. SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, $1.50 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 
CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented 
in this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the 
breaithing are demonstrated. This film also includes 
slow moition shots under water. 
DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonsitrated: 
The hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, 
propar arm action, correct way of landing on the 
feet, proper takeoff and lift, correct entry into the 
water. The backward dive is also taught, including 
lift, arching the body, and entry into the waiter. 
The motion is stopped at varioois points to enable 
detailed studv of form. 
DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera 
and carefully devised teaching demonstrations in- 
troduce the new swimming technique known as the 
dolphin or fish-tail kick. Analyzing the body move- 
ments used in the dolphin kick, the film stresses 
the importance of practice for mastery of this 
efficient speedy kick. 

I'M NO FOOL IN WATER, p-e-j-a, 1 reel (8 min.) 
color, $3.00 

Jiminy Cricket illustrates the "rfo's" and "don'ts" 
of water safety precautions. Points out the basic 
rules: wait at least two hours after eating, stay out 
when water is too cold, never swim alone, and dive 
only when you know the water is deep enough. 
SWTM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the Anmv Air Force at Miami are taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burn- 
ing oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruc- 
tion and for safety classes as well as for general 
programs. 

SPRINGBOARD TECHNIQUES (The Forward and 
Backward Lifts), j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 man.), 
$1.50 

Skillful diving requires proper use of the spring- 
board, and here we see safe and skillful practice 
over the sand pit and at the pool. Shows methods of 
acquiring correct springboard technique and demon- 
strates auiproach, flight, and entry of pike, tuck, and 
somersault dives. 

Baseball 
BASCEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, .$75 

The All-star Game of 1956 was played in Grif- 
fith Stadium at Washington. Stars of the American 
and National League are pictured in action during 
iflie pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are 
shown as the National League wins by a score of 
7-3. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $.75 

Twenty-five all stars from the American League 
defeat an equal numiber of National League greats 
by a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close ups of the 
baseball sitars of today and interesting plays of the 
game are shown in the film (KHSAA) 
BASEBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$.75 

In this film a colorful Big League Manager and 
an outstanding student of the game narrates play 
situations covering the official interpretation of a 
panorama of basic rules involving batting, pitching, 
base running, and fieldiing. It is recommended for 
use by officials, coaches, players and fans. 
BASEBALL HALL OF FAME, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
color, $.75 

This film shows the annual meeting at Coopers- 
town, New York, When new names are added to the 
Hall of Fame list. Numerous stars of the past re- 
turn to the shrine each year at this time and are 
shown as their feats on the diamond are related. 
The history of Coooerstown and the purpose of the 
Hall of Fame are explained in the picture. 
BATTER UP, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (22 Min.) color, $.75 

Produced by National and American Leagues of 
Baseball. Shows the proper techniques of batting as 
demonstrated by hitting stars of the majors, Stan 
Musiial, Ted Williams, Mickey Mantle, Ernie Banks, 
Willie Mays and others. 
BATTING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, 
stance, grip, stride, swing and follow-through are 
clearly demonstrated in this film by professional 
players. 

THE BATTING STARS OF BASEBALL, s-c-a, 3 
reels, $1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and wihat 
makes them good?Waibch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 

CATCHING IN BASBBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
The basic skills in catching baseball are pre- 
sented in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, 
a batted ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are 
shown. Stance, footwork, and body balance are 
described. Slow motion and close-up photography 
are used to enable the viewer to follow each step or 
movement in each of the basic skills. 
CATCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$.75 
This is a fMm designed to assist in the coaching 
of catchers but it is also interesting and entertain- 
ing Correct methods and techniques of receiving, 
throwing, signaling and fielding are illustrated by 
Bill Dickey, Sherman LoUar, Yogi Berra and Roy 
Campanplla. 

DEMOCRACY OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$.75 
The purpose of this flim is for further develop- 
ment of young baseball players in our modem de- 
mocracy and illustrates this through sports and 
spopts competition. This film includes a brief history 
of baseball along with a cavalcade of past and pre- 

I>OUBLE-PLAY KINGS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 
1 reel, $1.50 
This film presents an analysis of the double play 
in baseball. Different players from several major 
leagues are shown in action. Fi-'l'iing, tagging, and 
thrnw''n5r are illustrated and explained. 
HITTING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 



Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow accurately and graphically the basic funda- 
mentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, 
legs, hips, shoulders, arm, and head is explained. 
How to select a bat, how to hold it, and correct bat- 
ting position are shown. 

INFIELD PLAY AT 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$.75 

The fundamentals and finer points of infield 
play at first and third base are illustrated by big 
league players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging 
runners, etc., pictured, often in slow motion. Spon- 
sored by A. G. Spalding Co., The American and 
National Leagues. 
INSIDE BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 , 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, 
batting, fielding, and base-running, are demonstrat- 
ed. Note: This film was placed with library through 
the courtesy of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association. 
OFFICIAL BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 

Informative and entertaining play situations used 
to depict official rules interpretations covering the 
phases of batting, pitching, base running, fielding 
and umpiring. Stin-ulates interest and knowledge 
for fans, players, officials and baseball administra- 
tors. 

PITCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, $.75 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. 
Types of pitches and methods of practice are por- 
trayed. 

PLAY BALL SON, j-s, IVe reels, $2.50 

Joe Croniin introduces this film showing a group 
of foxirteen-year-old boys who are experts in base- 
ball. Correct method of hitting, catching, and throw- 
ing are demonsitrated in natural and slow motion. 
Based on book by Bert V. Dunne. 
STRIKE THREE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, $.75 

Designed to train pitchers. The greatest pitchers 
in the game today show the pitching and fielding 
finesse that brought them fame. 
THROWING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throw- 
ing in baseball. Instructions are given for the over- 
throws. Coordinaition of foot and arm motion is 
head, three-quarter side, side, and underhand 
stressed, as well as coordination of the body as a 
whole. 
TOUCHING ALL BASES, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters base- 
ball by showing various American League stars 
playing their positions. It is also intended to give 
fans as a whole a better understanding and know- 
ledige of the national pastime. The film shows 
Fatii'r Flanagan and his Boys Town Team, the Hall 
of Fame ceremonies in Cooperstown, New York, 
and scenes from night baseball games. 
THE UMPTRE IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpire to the 
baseball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire 
and also qualifications for job, showing where they 
receive their training. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels. $.75 

Highlights of the game between the Cleveland 
Indians and the New York Giants are shown in this 
film. Tho Giants, sparked bv the sensational hitting 
of Rhodos, defeated the Indians in four straight 
games. The Indians had set a record for the number 
of games won in winning the American League 
Pennant. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1955, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, 
$.75 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



Page Thirteen 



WAGGENER— CLASS AAA FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: B. Riley, M. Rodgers, L. Metcalf. M. Karem. G. MoGanghey. B. Boone. G. 
Barrows, H. Morris, L. Ethridge, D. Jones. Second Row: T. DeMnnbrun, R. Gatj, M. Barke. T. Kuch. J. 
Bloyd. D. Taft, M. Mowry. W. Oyler, D. Weller, D. Freeman. Third Row: L. Crouch, P. Mapother, T. 
Bradley, C. Pike. R. Smith, M. EasUy, P. Coombs, C. Wood, L. Squires, W. Borsch. Fourth Row: D. 
Fleckenstein, R. Eigeibach, M. Mon^mery, D. Everett, J. Gering, G. George, R. Webb, B. Gatj, R. 
McGuire, R. Lagatella. Fifth Row: Mgr. B. Karem, Mgr. F. Shuck, Mgr. B. Edwards, Ass't Coach R. 
Hoppc, Head Coach M. Dcim, Ass't Coach E. Minton, Mgr. B. Tyler, Mgr. R. Tyler, Mgr. B. Casey. 



Exciting moments of the seven games between 
the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees 
are shown in this film. The commentary leading up 
to each game makes the film interesting as the 
Dodgers win the world championship. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

The American League champion New York Yank- 
ees, carry the series the full seven games before 
bowing to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the 
National League. The film catches most of the hit- 
ting and shows the plays in which runs were scored 
in each game. The narrator. Lew Fonseca, describes 
the play and fills in the background with interest- 
ing bits of information concerning the game. 
WORLD SERIES OF 1959, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, 
$.75 

The highlights of the six games played in the 
series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the 
Chicago White Sox are shown in this film. The 
Dodgers won the series by defeating the White 
Sox four games to two. Most of the scoring plays 
are filmed, along with many of the outstanding 
defensive plays. The color that goes with these 
games is capitured in the film. 

WiORLD SERIES OF 1960, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 
Man.), color, $.75 

New York Yankees of the American League 
carried the series its full seven games before bow- 
ing to National League Pittsburg Hues. Highlights 
of all seven games are shown and the action des- 
cribed. 

WORLD SJBRIBS OF 1961, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 
min.), color, $.75 

Narrated by Mel Alien, this film shows the Cin- 
cinnati Reds were able to win only the second game 
in the series against the New York Yankees. Su- 
perb pitching of Whitey Ford and batting power of 
the Yankees brought them the world's championship 
after five games. 

WORLD SERiIiEiS OF 1962, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, 
$.75 

Key plays from all seven games are shown as 
the New York Yankees of the American League re- 
tian the world's cbampionship by defeating the San 
Francisco Giants by the score of 1-0 in the final 
game. 



Golf 

SAVING STROKES WITH SAM SNEAD, s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
Golf ohamipion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, 
his stance, his swing on ©aah of several types of 
golf situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots help 
to clarify the instruction. Shots and driver, brassie, 
and various irons for difficult lies are illustrated 
and finally bis putting technique is shown. 

Tennis 
ADVANCED TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil. Bill Tilden 
narrates and demonstrates, showing advanced tech- 
nicfues of tennis. 

BEGINNUSTG TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 1/2 reels, (14 min.), 
$2.50 

Shows how the tennis instructor teaches tennis 
to beginning and advanced students. Includes an 
analysis of the basic fundamentals of tennis-serv- 
ing, forehand and backhand drive, forehand and 
baddiand volley, and the smash. Shows actual play 
situations in which these fundamentals are em- 
phasized, and also includes individual demonstration 
and analysis. 

Track 
THE BROAD JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed^iming and coordination — de- 
velopment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
hips, one, two, three style — footroll — single and 
triple air stride — soft versus hard take odEf — arm 
position. 
DISCUS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle develop- 
ment for side arm throw — grips — ^finger roll — heel 
of thinnb pressure — finger exercises — clockwise 
spin — ^hip snap — reverse and non-reverse styles. 
DISTANCE RACES, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1.000 to 10.000 meters and steeple- 
chase are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is 
contrasted with that of dash man. Difference in 
typical physiques are shown. Slow motion photo- 
graphy is used to analyze movements. 
DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoid- 
ing shin splint— controlled tension — forward knee 
reflex — straight line running — automatic stride. 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



SOUTHERN— CLASS AAA, REGION 2, DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Herbert Johnson. Ronald Geary. Pat McGinnis, Mike Vaugh, Bruce Toebbe, 
Steve Austin. Glenn Hale. Tony Stefater. Joe Jackson. S^rond Row : George Colbert. William Videtto, 
Randy Keisker. David Rosser, Jack Bowman, Gary Rapp, Batch Bozarth, Duray Hale, Jim Stallings. Earl 
Co.bert. Third Row: Guy Emmons. Don Feard. Clyde Hayes. Fred Montfort. John Daugherty. Dennis 
Fredericks, Mike Schnler, Lindsey Cooper. Mike Osborne, Bob Bohannon. 



THE HIGH JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $L50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western 
style — body lean and reverse — aipproach — body ten- 
sion — coordination of arm and leg aobion. 
THE HURDLES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action^ — 
rhythmic runnmg — hurdling, calisthenics— body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — eircular stepover aation — 
adapting styles of physiques. 
THE JAVEUN, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and 
reverse — alternative hand and finger grips — facing 
position — ^balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
sion — throwing angle — ^body and leg coorddnation 
drills — flexibility exercises. 
JUMPS AND POLE VAULT, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are 
shown for running high- jump; running broad- jump; 
hop, step and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion 
photogrraphy is us"d for detailed study of form. 
MIDDLE DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — pendulum and bicycle sta-ide — exercise 
— counter balanced arm action — push drive — jockey- 
ing for position. 
POLE VAULT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercis- 
es — ^runniing action — grip — selecting the pole — ^take- 
off — Wesitem and Eastern style — slotting — ^novice 
training. 
THE RELAYS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — ^visual pass — ^blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — baton grips 
— relay starts, underlhand action — cup style — OTer- 
hand sprint pass^^y scoop — ■practice and team 
work. 
THE SPRINTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dasih- 
impaot style and naitural stretch stride-syndironiz- 
ing leg and arm action-conditioning exercises-start- 
ing techniques-slow motion of muscular utilization 
and coordination. 
SHOT- PTTT, i-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting styles to physiques — tension control — 
one, two, three rhythm — exercises — finger and hand 
grip — finger and wrist snap — foot positions — pro- 
gressive tension and effort — explosive hip snap. 
(Continued On Page Nineteen) 



All-Conference Teams 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Offensive Team : 

Ends: Wood, Park City; Jackson, Austin-Tracy. 
Guards: Moibley, Cavema; Steen, Gamaliel. 
Center: Burks, Caverna 

Backs: Berry, Austin-Tracy; Basil, Park City; 
Wilson, Hiseville. 

Defensive Team : 

Ends: Whitlow, Austin-Tracy; Matthews, Hise- 
ville. 

Guards: Peterson, Cavema; Steen, Gamaliel. 
Linebackers: Logsdon, Caverna; Wood, Park 
City. 

Halfbacks: Eaton, Temple Hill; Gillenwater, 
Gamaliel. 

Big Eight Conference 
Ehids: Barber, Daviess County; Farmer, Hender- 
son; Vanmeter, Owensboro Catholic; Watkins, 
Owensboro. 

Tackles: Brown, Morganfield; Chapman, Stiir- 
gis; Evans, Owensboro; Franks, Henderson 
County. 

Guards: Blakeley, Sturgis; Childre, Henderson 
County; Hopper, Henderson County; Tooley, 
Owensboro. 

Centers: Bray, Daviess County; Kassinger, 
Owensboro. 

Quarterbacks: Baird, Daviess County; Holliday, 
Henderson County. 

Halfbacks: Chambers, Owensboro; Hicks, Hen- 
derson; Martin, Owensboro Caitholic; Powers, 
Daviess County. 

FHillbacks: Helton, Daviess County; Moore, 
Owensboro. 

Central Kentucky Conference 
Ends: Neal, Henry Clay; Sanders, Danville; 
Clark, Paris; Wright, Aaderson. 
Tackles: Huffman, Woodford County; Sweat, 
Madison; Lance, Harrodsburg; Thomas, Lan- 
caster; Foster, Paris. 

Guards: Welch, Jessamine County; Young, Stan- 
ford; Lancaster, Danville; Copeland, Henry 
Clay. 

Centers: Harrod, Jessamine County; Carr, Paris. 
Quarterbacks: Carey, Harrodsburg; Million, 
Woodford County. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



Page Fifteen 



OLD KENTUCKY HOME— CLASS A, REGION 2, DISTRICT I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Roger Ewing, Herbert Phelps, Jack Foster, Hark Parrish, Glen Downs, 
Benny Price. Eddie Keeling, Bobby Spalding, Charles Sidbottom. Second Row : Ronnie Florence, Jerry 
Stone, Keith Sorrcll, Ronnie Stone. Larry Keeling, Charles Heilard, William Sympson, Danny Bradley, 
Bobby Atwood. Bobby Caslin. Third Row: Woody Cheek, Charles Bowman, William Bradley, Eugene Sor- 
rell, Bruce King, William Welch, Kenneth Gordon, William Beam, James Beam. 



Fullbacks: Jones, Jessamine County; Harrell, 

Henry Clay. 

Halfbacks: Markhara, Paris; Strode, Henry 

Clay; Morton, Shelbyville; Long, Lancaster. 
Cumberland Valley Conference 
Offensive Team: 

Ends: Cohelia, Evarts; Bradford, Wallins. 

Tackles: Nails, Loyall; McKnight, Cumberland. 

Guards: Meeks, Evarts; Hagey, East Main. 

Center: Chapman, Loyall. 

Backs: Granato, Cumberland; Flannary, East 

Main; Dizney, Hall; Carmical, Wallins. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Hoskins, Hall, Co'helia, Evarts. 

Tackles: Hagey, East Main; Nails, Loyall. 

Guards: Steins, Loyall. 

Linebackers: Granato, Cumberland; Flannary, 

East Main; Dizney, Hall; Bradley, Loyall. 

Halfbacks: Jackson, East Main; Woods, East 

Main. 
Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Blair, Jenkins; PotJter, Elkhoi-n City. 

Tackles: Runyon, Pikeville; Eppling, Elkhorn 

City. 

Center: Dotson, Belfry. 

Guards: Hall, Whitesburg; Hall, Jenkins. 

Backs: Collins, Jenkins; Brooks, Elkhom City; 

Greene, Hazard; Greer, Jenkins. 

Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Haekett, Ft. Knox; Marsh, Shepherdsville, 

Enman, Elizabebhtown. 

Tackles: Moore, Elizabethtown, Gordon, Old 

Kentuoky Home; Settle, Bardstown. 

Guards: Beeler, Ft. Knox; Hastings, Shepherds- 
ville; Bevins, St. Joseph. 

Center: Mace, Elizabethtown. 

Halfbacks: Bryant, Shepherdsville; Maffett, 

Elizabethtown. 

Fullback: Phelps, OM Kentucky Home. 
Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 
Oififensive Team: 

Munn, Samons, and Wright of McKell; Stout, 

Castle and Dean of Russell; Kirk and Vaughn 

of Boyd County; Colvin, Raceland; Rose, 



Louisa; Witten, Wurtland. 
Defensiive Team: 

Harr, Stone and Nickel of McKell; Welks, Bil- 
low and Fanner of Russell; Settles and Rose of 
Boyd County; MoCauley, Raceland; Johnson, 
Louisa; Maddox, Wurtland. 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Sargent, Holmes; Rotjh, Highlands; 
ghetler, Dixie Heights; Sandfoss, Campbell 
County. 

Tackles: Kyle, Highlands; Warton, Dixie 
Heighlts; Bowers, Campbell County; Eaton, Lud- 
low. 

Guards: Wolfe, Campbell County; Loomis, Hol- 
mes; Brown, Dayton; Tongret, Boone County. 
Centers: Zint, Highlands; Voelker, Dixie 
Heights. 

Halfbacks: Feldhaus, Ludlow; Sehreiber, Dixie 
Heig'hlts; Ferguson, Dayiton; Biltz, Highlands. 
Fullbacks: Nelson, Boone County; Lawson, High- 
lands. 

Quarterbacks: Birkley, Highlands; Malone, Lud- 
low. 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Cummins, Pineville; Brown, London. 

Tackles: Burton, Corbin; Smith, Pineville. 

Guards: Adams, Corbin; Smith, Middlesboro. 

Center: Baker, Pineville. 

Backs: Cowan, Corbin; Turner and Selvey of 

Harlan; Brooks, Pineville; Barnes, Middlesboro. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Rose, Corbin; Brown, London. 

Tackles: Burton, Corbin; Christian, Harlan. 

Guards: Baker, Pineville; Adams, Corbin. 

Linebackers: Brown, Pineville; Carroll, Harlanj 

Hammons, Knox Central. 

Backs: Griffin, Pineville. 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Hunter, Franklin-Simpson; Trevathan, 
Tilghman; Champion, Crittenden County; Ran- 
dolph, Hopldnsviile. 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1%4 



LONDON— CLASS A, REGION 4, DISTRiCT I, CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Dave Brown, Barry Heuser, Bill Dalton, i.arry ..ouchens. Jii 
Robert Messer, Harold Robinson. Jim Messer, Bill Baldwin, Charles Evans. Ted S'ominski. Phil Lowry. 
Tom Larkey. Second Row: Jim Davis. G. J. Hunt. Charles Barr, Ed Jones. Bob Waldroff. Tom Blunchi. 
Dale Brown. Ken Deaton. Robert Lorman, Wayne Hale. Richard Riley, Wayne Bennett, Head Coach Dave 
Fryrear. Third Row: Ass't Coach Richard Morgan, Mike Meadows, Bob Davis, Tony Brown, David Van- 
Leaven, Don Houchens, Tom Harkleroad, Ronnie Minnix, Holbert Hodges, Gary Miiler, Dexter Vaughn, 
Eddie Brown. Roger Miller. Ass't Coach Roy Woolum. Fourth Row: Mgr. Bill Isgrigg, Mgr. Vernoi> 
Harkleroad, Steve Gray. 



Tackles: Atwood, Caldwell County; McBallister, 

Fulton; Tarpley, Franklin-Simpson; Price, Hop- 

kinsville. 

Guards: Curling, Caldwell County; Mabry, Hop- 

kinsville; Oaklet, Trigg County; Crawford, 

Franklin-Simpson, 

Centers: Rose, Murray; Housman, Mayfield. 

Quarterbacks: Beasles, Fulton; Irl Stevens, 

Caldwell County. 

Halfbacks: Covingiton, Hopkinsville; Faughn, 

Murray; Flippen, Russellville ; Veatch, Tilghman. 

Fullbacks: Gianini, Caldwell County; Hopper, 

Crittenden County. 

BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
being charged with the foul. The player, knowing 
he is charged with the foul, has the responsibility 
of raising his hand, without being asked to do so 
by the officdal. 

10. Play: Dribbler Al charges Bl. After the in- 
fraction has been indicated, B2 commits a technical 
foul. 

Ruling: False double foul. Bl is not given a 
free tlirow. Team A is awarded a free throw for 
the technical foul committed by B2. The ball is 
tossed at center after the attempt w'hioh results 
from the technical foul. 

11. Play: Dribbler Al in his (a) front court; 
or (b) back court charges Bl. 

Ruling: Al is charged with a personal foul but 
no free throw is given Bl. In both (a) and (b), 
the official musit hand the ball to the player of 
the offended team who will make the throw-in 
from the out of bounds spot indicated by the of- 
ficial, which will be nearest to where the foul oc- 
curred. 

12. Play: Player of team A enters the game 
wearing the same number as a teammate who is 
in the game. 

Ruling: Technical foul is charged to team A. 
Two players of the same team may not wear 
identical numb?rs. The referee is auithorized to 
order a number chanee for the incoming player. 

13. Play: Is an official required to hand the ball 
to the play who will make a throw-in at mid-court 
following a technical foul? 



Ruling: Yes. 

14. Play: Substitute A6 reports to the scorer. 
Ball next becomes nead because of a: (a) held ball; 
or (b) foul; or (c) successful free thi-ow; or (d) 
ball going out of bounds; or (e) double dribble; 
or (f) field goal. Should substitute be beckoned? 

Rulling: Yes for (a), (b), (c), (d) and (e). In 
(f), A6 may not enter unless the clock has been 
stopp'ad foT a time-out or some other reason. If 
the dock has been stopped, A6 should be beckoned. 
If A6 should be erroneously beckoned in (f), he may 
parlticipate. 

15. Play: Al holds the ball near the sideline. 
Bl is guarding him so that contact ensues and 
Al loses his balance and steps on a boundary. 

Ruling: The official must decide whether the 
action results in a foul or a violation. Under no 
circumsltances will Al be awarded the ball out of 
bounds for a throw-in. 

16. Play: At apiproximately the same time as Al 
passes to A2, Al changes Bl. The official is rea- 
sonably doubtful that Al was in control at the 
time he fouled Bl. 

Rulling: Player control foul. The interpretation 
provides that if there is any doubt as to w"hether 
there is player control by a member of his team 
during the time he or a teammate commits a foul, 
it shall be ruled as a player control foul. 

17. Play: It is discovered that Al who is in the 
game: (a) changed his nun^ber without reporting 
the (Change to an official; or (b) is participating 
after having been disqualified. 

Ruling: Technical foul for both (a) and (b) with 
'two free throws awarded Team B. A2 is disqualified 
from further paritiicipation in both situations. 

18. Play: Al requests a time-out for the pur- 
pose of: (a) tying a shoelace; or (b) replacing 
a low-cut shoe; or (c) recovering or replacing 
eyeglasses; or (d) recovering or replacing contact 
lenses. 

Ruling: The official should grant the request 
in (a), (b), (c) and (d). The ti'-ne-out is charged 
in (a) and (b). In (c) and (d), the time-out is not 
charged, and in both (c) and (d), effort should be 
made to recover and replace the lens and/or glasses 
as soon as possible, and then resume play im- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUABY, 1964 



Page Seventeen 



MURRAY— CLASS A, REGION I, DISTRICT I. CHAMPION 




(Left to Right 

Jimmie Joh: 

Danny Nix, 

Ryan. Steve Doran, S; 

Fourth Row: Ail( 



ront Row: Ronnie Danner, Don Lee, Bud Nail. 11a 
raig Banks. Don Faughan. Second Row: Bernard Ha 
Valentine, Mike Manning, Bill Adams, Nick Terhun 

Knight, Mike Kuykendlal, Ray Parmelee, Johnny Nutter, Ralph Jackson, 
gham, John Saramons, Steve Trevathan, John Bennett, Phil Barber, Eddie 



■y Weatherly, He 
ey, Johnny Rose 
Third Row: 



1 Hogancamp, 
Steve Sexton, 
t. Larry- 



West, Jerome Brandon, David Manning. Fifth Row : Charlie Warren, Charley Perry, Jimmie Wilkins, 
Bobby Herndon, Otis Jones, Orlo Sprunger, Jimmy Musgrove, Don Blalock. Sixth Row : Tony Thomas, 
Steve West, Jerry Caldwell, Bobby Emerson, Dick Sims, Jerry Wahl. Seventh Row: Coach Preston Holland, 
Ass't Coach W. P. Russell, Ass't Coach Jerry Shelton, Ass't Coach Larry Henson, Ass't Coach Johnny 
Carlisle. 



mediately. Team A, of coiirse, has the privilege of 
taking the full time-out in (a) and (b) and vi^heither 
they do or not has no bearing on the fact the 
time-oot is charged. 

19. Play: Al is being closely guarded by Bl 
when: (a) A2 assumes and maintains a position 
betiwe.en Al and Bl; or (b) A2 slides beitween Al 
and Bl but does not sitop or assume a position be- 
tween them. Should a held ball be called after 5 
seconds? 

Ruling: Not in (a). When A2 takes a position 
between Al and Bl, Al 4s no longer being closely 
guarded by Bl. Therefore, the 5 seconds count will 
cease when A2 assuones this position. In (b), the 
counit oonbinues and a held ball shall be called after 
5 seconds. 

20. Play: During second free throw by Al, A2 
tips the ball in the basket while it is on the ring. 

Ruling: Violation. Basket interference. Violation 
causes ball to become dead and no point is scored. 
Ball is awarded to team B out of bounds on the 
side ait either end of the free throw line extended. 

21. Play: During the firsit attempt by Al of a 
2 free throw award, B2 does not occupy 3rd lane 
space. A3 takes it. Before the ball is handed to Al 
for his second attempt, B2 requests permission to 
occupy 3rd space. 

Ruling: Grant request of B2. 

22. Play: Following a traveling violation by team 
A and While: (a) the ball is being given to the 
official; or (b) the official is handing the ball to 
Bl; or (c) Bl is preparing to make the throw-in, 
team A requests a time-out. 

Ruling: Time-out is granted in (a), (b), and (c), 
except that, in (c), the official will not granrt the 
time-out if 4 seconds have already been consumed 
by Bl in attempting to make the throw-in. After 



4 seconds of throw-in time have been consumed, a 
change of status of the ball is considered to be 
inuninent and a time-out request is, therefore, 
denied. 

23. Play: Al, in the front court, holds the ball 
and is surrounded by four teammates. No B player 
is within guarding distance. Shound a held ball be 
acUed after 5 seconds? 

Ruling: Yes, as provided by 4-101'(c). The pur- 
pose of the maneuver by team A is obviously to 
prevent the opponents from getting at the ball 
without making contact. 

24. Play: Al is injured and referee stops the 
clock. At the end of one minute, A6 replaces Al and, 
at the same time, A7 and A8 replace A2 and A3. 

Ruling: No time-out is charged to team A be- 
cause injured Al was replaced before 1% minutes 
expired. Since the clock was stopped and the ball 
was dead, it was permissiible for A7 and A8 to re- 
place A2 and A3, respecitively. 

25. Play: Bl commits a violation for basket 
intenferenice at A's basket: (a) during a field goal 
try; or ('b) during a free throw which has touched 
the basket ring. 

Ruling: In (a), the violation stops the clock and 
team A is awarded two points. In (b), team A is 
awarded 1 point. In both (a) and (b), after award- 
ing proper numiber of points, the official shall hand 
the ball, as is required after any violation, to a 
player of the scored upon team, who is behind the 
end line. 

26. Play: Al is dribbling near the end of the 
court, when Bl quickly takes a legal position in his 
path. Al, who is inbounds, loses ■ control of the ball 
in attempiting to avoid Bl. His momentum carries 
him out of bounds. In attempiting to steal the ball, 
Bl also goes out of bounds. Al regains his balance 



Page Eighteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



and returns to the court before Bl recovers. Al 
then continues his dribble. 

Ruling: Violation. Double dribble. Dribble ended 
when Al lost control. Since Bl did not touch the 
ball, Al cound not dribble again. Al could have 
recovered the ball without violating. There is no 
penalty for Al or Bl inadvertently leaving tihe 
court and then returning in a situation such as 
this. 

27. Play: Bl holds Al, while Al is attempting to 
throw the ball into A's basket. Al continues his at- 
tempt and, before the ball is released, time for the 
period expires. 

Ruling: Because time expired before the ball left 
the hands oif Al, the goal would not count even 
though the ball enters the basket. 2 free throws 
are awarded Al because he was fouled in the act 
of atempting a goal and because the attempt did 
not score. This ruling, is on the assumption that 
Al was fouled before time expired. 

28. Play: The ball is placed at the disposal of 
Al who has been awarded a free throw. Al, who 
is at the free throw line, has the ball and is 
making preparations for a free throw attempt. 
A2 pushes Bl along the lane. 

Ruling: Intentional foul by A2. Bl is awarded 2 
free throws after which the ball will be put in 
play by center jump. 

Comment: This situation is inteipreted to be an 
intentional foul, in order to prevent team A from 
ex,ploitirg the rule. By committing a personal con- 
trol foul, A2 causes it to be a false double foul 
resulting in a center jump, thereby depriving team 
B of the opportunity of a throw-in if the free throw 
by Al were successful, or depriving team B of an 
opportunity to secure the ball if tihe free throw at- 
tempt by Al were missed. But when the foul by 
A2 is intentional, team B is given 2 free throws, 
whi'ch makes the infraction by team A cosily. 

29. Play: Team B is three points behind late in 
the game. Bl misses a field goal try. A2 secures 
the rebound and is in his back court advancing the 
tall when B2 holds A2. The foul by B2 is not violent 
nor savage, but it is repeated several times duriing 
the last minutes of the game. 

Ruling: Cn the basis of the description of the 
situation, these are intentional personal fouls which 
call for a penalty of 2 free throws for each foul. 

30. Play: Al is out of bounds to make a throw- 
in and Bl uses unsportsmanlike language and is 
assessed a technical foul. After a member of team 
A has attempted the free throw and jusit before 
ball has been handed to A2 for the throw-in from 
out of bounds at mid-court, B2 flagrantly pushes A2 
to the floor and is assessed a flagrant technical 
foul. 

Ruling: B2 is disqiialified and team A is awarded 
2 free throws. After any team A player (or players) 
■has atten"pted the free throws, the ball is awarded 
to team A out of bounds at mid-court for throw-in. 

Comment. After a double foul or afte,r the last 
free throw following a false double foul, the ball 
is put in play in the center circle by a jump be- 
tween any two opponents. This is not the procedure 
following the last free throw of a multiple foul or 
a false mutliple foul. The above play situation is a 
false multiple foul. Most often, a false mulbipJe foul 
consists of a personal foul and a technical foul, both 
of whidVi are committed bv o"e team against the 
other. However, a false multiple foul may consist 
of two technical fouls committed by one team 
againsit the other. 

31. Play: Al, throwing in from out of bounds, 
throws the ball through his basket. 



Ruling Violation. Team B is awarded tihe ball 
for a throw-m from out of bounds at either end 
of that free throw line extended nearer the goal 
through which the ball was thrown. 

32. Play: Ball, in front court, is being held by 
Al when Bl bats it from his hand after which A2 
touches the ball in the front court and the ball 
then crosses the division line into A's back court 
where A2 recovers. 

Ruling: Violation. A2 was the last to touch the 
ball in his front court before it crossed the division 
line. Technically the ball was in possession of team 
A at the time A2 touched it. 

33. Play: As A2 throws the ball at B's basket, 
Bl fouls him. 

Ruling: This is not a field goal try. Therefore, 
the ball becomes dead when the foul is committed. 
If the foul is committed before the ball goes in the 
basket, the baskeit will not count. Regardless of 
whether the ball goes in the basket, A2 is awarded 
1 free throw or a 1 plus 1, as the case may be. 
A2 has not been fouled during a try. 

34. Play: While the two teams are warming up 
5 minutes before game time, Al and Bl trade 
punches at mid-court. 

Ruling: Officials' jurisdiction in such a situation 
does not begin until the ball is tossed at center to 
stant the game. This is a matter for the school 
authorities to adjudicate. Acceptable procedure 
would be to bar both players from participating in 
the game, but such, or any other decision, is not 
within the jurisdiction of the game officials. 

35. Play: Al has the ball out of bounds for a 
throw-in. A2, A3 and A4 immediately set up a 
screen by moving close together and parallel to the 
boundary line where the throw-in is to be made. 
The screen is set up at a disitance of: (a) 3 feet 
or more from the boundary, which is being used 
for t^e throw-in; or (b) less than 3 feet from this 
boundary. 

Ruling: The screen is legal in (a). In (b) any 
opponent of the screener may reauest and take a 
position between two of the A p'ayers. The screen- 
ing players are obliged to permit tihe B player to 
take this position. 

36. Play: Score at conclusion of regulation play- 
ing time is, team A 50 — t°am B 49. Clearly after 
the 4th quarter has ended, but before the referee 
has apiiroved score to terminate officials' jurisdic- 
tion. Al commits a flagrant technical foul. 

Ruling: Team B is immediately g:v°n 2 free 
throws. Tf both are successful, score is team A 50 
— team B 51, and gaiie is o^'er. If only one is 
successful, score is tied and game is continued with 
one or more extra periods after a one-minute inter- 
mission. Extra period is started with a center jump. 

37. Play: Al is apparently injured and clock is 
stopTied. His coach examines hip^. A6 reports for 
Al and replaces Al, who leaves tihe court. Al then 
immediately reports to scorer and re-enters game 
before the ball becomes alive. 

Ruling: As this was not a charged time-out, 
play should be resumed as soon as the iniured 
player is removed from the game. Ho'wever, if Al 
return before nlay is resumed, team A is charged 
with a time-ouit. 

38. Play: Jump ball is ca,lled. Designated jumper 
Al stops to tie a shoelace before assuming his posi- 
tion. 

Ruling: Since clock is already stopped, the mat- 
ter of stopping the clock is not involved. Official 
.should ask Al if he desires a time-out. If he does 
not. off'c^al should order Al to enter jump circle 
immediately. If delay results in giving team A an 
advantage, or in placing opponents at a disadvant- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



Page Nineteen 



age, official may call a technical foul for delay. 

39. Play: Official discovers disqualified Al has 
returned to the line-up, or Al has changed his 
playing number without reporting to scorer and an 
official. Discovery is; (a) during time-out charged 
to either team; or (b) immediately after end of 
4th period and score is A 4.5 — B 40; or (c) after 
4th period has ended in a tied score. 

Ruling: In (b), there is no technical foul. In (a), 
Al is considered to be "participaiting" even though 
time is out at the time. In (c), since an extra 
period is to follow, Al is considered as "participat- 
ing". Technical foul in (a) and (c). Since foul is 
flagrant, two free throws are awarded. 

40. Play: While ball is in flight on a field goal 
try by Al: (a) A2 excessively swings his arms and 
elbows without making contact; or (b) A2 swings 
elbows and contacts Bl. Ball goes through A's 
basket. 

Rixling: (a) Violation by A2 causes ball to be- 
come dead immediately. Field goal is not scored. 
(b) Foul by A2 does not immediately kill the ball. 
Goal is counted. 



FILMS 

(Continued from Page Fourteen) 

Gymnastics 

GYMNASTICS, PART I, j-s-c-a, IVa reels (17 min.), 
$2.50 
Introduces the basic principles of gymnastics 
and follows the routines developed by polished per- 
formers on the parallel bars, the rope climb, and 
the long horse. Attention is given to the rolls, 
handstands, and handsprings, twists, and somer- 
saults that are basic to tumbling. (Hoefler) 

GYMNASITOS, PART II, j-s-c-a, IV2 reels (17 
min.), $2.50 
Introduces the gymnast to the fundamentals of 
free exercise routines. Stresses the importance of 
smooth action as well as strength, form, balance, 
and ability to develop difficult routines. Demon- 
strates rings, side horse, and the high bar. (Hoefler) 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is tile Iiome phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Atkiniion, Gerry, Route No. 2, Carlisle, 247-2346 

Baker, Billy, 422 Monticello, Somerset, 679-1111 

Ball, John C, P. O. Box 96, Oil Springs, 297-3202, 349-3044 

Balser, James L., 431 Peach Orchard, Pikeville, 7-4619, 7-7323 

Bienick, Stan, 11702 Harden Court, Cincinnati 40. Ohio 

Bishop, Heulyn, 225 Kenwood Blvd., Russell, 836-5906, 836-3531 

Blevins, Robert Lee, 3001/, Scott Ave., Pikeville, 432-2636, 437- 

7338 
Bradley. Merlin, Gordon 

Brock, John H., 611 Virginia Ave., Pineville, 7-2453 
Browder, Homer Lee, 127 Cottage Ave., Henderson, VA 6-2123, 

VA 7-1838 
Brown, John W., Lexington, 262-0954, 252-3212 
Brueck, Joe C, Jr., 2012 Wyandotte, Owensboro, MU 4-3791 
Brunson, Gary, 1314 Terrace, Evansville, Indiana, HA 3-2849 
Burdette, Wally M., 1514 Oleanda Ave., Louisville, EM 6-5559 
Burriii, John Francis, 14B Dixon Apt. Henderson 
Butler, Donald A., 2966 Chippewa Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-3175, 

MU 4-1451 
Carr, Billy W., Route No. 1, Franklin, JU 6-3923 
Carroll, Gene F., 1906 Millgate Road, Box 236, Anchorage, 425- 

4578 
Gathers, Bob, 509 17th St., Corbin, 1338 
Chandler, Roger. 113 Nora Ave., Shelbyville, ME 3-2259, ME 

3-2653 
Chaney, Rex, 304 Sun Street, Morehead, 784-5993, 784-4181 
Chattin, Charles, 2325 Harrod St., Ashland, 324-5385, 324-6464 
Claycomb, Eddie Hackley, 107 Brown, Glasgow, 651-3831 



Cochran, Floyd Edward, Box 30, Coal Run 

Coley, Kenneth, 118 Farley. Paducah. 4-6331 (Bus.) 

Collins, Jimmie Neil, Isom 

Collins, Owen David, Box 612, Jackson, 666-2872, 666-2775 

Conn, Jerry, Farmers 

Conrad, Ralph, Box 308, Falmouth, 654-3854 

Coyle, Ernest T., 8909 AristidtK Drive, Pleasure Ridge ParK, 

937-7005 
Crockett, Gerald, Route No. 2, Box 2%, Morehead 
Crook, Bill, 1000 South Main, Corbin, 3365, 3100 
Davis, Donald, 423 Ogden St., Somerset, 679-1527, 678-4516 
Delorme, David, Faulkner Hotel, Barbourville 
Dennison, James Edward, 1825 James David Court, Owensboro, 

MU 4-3602 
Dillon, James E., Route No. 1, Kermit, W. Va. 
Dixie, Cornelius, 608 South Clay, Louisville, 587-7680. 366-9561 
Downey, Jim, Ella Manal Court Apt. 34, Paducah, 443-7568, 

442-3000 
Dryden, Wallace Lee, 730 Cline, Frankfort, 223-1067, Lexington 

252-2200 ext. 2439 
Duncan, Earl S., 10,0007 Taylorsville Rd., Jeffcrsontown, AN 

7-1478, TW 5-0567 
Elmore, Jimmy A., 108 Central Ave., Leitchfield, 259-3555, 259- 

4175 
FlGher, Charles E., Jr., 524 Bellefonte Road, Flatwoods, 836- 

8686. 836-3141 ext 224 
Fiske, Charles, 604 Chestnut St., Berea, 986-3273 
Fox, Martin, 400 North 8th St., Box 54, Murray. 753-6214 
Frisby, J. R., 38 Main St., Paintsville, 789-5419 
Fryrear, David W., Hill St., London, VO 4-2798, VO 4-2181 
Green, Walter, Middlesboro 
Griffis, Estil Jr., 1705 Park St., Bowling Green, VI 2-1520 

VI 2-1520 
Grisham, Jesse R., 1527 Roosevelt, Henderson, VA 7-1035, 

VA 7-1940 
GuGtafson, Al, Jr., 248 Francis Bldg., Louisville. 587-8102, 584- 

7655 
Hamilton, Delbert, Route No. 3, Pikeville, 432-2206 
Hargis, Bob, Box 3, Calvert City, 395-4849, 395-4849 
Harvey, Bennie, 925 Center St., Henderson, VA 6-3768 
Haynes, John, 416 Clay, Henderson, VA 7-5137, 827-9891 
Helvcy, Thadus, Box 124, Coal Run 

Hinkle, Melvin B.. 21 Cameron, Paris, 987-4201, 987-1235 
Horn, Nebert, Inez 

Howard, Oscar D., 617 W. 5th St., London 
Hunter, Wayne, Route No. 1, Nicholasville 
Johnson, Ronald L., 1623 So. Virginia, Hopkinsville, TU 5-5242, 

TU 6-1741 
Keatley, James H., Route No. 2. Delbarton, W. Va. 
King. Rusoell, 943 Whitney, Lexington, 264-3049 
Kinman, Joe T., 210 Holly St., Frankfort 223-5131, 223-8791 
Kloenne, Timothy E., 703 Linden Ave., Newport, 431-5731 
Kuhry, John M., 218 Rand Ave., Lexington, 252-6632, 256-5670 
Lan.bert, Irvin G., 5110 Rural Way, Louisville, 969-4718, GL 

8-1948 
Long Robert F., 1200 S- Broadway, Apt. No. 1, Lexington, 

252-2626 (Bus.) 
McBride, Donald R., 1663 Strader Drive, Lexington. 255-2153 
Martin, Delano, Box 176, Hindman. 785-5396 
Maynard, Kenneth, Pikeville, GE 7-7723 
Meek, Walter E., Williamsport, 789-5045 
Meiman. W. A., 1700 Deer Park, Louisville, GL 1-4596, JU 

7-6897 
Middlebrooks. Chuck, 313 S. Ewing, Louisvile, 895-3665 
Miles, Francis, 1142 South 36th St., Louisville, SP 6-2331 
Miracle, Ed. Box 998, Lynch, 848-2903, 848-5486 
Mitchell, James R., Route No. 1, Nortonville, .;76-3272 
Moore, Charles David, 2403 Clarendon, Louisville, 452-1977 
Moore. Jameu E., Larkslane, 946-3166 
Pendygraft, Douglas, Crab Orchard, 355-7241, 355-2541 
Pcgue, Ivan G., 635 Kirtley, Bowling Green, 843-9972 
Ponpas, Nicholas. 1996 Republic Dr., Dayton 14, Ohio, 277-8704 
Posey, Jerry N., Beechmont, GR 6-2998 

Randall. Robert W., 502 University Dr., Somerset. 678-5260 
Reid, Wayne, 305 Forest, Berea, 986-3151 (Bus.) 
Rudder, Doug, P. O. Box 21, Frenchburg, SO 8-2423, SO 8-2423 
Rushing, Kenneth R.. Route 1, Paducah, 444-6886, 443-3631 
Schosser. Bob, Box 1101. Centre College, Danville, 236-2839 
Scott, Craig, Box 110, Totz, 589-4623 (Bus.) 

Scott, Willie Lawrence, 322 Gand Ave., Georgetown, 1694, 1600 
Stafford. Clyde. 34 W. 11th St., Newport, 431-3952 
Steele, Lowell, Route No. 1, Box 330-H, Pikeville, 432-2311 
Sturgill, Larry, Thealka, 789-4684 
Taylor. Clayton A., Alva 

Todd, Paul H., 120 Lyons Ave., Morehead, ST 4-5520, Flemings- 
burg 845-6601 
Wanchic, Nicholas, Route No. 6, Berea Road, Lexington, 255- 

1233, 262-8328 
Ward. Sam Clay, 107 Bourbon Court, Box 85, Georgetown, 1631, 

254-1877 
Wheeler, Resvie, West Liberty, SH 3-4411, SH 3-3705 
Willett, William H.. 1708 Keck Ave. Evannville, Indiana, HA 

2-1797 HA 5-6211 ext. 214 
Williams. Willie H., 560 Ash St., Lexington, 252-4201, 252-3212 
Williamson, Fred, 610 Military St., Georgetown, 500 J, 9142 
Wood, James W., 1133 Avondale Road, Owensboro, 684-1879, 

683-2401 ext 388 
Yessin, Humzey, 1024 Castleton Way South, Lexington, 266- 

4092, 266-1158 



Page Twenty 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1964 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Nine) 
played in Lexington on November 28 
amounted to $7,665.50, and that Association 
profits realized from the Class AAA final 
'game in Louisville, played on December 5, 
were $2,865.53. The Commissioner recom- 
mended that each of the four teams par- 
ticipating in the playoffs in Lexington be 
allowed an additional amount of $200.00 
for incidental expenses. Preston Holland 
moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, that 
the appropriations recommended by the 
Commissioner be allowed. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Foster J. Sanders, chairman of the 
Trophy Committee, reported that his com- 
mittee had met at the K.H.S.A.A. office on 
November 16, 1963, at which time sealed 
bids for the 1964 district and regional 
basketball tournament trophies were 
opened. He stated that samples submitted 
bv five bidders were examined, and that 
the Trophy Committee had aceeoted the 
bids of the Sport Shop, Glasgow, Kentucky, 
and the Cine Sporting Goods Company, 
Owensboro, Kentucky, for district and re- 
gional trophies respectively. The price per 
set of district trophies was $41.65, and 
$60.00 per set of regional trophies. 

School officials of the Bath County 
High School appeared before the Board of 
Control to discuss the eligibility of Bath 
County High School boys attending schools 
in Montgomery County. President Cecil A. 
Thornton advised Prin. Ekisel L. Karrick 
th"t interpretations of Association eligi- 
bility rules are made by the Commissioner, 
not by the Board of Control, and that any 
charges concerning the possible violations 
of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 10, Undue Influence, 
should be filed with the Commissioner. 

The Commissioner recommended that 
the State Swimming Committee be given 
permanent authority to make anv necessary 
adjustments and changes in the classes, 
events, and regulations in swimming. Don 
Davis moved, seconded by Sherman Gish, 
that the recommendation by the Commis- 
sioner be accepted and adopted. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner recommended that 
for the school year 1963-64 the Christian 
County High School be moved from Basket- 
ball District 7 to District 8 in order that 
each of the districts involved shall h^ve not 
less than four schools in it. Foster J. 
Sanders moved, seconded by Ralph C. 
Dorsey, that the redistricting recommend- 



ed by the Commissioner be done. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion of a possible 
Board of Control proposal concerning out- 
of-season and pre-season football and 
basketball scrimmages and games, to be 
presented to the forthcoming 1964 Delegate 
Assembly of the K.H.S.A.A. Action on the 
proposal was deferred to the January 
meeting of the Board. 

Preston Holland discussed the possi- 
bility of certain changes in football playoff 
regulations, to be put into effect for the 
1965 and 1966 football seasons. J. B. Mans- 
field stated that changes in the regulations 
for the two seasons mentioned should be 
made and announced as soon as possible, 
since such changes might effect schedule 
making. Members of the Board agreed to 
go into the matter of football playoff regu- 
lations changes at the next meeting of the 
Board, and invite interested groups to file 
with the Commissioner written suggestions 
for such changes prior to the January 
meeting of the Board. 

The Commissioner reported that, on 
December 18, 1963, he placed the Mullins 
Hififh School on probation for the remaindpr 
of the basketball season, and directed Prin. 
Landon Hunt to relieve Assistant Coach 
Morris Justice of his coaching duties for 
a period of thirty days. The Commissioner 
stated that Mr. Justice, a second-team 
basketball coach, had removed his team 
from the floor shortly before half time in 
a game played between the Dorton and 
Mullins second teams on December 7, 1963, 
at Dorton. The Commissioner said that he 
considered the action of Coach Justice a 
violation of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 17, Practice 
of Sportsmanship. 

Gran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don 
R. Rawlings, that the next meeting of the 
Board of Control be held in Louisville on 
January 25, 1964. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Ralph 
C. Dorsey, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning September 28, 
1963, and ending December 20, 1963, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Lexington, Ky. 

School Representative 

Jack Smith 

302 Ohio St., Somerset, Ky. 

Phone 679-1211 

Button Down Sweaters (in stock) $12.50 

6" Chenille Letters (Plain) $ 1.35 

Leather Sleeved Jackets $18.95 

Adidas Track Shoes and Flats (in stock) 

Large selection of trophies in stock 

We engrave in our store. Try our speedy service. 

Spanjian Baseball Uniforms 

School Sweat Shirts (We do the work in store) 

See us for volume prices. Also T shirts 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 277-3977 Dick Wallace 



WATCH FOR THE 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUR 

1964-65 COVERAGES 



^Ue. Kuufde4^ Com/pxiH4f general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

12H123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 255-0835 

P.O. BOX 7116 



K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Lexington in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following : 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed ^v Coach Adolnh Rupp 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 

No. ARX Last Bilt ball made by Spalding. 

Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament 

in Lexington. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets^ 2.000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbererl consecutivelv. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams. All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-sihaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and rect- 
angular glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once 
delivery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PI-AY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick- A- Way FF-IS Fair-Play in our warehouse 
ready for immediate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium be- 
fore tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL. ED HENDLEY or C. A. BYRN, JR. are al- 
ways ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




Ship The DaV You BuV 





CLASS AAA STATE CHAMPION LOUISVILLE MALE 




.e6.;,g7;50f8',^'3; 







■ ' ^tw44s? 



■A^^*^'^' 



^0 



« ■ ^ j^ ca. m^mm 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Eugene Malone, John Shumate, James Hikes, Roger Blan- 
kenship, Wendell Ennis, Bill Ferry. Sherrill Nunnelly, Albert Jordan, Bill Green, Ronald 
Wyatt, Charles Miller, Jerry Findel, Charles Kuhn. Second Row : Paul Kuhn, Dennis Fish- 
er, Charles Hunt, Garnett Phelps, Ronald Koans, James Henrj, George Madison, John 
Schrecker, Gilbert Heheman, Bill Whaley. Third Row: Claude Smith, Dale Forrest, James 
Forrest, Don Wiggington, Larry Stamp, Larry Jones, Larry Norwood, Wayne Ross, Bill 
Cline. Fourth Row-; Charles Collins, Ronald Long, Edward Nelson, Joe Telle, Bill Bower- 
man, Bill Bryan, Danny Dinkier, Terry Kechner, Othello Brim. Fifth Row: Mgr. Wallace 
Floyd, Dale Womack, Dave Meredith, Bob Thurman, Bob Floyd, David Waugh, James 
Rogers, Carl Dorsey, Mgr. Sonny Skidmore. 



Male 19 — DeSaies 7 
Male 13 — Atherton 
Male 21 — Paducah 7 
Male 14 — Flaget 12 



Male 25 — St. Xavier 20 
Male 35 — Shawnee 
Male 22 — Trinity 6 
Male 25 — New Albany 6 
Male 28 — Central 6 



PLAYOFF 

Male 23 — Waegen 



Official Organ of tlie 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



February, 1964 



Letter from the Commissioner 

Lexington, Ky. 
January 27, 1964 
To The District Tournament Manager: 
Will you Dlease refer to your K.H.S.A.A. booklet 
which gives rules and regulations governing basket- 
ball tournaments. You should familiarize yourself 
with these rules, found on pages 27-35. Your special 
attention is called to the second paragraph of 
Tournament Rule VI-A-3, relative to the enrollment 
of your district coaches in the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association. 

The forms for your various reports are self- 
explanatory. The report of games should be mailed 
to the manager of the regional tournament not 
later than Monday, March 9. Send your financial 
report, your checked eligibility lists, and the second 
copy of the report of games to the Commissioner as 
soon after the tournament as possible. For your 
convenience, the following check list is given; 

1. Invite member schools to your tournament 
AT ONCE, reminding each school to send each 
other member school in the district a COMPLETE 
preliminary list of players before February 1, and 
to send you THREE copies of a final list one week 
prior to the district Tournament. See Rule VIH. 

2. Announce the time of drawings in your letter. 
See Rule IX. 

3. At your meeting, conduct the drawings and 
select the officials. The state plan for division of 
tournament receipts is recommended. If any other 
plan is used, a majority vote of the participating 
schools must be obtained. 

4. Your attention is calkd to the last paragraph 
of Tournament Rule V-A, which says: ''An official 
shall not work a district or regional tom-nament 
in the district or region in which he resides." The 
following procedure has been established by the 
Board of Control in the selection of tournament of- 
ficials under authority given in Tournament Rule 
V-A: (a) Each school represented at the meeting 
may submit the names of one or more officials. 
There shall be a minimum of eight names on the 
list of officials to bi- voted on. NO NAME SHALL 
BE MARKED OFF THE LIST, (b) Each school 
representative shall rank eight officials in the order 
of his preference, the first choice being assigned 
eight points, the second seven points, etc. (c) The 
tournament manager shall communicate at once 
with the highest ranking official or officials in the 
order of their rank. If the official who is selected 
can not be reached during the day of the meeting, 
or if he is not available, the tournament manager 
shall attempt to employ the next official or officials 
on the list in the order of their selection, (d) If 
two officials are tied on points, the highest ranking 
official shall be determined by flipping a coin, (e) 
If none of the officials on the list is available the 
tournament manager shall have the sole responsi- 
bility of securing an official or officials for the 
tournament. 

5. Tournament Rule XV now says: "The Board 
of Control is authorized to select, standardize, and 
purchase trophies for all district and regional 
tournaments and the cost of these trophies shall be 
borne by the respective districts and regions." The 
Board has contracted with the Sport Shop of Glas- 
gow, Kentucky, to supply all of the official K.H.S. 
A. A. district first place and second place basketball 
trophies for the 1964 tournaments, each trophy com- 
plete with the Association seal and engraving. Your 
trophies will be shipped to you prior to March 1. 

6. It is the responsibility of the tournament 
manager to secure adequate police protection. 

7. THE BOARD OF CONTROL HAS RULED 
THAT NOT MORE THAN TWELVE PLAYERS 




^f$^.'^ 



Pat Ehrler 



In the ]9e3 K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country Run, held 
in Lexington on November 16, Pat Ehrler of Louis- 
ville Atherton set a new individual record of 
9:15. The distance was 1-8 miles which was short 
of the usual distance. 

MAY BE IN UNIFORM FOR ANY ONE TOURNA- 
MENT GAME, AND THAT OTHER SQUAD MEM- 
BERS SHALL NOT BE ALLOWED TO PARTICI- 
PATE IN WARM-UP EXERCISES, THIS BEING 
IMPLIED IN TOURNAMENT RULE XI. 

8. Please ask your officials to designate the 
goals prior to the warm-up time for each game. 

9. You will receive three copies of a final 
eligibility list from each school. Have one of these 
checked by the coach of each competing team, be- 
fore his team plays, for the twelve players he 
will use in each game. Use only one list for check- 
ing players on each team since the other two 
copies may be needed by the regional and state 
tournament managers. Send the Commissioner all 
of these checked copies with your other reports. 
Send the two unchecked copies of eligibility lists 
of the winner and runner-up to the manager of 
your regional tournament, along with one copy of 
your report of games, not later than March 2. 

10. It has been ruled that the 2:00 o'clock 
mentioned in Tournament Rule IV-B may be con- 
sidered Eastern Standard time or 1:00 P.M. CEN- 
TRAL STANDARD TIME. This information con- 
cerning the starting time of the regional meeting 
should be given to your winner and runner-up. 

11. Send Secretary Ohr of the Kentucky Coaches 
Association the list of district coaches to be en- 
rolled in his organization and remittance for these, 
and send the Commissioner the various reports 
mentioned above as soon as possible. 

12. Tournament Rule VI-A-3 provides that the 
district representative to the annual meeting may 
be allowed for expenses an amount not to exceed 
$50.00. Since this is a maximum and not necessarily 
a fixed amount, the delegate should be asked to 
submit an estimate of the cost of his lodging, 
transportation, and meals because of his represent- 
ing the district at the annual meeting. 

Sincerely yours, 
Ted Sanford 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1964 



.00 Per Year 



odify 
early 



EARLY SEASON WRESTLING QUESTIONS 

the mat. Should near-pin be called and wrestlers be 
brought back to the center? 

Ruling: Any time the defensive wrestler is hav- 
ing- difficulty bridging because of mats sliding 
or the bare floor being exposed, the referee shall 
stop the match and bring the wrestlers back to the 
center of the mat. It is possible he will award 
near-pin points in such a situation, and, in nearly 
all situations, predicament points would be awarded. 

8. Situation: Wrestlers are wrestling near the 
edge of the mat and "A" puts a half nelson on 
"B" and turns him into a near-pin. However, "B's" 
head is touching outside the boundary line of the 
wrestling area as he is turned into the near-pin 
situation. Is "A" awarded near-pin points? 

Ruling: This could not constitute a predicament 
or near-pin inasmuch as the head of the defensive 
wrestler was outside the wrestling area when the 
predicament or near-pin situation actually occurred. 
No points would be awarded. 

9. Situation: "A" applies a figure four siessors 
to "B" and flattens "B" on the mat. "A" attempts to 
secure a half nelson, but is unable to get the hold 
because "B" covers up. Neither wrestler is able to 
improve his situation, and the wrestlers remain in 
this position. 

Ruling: After approximately fifteen seconds 
have elapsed the referee shall stop the match and 
declare a stalemate. The wrestlers are then re- 
started from the Referee's Position on the mat 
with "A" on top. 

10. Situation: In a dual meet "A" needs to win 
by fall if his team is to win the meet. "A" goes 
behind "B" and brings him to the mat. "B" flattens 
himself out on the mat to prevent "A" from pinn- 
ing him and 'B" makes no attempt to escape. 

Ruling: "B" is stalling and should be penalized. 

11. Situation: During a match "A" loses one of 
his low-cut shoes. Coach of "B" claims that the 
low-cut shoes are illegal and that the match should 
be defaulted. 

Ruling: Coach of "B" was correct in stating that 
the low-cut shoes are illegal. Shoes must reach 
above the ankle. The referee should check on the 
legality of the equipment before the match starts. 
In the interest of good sportsmanship, a wrestler 
wearing low-cuts should be asked to exchange shoes 
with a teammate wearing regulation shoes, or the 
low-cut shoes should be taped on and the wrestlers 
permitted to complete the catch. It is illegal to 
wrestle without shoes. 

12. Situation: "A" has "B" in a pinning situation 
and as he attempts to press "B" to the mat, "B" 
pushes fist into face of "A" in an attempt to escape. 
What should referee do? 

Ruling: The referee should not necessarily stop 
the match, but he should pull the hand away and 
tell the defensive wrestler he has committed an in- 
fraction. In the event "A" does not pin "B", he may 
have earned near-pin points as well as an unnecess- 
ary roughness point. 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These ruiines do not set asid 
any rule. They are interpretations on some of 
season situations which have been presented. 

1. Situation: A "pancake" or circular mat is 
painted on a 38' x 38' square mat. In such an ar- 
rangement legal? 

Ruling: Yes, because the size of the square mat 
allows a circular area with a 28 foot diameter, 
and also makes it possible to have the required 6 
foot mat area around it. 

2. Situlation: In a neighboring town, there is 
a question about the accuracy of the scale used to 
weigh the wrestlers. What can be done to correct 
the situation ? 

Ruling: The rules book provides, "It is recom- 
mended that the accuracy of all scales be certified 
by a qualified scale authority." Therefore, it is a 
reasonable request to have the school authorities 
arrange to have the scale inspected. 

3. Situation: Sleeveless shirts are mandatory 
for intersoholastic wrestlers. What is the procedure 
if a wrestler appears wearing a "T" shirt? 

Ruling: It depends on the circumstances. If his 
school is just starting a wrestling program, it may 
be the school does not have the means of providing 
sleeveless shirts, or it could be the wrestler is al- 
lergic to a woolen shirt and needs to wear a cotton 
shirt. Each situation should be met in the spirit of 
good sportsmanship, but the violators should be 
asked to follow the rules as soon as it is possible 
for them to do so. 

4. Situation: May the physician attending a 
tournament weigh-in disqualify one of the wrestlers 
because his skin condition might impair the health 
of other wrestlers? 

Ruling: Yes, the rule states that such "be con- 
sidered full and sufficient reason for dis-qualifica- 
tion." It is also recommended that an adequate 
medical examination of all contestants be made at 
the time of weighing-in for all meets. 

5. Situation: What should the referee do in 
situations in which a hold, usually considered legi- 
timate, is forced to the extent it endangers life or 
limb, or to the point where the hold becomes purely 
punishing ? 

Ruling: The referee should require the hold to 
be broken, with a time-out. The contestant who had 
the advantage should be put in the position of 
advantage in the Referee's Position on the mat. 

6. Situation: Offensive wrestler has committed 
and been called for three previous infractions and 
further warned that one more infraction would 
result in disqualification. He then proceeds to inter- 
lock hands around the opponent's waist to prevent 
a reversal. What is the responsibility of the referee? 

Ruling: The fourth penalty for a technical viola- 
tion or infraction requires automatic disqualification 
as provided bv the penalty chart. The referee has 
no alternative. 

7. Situation: In a pinning situation, "B's" legs 
are entirely off the mat, and he is having difficulty 
bridging because his feet slip on the surface outside 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



FEBRUARY, 1964 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 7 



Poblished moRthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hiffh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication. Lexineton. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

I^exington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President __. Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64). Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-67). Independence: Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66). Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; 
Preston Holland (1961-65); Murray: Don R. Raw'ings (1961-65). 
Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville. 

Subscription Rate ^- $1.00 Per Year 

ZI*iom the Commission'^ s Office 

1964 District Tournament Sites 

1. Fulton County 32. Grant County 

2. Ballarii Memorial 33. Lloyd Memorial 

3. Sedalia 34. Covington 

4. Murray College Catholic 

5. Lyon County 35. Newport Catholic 

6. West Hopkins 36. Highlands 

7. Trigg County 37. Georgetown 

8. Todd Co. 38 Pendleton 

Central 89. Maysville 

9. Webster County 40. Paris 

10. Henderson 41. Frankfort 

11. Livermore 42. Jessamine Co. 

12. Owensboro 43. University 

13. Meade County 44. Madison Central 

14. Butler County 45. Boyle County 

15. Beaver Dam 46. Memorial 

16. Muhlenberg 47. Somerset 
Central 48. London 

17. Bowling Green 49. Tyner 

18. Russellville 50. Barbourville 

19. Scottsville 51. Bell County 

20. Metcalfe County 52. Loyall 

21. Campbellsville 53. Whitesburg 

22. LaRue County 54. Hazard 

23. Elizabethtown 55. Cordia 

24. Bardstown 56. Powell County 

25. Flaget 57. Dorton 

26. duPont Manual 58. Garrett 

27. Southern 59. Blaine 

28. Fern Creek 60. Sandy Hook 

29. Shepherdsville 61. Mt. Sterling 

30. Shelby County 62. Rowan County 

31. Henry County 63. McKell 

64. Russell 
1964 Regional Tournament Sites 
(1) Murray State College (2) West 
Hopkins High School, (3) Daviess County 
High School, (4) Central City High School, 
(5) Western Kentucky State College, (6) 
Adair County High School, (7) Louisville, 
(8) Henry County High School, (9) Camp- 
bell County High School, (10) Harri.son 
County High School, (11) University High 
School, (12) Boyle County High School, 



(13) Bell County High School, (14) Hazard 
High School, (15) Prestonsburg High 
School, (16) Morehead State College. 

Certified Officials 

Three additional officials have qualified 
for the Certified rating since the list of 
these higher rated officials appeared in the 
January issue of the ATHLETE. They are: 
Bill Nau, Logan Powell, Cleo Pursifull. 



News About Swimming 

The 1964 Class A State High School 
Swimming Meet will be held in Louisville on 
Friday evening and Saturday, February 21- 
22, at the Plantation Swim Club pool, 8609 
Westport Road. There will be a division for 
boys and one for girls. There will also be 
two divisions for the smaller schools in the 
Class B State Swimming Meet scheduled to 
be held at the University of Kentucky 
pool, Lexington, on April 3-4. 

Class A will include those high schools 
with an enrollment of 750' or more (grades 
9-"' 2), and Class B will include those schools 
with an enrollment of less than 750. Any 
school may enter a class above its classi- 
fication. 

All divisions will have eleven events this 
year. Individual contestants may enter only 
two events, including fancy diving. The 
events are: 200 Yard Medley Relay, 200 
Yard Freestyle, 50 Yard Freestyle, 200 
Yard Individual Medlev, Fancy Diving, 100 
Yard Butterfly, 100 Yard Freestyle, 100 
Yard Backstroke, 400 Yard Freestyle, 100 
Yard Breaststroke, and 200 Yard Freestyle 
Relay. 

All diving will be in accordance with 
regulations given in the 1964 N. C. A. A. 
Swimming Guide. 

Teams are limited to four entries in 
each event except the relays. A school may 
be represented by only one relay team. 
Girls may enter the meet only as members 
of girls' teams. 

The Friday evening session in each 
meet will include all of the diving events 
for both boys and girls. Each finalist will 
give a demonstration dive during the final 
Saturday afternoon session. 

The method of entering teams in the 
meet will be the same as in past years, with 
the State Office supplying entry blanks to 
the schools whose principals have indicated 
that they will enter teams in the meet. The 
Association will refund one-half for trans- 
portation, lodging and meals expenses, based 
on the State Track Meet allowance of these 
items. One-half of the expenses of the 
swimming coach will be paid if the school 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



Page Three 



has as many as four entries in the State 
Meet. 



In Memoriam 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Ashworth, George. 210 Virginia, Dayton, Ohio, Lebanon, Ohio 

3-1851, 885-3610 
Dickson, Tom, 1134 Hogan, Portsmouth, Ohio 
Greer. Thomas E., 2835 Bexley Court, Louisville, 897-2323, 

897-2521 
Keeton, C. E., Route No. 3, Franklin, 586-4253. VI 3-3040 
Kinney, Hall M., 435 E. Pleasant St., Cynthiana, 234-4421, 234- 

Logue, Ronald G., 514 Maple Ave., Danville, 236-3580, 236-3905 
Mingua, Ronald, Geiinantown 

Nau, Bill, Box 209, Barbourville, 6-4112, 6-3057 
Peters, Harold Dean, 220 Dalray Drive, Lexington, 255-5918 
Powell, Logan, 771 Shelby, Lexington, 254-1213, 252-7676 
PursifuU, Cleophus, 808 Dorchester Ave.. Middlesboro 
Reliford, Paul G.. 2912 Prichard, Ashland, 326-2109 
Taylor, Denn'u H., 1406 Hughes St., Murray, PL 3-4825, PL 
3-5022 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday 
afternoon, January 25, 1964. The meeting 
was called to order by President Cecil A. 
Thornton at 2:30, with all Board members. 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford and Assis- 
tant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, second by Don 
Davis, that the reading of the minutes of 
the December 21st meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by 
Gran C. Teater, that the following regula- 
tions concerning fees for the regional bas- 
ketball tournament officials be adopted: 
The official shall receive a fee of $25.00 
per game and a transportation allowance of 
8 cents per mile for all necessary travel. 
In the event that it is necessary for the 
official to remain overnight at the tourna- 
ment site, he shall be paid an additional 
$10. 00 per day for lodging and meals. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by 
Don Davis, that the Board of Control recom- 
mend to representatives of teams enterinig 
regional tournaments that regional tourna- 
ment plans provide that no official shall 
work more than one game in one session. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Don 
R. Rawlings, that the Commissioner be 
authorized to set the dates and determine 
the sites of spring meets and tournaments. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that there 
(Continued on Paige Ten) 




Lloyd McDermott 

Death came on January 16, 1964, to 
Coach Lloyd "Big Mac" McDermott, mem- 
ber of the Holmes High School faculty. 
Mr. McDermott, who was thirty-seven years 
of age, died after two weeks' illness. 

"Big Mac" had been one of Northern 
Kentucky's top gridiron stars. After achiev- 
ing all-state honors as a lineman for Cov- 
ington Holmes in the early forties, he 
starred at the University of Kentucky 
where he was an all-conference tackle under 
Coach Paul Bryant. Following his collegi- 
ate career, he turned pro and played de- 
fensive guard for the Chicago Cardinals, 
Philadelphia Egales and Detroit Lions. He 
played his final year in professional football 
with the Ottawa Rough Rides in the Canad- 
ian League. He served thirty months in 
the Marine Corp during World War II. 

Coach McDermott graduated from the 
University of Kentucky in 1950 with a B.A. 
degree in Education. He had taught health 
and coached athletic teams at Holmes since 
1957. He was varsity line coach for the 
school's football team, and he also served 
as freshman basketball coach. 

Surviving Mr. McDermott are his wife, 
Jinny, and five children, Kathleen, Maureen, 
Timothy, Phillip and Rodney. Other sur- 
vivors are two brothers, Raymond and Rus- 
sell McDermott, both of Dayton, Ohio. Mr. 
McDermott was a member of St. Mark 
United Church of Christ, Covington. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



The Flying Dutchman 

Claude Ricketts just called to say that 
the Louisville-Falls Cities Basketball Of- 
ficials' Association has voted unanimously 
to recommend that Dave Longenecker be 
given an honorary Lionheart Award for 
his tremendous courage. Dave refereed the 
Sun Bowl football game a few years ago, 
has contributed greatly to the improvement 
of basketball officiating, and all the while 
he was fighting off one heart attack after 
another. After an attack last year, Dave's 
doctor ordered him to hang up his whistle. 

It makes us all a little sad when we 
hear that another champion has "thrown 
the torch" to the youngsters following in 
the footprints he left in the sands of time— 
and Dave left some big ones. Kids will 
never have a finer example of courageous, 
wholesome manhood to pattern from than 
Dave. Gentle, kind and determined, Dave 
Longenecker has been sent the first 
honorary Lionheart Award ever presented 
by the Dutchman. He is a real big brother 
to every kid who will ever be eligible for 
a Game Guy Award. 

Roy Settle, Owensboro's golf-playing 
banker and the only parbuster who could 
match the Longenecker golf shots, has a 
recommendation of his own for the Game 
Guy Award of 1964. Because of the interest 
Roy has taken in physically handicapped 
athletes, Jerry Elliott, who was an out- 
standing tackle on the Owensboro Senior 
High team, has been added to the list of 
young fighters who will be considered for 
this year's Game Guy trophy. At the age of 
seven this courageous youngster developed 
a cataract when hit in the eye by a base- 
ball. The next time you are in Owensboro 
drop in at Barney's Peppermint Grill. 
Jerry's Lionheart statuette will be there for 
you to see. 

There's another award going to Owens- 
boro Senior High. My Old buddy, Lawrence 
McGinnis, and his up-and-coming protege. 
Coach Bobby Watson, get the salute for 
this one. These chaps have not only been 
cooperating with Roy Settle to improve 
basketball officiating in their region, but 
they have won one Abou Ben Adhem cita- 
tion for January because of their promotion 
of friendly relation in the field of athleti'cs. 
Daviess County High and Henderson Holy 
Family claimed two more Abou Ben Adhem 
awards when basketball officials praised 
them for their warm hospitality to the 
"men with the whistles." 

In case you didn't know it, Roy Settle 




Roy Settle 

is starting his third decade of basketball 
officiating. It's doubtful if he or anybody 
else will ever catch up with Kentucky's 
Methuselahs, "Jolly John" Heldman and 
"Black Jack" Thompson, who are finishing 
their fourth decades. "Black Jack" worked 
a state tournament with the Dutchman 
away back in 1946, and he can still run 
the length of the hardwood without stopp- 
ing. 

Ludlow boasts of a bachelor doctor who 
is loved as a father by the city's population 
of kids. Dan Sullivan who coaches foot- 
ball and Carl Wenderoth who does the same 
chore in basketball say he is the chap who 
should be honored with the Corn Cob Pipe 
for January for his unselfish service. The 
Dutchman agrees, and Doctor James F. 
Siles has his Kentucky thoroughbred with 
the Kentucky cob adorning its neck on his 
desk right now. "Doc" never misses a Lud- 
low game because he wants to be near when- 
ever any of his beloved young athletes 
need him. "Doc" was presented his award 
by the northern Kentucky Adonis, George 
"The Whistler" Maines. 

Here's something' for you baseball 
coaches. At the World Series Party in Der- 
bytown last night Jack McGrath announced 
that Hillerich and Bradsby would make 
their sixteen millimeter World Series Film 
available to baseball coaches who request 
it. Write Jack at his bat office in Louisville. 
This is an exceptional color film — and Jack 
McGrath is an exceptionally personable and 
public-spirited gentleman. 

(Continued on Page Six) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



Page Five 



Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 
Member Schools--1963 



SCHOOL 

Andeiuon 

Aquinas 

Atherton 

Attucks 

Austin-Tracy 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Bishop David 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Boyle County 

Bryan Station 

Burgin 

Butler 

Caldwell County 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Rob 

Carrollton 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Christian Co 

Clark County 

Corbin 

Crittenden Co 

Cumberland 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dayton 

DeSales 

Dixie Heig'hts 

Douglass ( HendeitaO 

DuBois 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

East Main 

Eastern 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fairdale 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming Co 

Fleming-Neon 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin Co 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Gamaliel 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Halll 

Harlan 

Harrison Co 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson Co 

Henry Clay 

Henry County 

High Street 

H'ghlandB 

Hiseville 

Holmes 

Hopkinsville 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

Jessamine Co 

K. M. I 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue Co 

Leslie Co 

Lily 

Lebanon 









OTHER 


SCHOOL 




COACH 




OFFICIALS 






G 


F 


P 


E G 


F 


p 


E 


9 


2 


1 


27 


7 


1 





26 1 


2 








28 


1 








24 


6 


2 





38 


5 








35 


11 








20 


9 





1 


20 


5 





3 


21 


6 


1 





16 


1 








22 


1 








22 


5 


3 


3 


23 


4 


1 


4 


20 


11 








13 


10 








8 


11 


2 


1 


19 


7 








17 


5 


3 





25 


5 


2 





23 


4 


1 


5 


37 


1 





2 


36 


6 


1 





31 


3 


1 





26 


12 


3 





39 


5 








33 


6 








30 


5 








26 


6 


6 


7 


26 


4 


1 


1 


29 


11 


2 


1 


34 


10 








32 


7 


5 


7 


30 


7 








24 1 


1 








32 


3 








32 [ 


9 


1 





35 


6 








37 


1 








6 


1 








6 


11 


5 





32 


9 


2 





29 


6 


1 





44 


3 








42 1 


8 


3 





31 


4 








25 1 


3 








34 


3 








32 1 


4 


1 





4 


4 








3 1 


11 


2 





24 


6 


1 





14 


7 


t; 


1 


29 


7 


2 


1 


22 


3 








28 


5 








22 


28 





1 


24 


30 





1 


22 1 


4 


4 





27 


2 


3 





26 1 


3 








31 


2 





c 


31 1 


6 








30 


6 








27 1 


5 





1 


36 


2 





"1 


27 


6 





3 


34 


4 








32 


R 


5 


2 


29 


7 








27 


11 


5 


2 


28 


10 


1 


1 


26 1 


14 








20 


12 








20 1 


3 


1 





39 


3 


1 





36 1 


5 








30 


3 








20 1 


4 





1 


19 


4 








8 1 


1 








24 


1 








23 1 


K 








38 


7 








36 1 


IK 


2 


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39 


P 


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29 1 


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1 


44 


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40 1 


12 








32 


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29 1 





2 





35 


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34 1 


9 


3 





34 


8 








31 1 


11 





1 


19 


10 








18 1 


2 


1 





30 


4 








28 1 


8 








38 


5 








3H 1 


13 


4 


2 


31 


8 








27 1 


7 


6 


() 


40 


10 


1 





38 1 


9 


1 


1 


22 


9 





1 


19 1 


5 








28 


6 








22 1 


4 








30 


3 








25 1 


11 


4 


2 


30 


8 


1 


1 


29 1 


15 


6 


1 


23 


9 


1 


1 


25 1 


1 7 


5 


3 


29 


7 


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29 1 


1 fi 


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47 











36 1 


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23 


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22 1 


1 5 





1 


24 


3 


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16 1 


1 8 


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23 


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20 1 


4 


3 


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34 


5 


2 





33 1 


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3 


33 


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30 1 


5 


4 


4 


21 


5 


1 





20 1 


1 








27 


2 








26 1 


9 


2 





23 


6 








21 1 


8 


1 





26 


9 








28 1 


2 








23 


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22 1 


1 








24 


1 








23 


1 3 








38 


2 








33 


1 8 





2 


29 


6 


1 





28 


1 8 








29 


10 








28 


1 10 








26 


e 


1 





25 1 


1 * 








13 


2 








10 1 


1 2 





2 


39 


2 








35 1 


1 5 


1 


2 


25 


5 


1 





18 1 


1 7 








28 


6 








25 1 


8 


3 





34 


5 








33 1 


8 


1 





26 


6 








24 1 


7 








41 


5 








36 1 


5 


1 





37 


3 








34 1 


6 








36 


3 








36 1 











31 











29 ' 


3 








30 


5 


1 





30 1 


6 


2 


1 


17 


5 


1 





15 1 


1 10 


4 





27 


8 





1 


24 1 


1 5 


1 


2 


12 


6 





2 


14 1 


1 5 








18 


3 








18 1 


1 5 


1 





24 


5 








22 1 



CROWD 






TEAM 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


8 


1 





27 


6 


1 


5 








27 


2 





S 





1 


36 


7 


1 


H 





1 


17 


11 


1 


8 


4 





17 


8 


1 


1 








20 


3 





K 


2 


3 


19 


7 


4 


15 








8 


14 


1 


10 








16 


9 


1 


7 


2 





19 


7 


4 


2 





2 


29 


7 





7 





2 


26 


7 


1 


9 


1 


1 


32 


11 


2 


9 








28 


7 





3 








28 


3 


1 


14 








29 


16 





6 


3 


4 


21 


11 


6 


3 





1 


34 


2 





4 








36 


3 


2 


1 








6 


1 





13 








26 


13 


2 


5 








42 


5 





11 








22 


13 


1 


5 








31 


6 





4 


1 





3 


5 





15 


3 


1 


19 


12 


2 


9 


6 


2 


25 


12 


2 


10 


1 





23 


10 





31 





1 


27 


26 


1 


5 


1 





20 


4 


5 


2 








31 


2 





8 


1 





27 


16 





9 


2 





29 


7 


2 


3 


3 





25 


9 


4 


7 


2 





29 


7 





13 


1 





19 


18 


3 


12 








23 


9 





6 








38 


6 





13 








24 


9 





5 





1 


11 


7 


5 


2 








22 


3 





8 








36 


9 





16 





1 


29 


13 


3 


5 


1 





44 


2 





17 


1 





30 


17 





3 








35 


2 





11 


1 





30 


11 





10 


3 





18 


9 


3 


4 





2 


24 


4 


3 


8 








32 


11 





11 


1 





27 


10 


2 


12 


1 





38 


13 


2 


10 


2 


1 


20 


9 


3 


8 


3 


1 


20 


11 


2 


8 








23 


8 


2 


7 


2 


2 


28 


7 


5 


5 


1 


3 


19 


11 


3 


8 








29 


6 


2 


12 








35 


11 


2 


8 








21 


9 





8 


4 





21 


6 


1 


9 


1 





22 


8 





6 


2 


1 


32 


5 


3 


7 


1 


1 


28 


8 


1 


5 


2 





15 


4 


3 


3 








25 


4 





8 








21 


8 





7 








28 


6 


1 


2 


1 





22 


3 





2 








24 


1 





5 


1 


1 


29 


10 


1 


9 








22 


14 


1 


11 








31 


8 





6 


3 





25 


6 


3 


5 








11 


4 





5 


1 





37 


4 





10 


1 


2 


23 


8 





8 








25 


8 





6 








31 


8 





R 


2 





23 


7 


2 


8 


2 





34 


12 





R 








35 


3 


2 


4 








35 


6 





2 








27 


4 





6 








31 


5 





fi 


2 





18 


5 





10 


1 


1 


19 


12 


5 


4 





2 


14 


4 





3 








18 


3 





9 








23 


7 


1 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



Lincoln (Franklin) 
Lincoln iPaducah) . 

Lincoln Inst 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa 

Louisville Ct. Day__ 

Louisville Male 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

Madison 

Madison Central 

Mad:«onville 

Mayfield 

M. C. Napier 

Mercer Co 

Metcalfe Co 

Middlesborough 

M. M. I 

Morgan Co 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic — 

Nicholas Co 

North TIardin 

Oldham Co 

Old Ky. Home 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Cath 

Owen County 

Paducah Tilghman,. 

Paint Lick 

Paints ville 

Paris 

Park City 

Paul Blazer 

P. L. Dunbar 

Pike^ille 



Pie 



ille 



Ridge Park 

Prestonsburg- 

Providence 

Raceland 

Rowan Co 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Joseph (Bardutown) 
St. Xa 



Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby Co 

Shelbyville 

Shepherds ville 

Somerset 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill 

Thom.-is Jefferson- 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg Co 

Trinity 

Valley 

Waggoner 

Wallins 

Warren Co 

Western (Shively)- 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Woodford Co 

Wurtland 



4 I 
15 I 
6 I 



4 



9 I 9 1 



12 I 
19 I 



21 I 
31 I 
27 I 
20 I 
24 I 



37 I 
25 I 
15 I 
36 I 
34 I 
29 I 



THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Four) 
In March, when we passed the new rule 
which stops the clock on all violations, the 
Dutchman had reservations — ^but no more. 
Dean Eagle, sports editor of The Louisville 
Times, cooperated with the Rules Committee 
to get the facts about the time consumed 
under this rule. He wrote in his "Press 
Box" that he personally timed the Louis- 
ville-St. Louis game and found that the 



clock was stopped for only three minutes 
and 2 seconds on violations. Dean's timing 
supports the time study reports coming in 
from many sections of the country. 

Send your reactions to the rules to the 
Flying Dutchman, Colonial Manor, Jeffer- 
sontown. The National Basketball Rules 
Committee meets next month. 

Here's a January thought : He who prays 
for himself alone impoverishes his own 
petition. 



THE KENTUCKY HUGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



Page Seven 



Schools' Ratings On 
Football Officials 

The following ratings were received on football 
officials registered with tiie K.H.S.A.A. during 1963- 
1964. The numbers follov/ing each name represent 
respectively the number of Excellent, Good, Fair, and 
Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abele, George, 8-16-1-0; Adki.-^s, Wendell L., 0-1-1- 
0; Adkins, James A., Jr., 0-2-0-0; Allen, Charles E., 
3-7-2-0; Alston, E. Daedom. 0-1-2-2; Anders, Raleigh 
A., 3-3-2-0; Anderson, E. W., Jr., 5-4-0-0; Ashworth, 
Fred G., 0-2-0-0; At-kinson, Charles, 4-5-2-1; 

Bahnsen, John C, Jr., 0-1-0-0; Baker, Charles J., 
5-1-0-0; Barbour, Morris H., 0-2-1-0; Barlow, Billy B., 
5-5-3-0; BarMtt, Willis E., Jr., 0-3-0-0; Barrett, Rob- 
ert D., 1-0-0-0; Bartels, Jchn, 2-5-0-0; Baughn, E. L., 
6-2-0-0; Beck, C. Norman, 5-10-3-0; Beheler, Donald 
S., 1-4-0-0; Bell, Ch.rence T., 1-6-0-0; Bennett, How- 
ard, 8-3-0-0; Benton, Janics L., 0-1-1-0; Benzinger, 
Joseph, 1-5-0-0; Berger, John D., Jr., 5-3-0-2; Bero, 
James J., 0-4-0-1; Blackburn, Adrian, 0-7-1-0; Black- 
burn, Tennyson, 2-3-0-0; Blankenbaker, Kenneth, 0-1- 
0-1; Blanto.i, Homer, 4-4-0-0; Blosser, Kermit A., 2-0- 
0-0; Bocook, George A., 4-5-0-0; Boeh, Bill, 4-1-0-1; 
Boemker, Bob, 5-7-1-0; Boi;d, Jsck C, 5-4-0-0; Bordy, 
Philip, 4-4-0-0; Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 5-18-4-3; Bow- 
man, E. G., 10-7-0-0; Boyle.-^, Jerry F., 1-13-1-0; Bran- 
denburg, Donald E., 3-1-1-0; Brewer, Clyde U., 1-3-1-2; 
Brichler, Joe A., 3-2-0-0; Brizendine, Vic, 10-12-2-1; 
Brotzge, IMaurice J., 10-11-1-0; Brown, Bill, 3-9-2-0; 
Brown, Herm-n G,, 0-1-0-0; Brown, John W., 6-7-0-0; 
Bullock, Teddy, 6-4-2-1; Bunn, Gary L., 0-0-2-0; 
Burke, Daniel P., 2-4-0-0; Burke, Harry R., 13-4-3- 
0; Burton, James E., 1.4-0-1; Burton, John, 3-6-1-1; 
Byrd, Harry G., 3-5-1-3; 

Cain, Paul D., 3-4-1-0; Caldwell, Charles M., 0- 
1-4-1; Caiman, E. C, Jr., 1-6-0-2; Canaday, Jacy 
Glenn, 1-1-0-0; Canady, Ray B., 4-6-0-0; Canter, 
John, 4-11-1-1; Carlson, David A., 8-4-1-0; Carrico, 
John, 1-3-0-0; Carroll, James L., 3-2-0-0; Cathey, 
Gane, 7-3-0-0; Cecil, A. Morris, 12-3-1-0; Chinn, 
Ralph, 4-9-2-0; Clark, Bill W., 1-2-0-0; Clark, Maxie, 
B., 1-0-0-0; Clemmons, Sam P., 2-4-1-0 ;Clinard, Fred 
L., 3-1-1-1; Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 4-3-1-0; Coleman, 
Duke, 1-1-1-0; Coley, Gene, 1-0-0-0; Cook, Jack W., 
1-0-0-0; Cook, Walter E., 0-1-1-0; Corea, Frank, 2-1- 
1-0; Coulter, William M., 0-1-1-0; Cowan, Robert L., 
3-1-1-0; Craft, Albert B., 7-9-1-0; Craft, Bill, 7-5-2-1; 
Crager, Bobby F., 0-7-1-2; Craig, Randy, 0-3-0-0; 
Creasey, Fred, 9-7-0-0; Criniti, Frank, 1-0-0-0; Crum, 
Edward E., 6-3-3-0; Cubbon, George C, 1-0-0-0; 
Cullen, Charles E., 0-1-0-0; Gulp, Willard E., 6-7-1-3; 
Current, Ellis Ray, 4-4-3-0; 

Dahlander, Ward M., 6-8-2-0; Dallman, James W., 
1-9-0-1; Daniel, Ernest H., 3-5-0-0; Davidson, Nor- 
man L., 3-9-0-0; Davis, Clyde E., 2-7-0-0; Davis, 
Webster C, 1-12-1-0; Deaton, Dan, 0-1-0-0; DeMuth, 
Paul E., 5-10-2-0; Denton, Charles, 6-8-1-1; Deutsch, 
T. C, Jr., 1-4-0-0; Dial, Charles R., 0-2-2-0; DiMuzio, 
Robert M., 1-0-0-0; Dixie, Cornelius P., 0-6-0-0; 
Dizney, Alan, 0-0-1-0; Doll, Louis E., 1-3-1-0; Dot- 
son, W. S., 0-3-0-0; Downey, Robert F., 2-0-0-0; 
Drake, Richard R., 7-5-0-0; Duff, Earl, 0-2-1-0; Dun- 
can, James T., 4-4-0-0; Durkin, Jack, 10-3-0-0; 

Edelen, Ben R., 5-10-0-1; Elliott, Carroll L., 11- 
2-3-0; Ellis, Johnny, 0-8-0-2; Elovitz, Carl, 9-9-0-0; 
Ernst, EHward R., 1-4-0-0; 

Fallon, Robert J., 5-6-1-0; Fandrich, William, 8- 
3-0-0; Faust, Jack, 20-15-1-4; Feix, Darl W., 4-5-0-0; 
Ferguson, Thomas L., 0-2-0-0; Fen-ell, Doc, 7-4-0-0; 
Fey, Allen, 5-6-0-1; Fish, Leland G., 7-3-0-0; Fletch- 
er, John L., 3-3-2-2; Florence, Robert H., 8-3-2-0; 



Flowers, Herschel H., 9-9-0-1; Forbes, J. W., Jr., 
11-8-3-2; Fortney, Robert Lee, 3-3-1-2; Foster, Beriy- 
man, 3-6-0-0; Foster, Joe W., 7-8-1-0; Fraley, Bill, 
2-5-1-1; Franklin, James A., 0-2-0-0; Frazer, Tom 
Roe, 1-2-0-1; Freese, Oliver T., 1-0-1-1; Fruit, Wil- 
liam E., 2-8-0-1; Fryrear, William P., 5-7-0-0; 
Fucci, Dom, 3-0-0-0; Fuller, Wilton, 2-4-1-0; Funk- 
houser, Roy A., 7-8-2-3; 

Gammon, William H., 2-0-0-0; Gettler, John F., 
11-6-1-0; Gluszek, Henry, 0-0-0-1; Golden, Billy Joe, 
14-11-3-1; Gour, Bob, 11-15-1-0; Grace, Charles K., 
2-6-2-1; Grace, H. E., Jr., 1-5-0-0; Graham, Jim, 1- 
4^-1; Greene, Paul Dutch, 2-2-0-1; Grieco, Joe, 1-2- 
1-0; Griggs, John M., 14-6-0-0; Gruneisen, Sam J., 
14-9-0-2; 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 10-16-1-0; Haffey, Stan, 
1-2-0-0; Hagan, Joe, 10-8-2-1; Hagerman, Bart, 3-4- 
3-0; Hagy, Harold J., 2-0-0-0; Hall, Dale, 0-1-0-0; 
Hall, Henry N., 5-3-1-0; Hall, Richard T., 0-2-1-0; 
Hanes, Edward C, 9-13-0-0; Harris, Jerry, 2-1-0-0; 
Harris, John C, 9-7-2-2; Harris, Russell, 6-6-0-1; 
Hatfield, Gene E., 5-7-0-0; Hawkins, Robert W., 1- 
12-0-0; Hawkins, Will A., 1-2-0-0; Hedge, David W., 
5-5-2-0; Heinold, F. Thomas, 1-0-0-1; Heinze, Frank, 
21-3-1-0; Heinze, John G., 23-3-0-0; Hellard, George 
D., Jr., 5-6-1-0; Hendon, L. J., 7-3-0-0; Hill, Earl F., 
5-13-0-1; Hicks, Lloyd, 0-2-3-2; Hofstetter, Joe, 2-2- 
0-0; Hogan, Cleo C, Jr., 0-6-3-0; Holbrook, William, 
3-11-2-0; Holeman, D. Fletcher, 6-6-2-1; Hollings- 
worth, Ralph D., 5-2-0-1; Holman, S. T., 5-10-0-0; 
Horton, Aldrich, 0-0-0-1; Howerton, Jack, Jr., 9-9-0- 
0; Huber, Carl W., 4-14-1-0; Hughes, Robert E., 5- 
9-0-0; Huiet, Fred, 2-0-0-0; Hurley, Robert, 0-1-0-0; 
Huston,, Roderick, J., 4-8-0-0; Hynson, Fred R., 10- 
7-1-1; 

Idol, Billy Joe, 11-7-1-0; Idol, Lloyd, Jr., 1-0-0-0; 

Jarrell, Frank W., 2-0-0-0; Jenkins, Kean, 11-4-1 
0; Johnson, Bernard M., 9-4-0-0; Johnson, Harry A., 
Jr., 3-4-2-0; Johnson, Stanley W., 1-8-0-1; Jones, 
George W., 0-1-1-0; Jones, J. Carl, 5-8-4-0; Jones, 
Paul, 1-1-0-0; Jones, William A., 7-1-0-0; Junker, 
Edwin G., 1-1-0-0; 

Kallaher, James E., 1-4-0-0; Kathman, Bernard 
J., 0-3-0-0; Kauffman, Victor C, 10-4-0-3; Kelley, 
Victor B., 6-4-1-1; Kemper, Russ, 4-1-0-0; Kercher, 
Norman L., 7-7-1-0; Kerr, Kenneth, 2-8-0-1; Kessel, 
Harry R., 1-0-0-0; Kimble, Frank, 2-1-1-0; King, 
Allen, 6-5-2-0; Kraesig, Charles F., 5-9-1-3; Kratz- 
enberg, Ralph, 0-1-0-0; 

Lally, James J., 1-2-0-0; Lambert, Irvin, 5-13-0-1; 
Lancaster, Morris B., 5-5-2-1 ; Lange, William E., Jr., 
1-5-2-0; Lankert, Norman E., 0-1-0-0; Lawson, Le- 
land, 1-7-0-0; Leahy, Pat, 0-3-0-0; Lenahan, Thomas 
F., 6-11-0-0; Lewis, Jesse O. D., 2-0-1-0; Lewis, 
Richard Q., Jr., 0-7-0-0; Ley, Robert E., 5-0-1-1; 
Liber, Jim, 0-2-0-0; Liber, Michael, 0-1-0-0; Lingo, 
Henry E., 7-4-0-0; Logan, Eli, 4-1-0-0; Lotz, Robert 
W., 3-5-1-1; Lowe, Eugene T., 8-11-0-0 Lowe, Stan, 
6-10-1-0; Lucas, Gene T., 9-4-1-2; Lucas, T. L., Jr., 
4-4-0-0; Lusby, George H., 3-1-1-0; Lutz, Joseph C, 
7-5-0-0; 

McCarler, Bdbby 4-6-2-1; McCollum, Robert G., 
4-1-0-0; McConachie, Pud, 4-7-0-0; McCowan, Con- 
nell, 6-6-2-1; McDowe'l, A. W., 2-3-0-0; McGehee, 
Gordon, 11-5-0-0; McGlasson, Eugene, 3-5-2-0; Mc- 
Guire, Jack, 0-5-1-0; McHenry, Louis P., 0-7-0-0; 
McKinney, Adelle E., 0-2-0-1; McLaughlin, Robert 
L., 1-0-0-0; McLemore, Jack T., 2-11-0-1; McNamee, 
Jack, 4-3-1-0; McPeek, Talmadge, 1-0-0-0; McQuill- 
ing, Gerald E., 0-1-0-0; 

Magruder. Earl L., Jr., 2-1-0-1; Makepeace, W. 
H., 2-3-0-0; Malcolm, Donald C, 0-2-0-0; Marks, Ed- 
ward W., 3-10-1-3; Marsili, Lee, 3-8-2-0; Matarazzo, 
Salvatore M., 2-1-0-0; Matthews, Billy D., 5-2-0-0; 
Mattingly, Charles C, 1-4-0-1; May, E. B., Jr., 28- 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



0-2-0; Mayhew, William M., 13-3-2-0; Maynard, Joe 
E., 1-3-0-0; Mayo, Henry L., 3-2-0-0; Mays, Ray- 
mond K. 0-0-1-0; Meeks, Jacli, 2-14-5-0; Mercke, 
Frank R., 5-12-3-0; Mickey, Elbert W., 0-4-1-0; Mid- 
dlebrooks, Chuck, 2-6-0-0; Miller, Kenneth H., 12-9- 
2-1; Millerhaus, W. J., 1-4-0-0; Minta, John H., 2- 
4-0-0; Mitchell, Emmett, 6-6-1-0; Mitchell, Vyron 
W., 4-4-0-0; Moellering, Louis H., 2-0-0-0; Moody, 
William R., 2-0-0-0; Morse, Richard K., 10-8-0-4; 
Moss, Howard A., 8-1-0-0; Moss, James W., 8-7-0-1; 
Mordica, William A., 3-3-0-0; Morris, Gene L., 5-0- 
0-0; Morrissey, Rockne, 5-2-0-0; Mouser, H. D., 1- 
17-0-1; Mullins, B. E., 3-2-0-0; Muntan, Peter J., 
5-8-0-0; Murphy, Leo T., Jr., 0-4-1-0; Muirphy, Phil 
J., 0-0-1-0; Murray, Thomas, 6-7-0-0; 

Nassida, Frank R., 5-0-0-0; Neal, Gene, 15-4-0-0; 
Nickell, Carl Duane, 0-1-0-0; Noland, Douglas, 8-7- 
0-0; Nord, Bertrand J., 7-8-0-0; Nord, Ed, 11-10-2-0; 
Nord, Gilbert, 2-10-2-0; 

Omer, Harold G., 4-3-0-1; O'Nan, Norman, 1-5-0 
-0; O'Neal, Bud, 4-9-0-0; Osborne, Ted, 4-8-0-0; 
Owens, Charles C, Jr., 1-0-0-0; 

Palmer, Carl A., 2-0-0-0; Parker, Billy E., 9-6-2-2; 
Parsley, Clyde E., 8-4-1-0; Pate, Lloyd W., 7-3-0-0; 
Peeno, Harry R., 3-2-1-0; Pinson, Eugene, 2-2-0-0; 
Powell, Logan G., 7-6-0-0; Powers, Tom, 0-1-0-0; 
Priode, Len, 1-0-0-0; 

Rapp, J. Lowell, 2-0-0-0; Rapp, William, 0-1-0-0; 
Ray, Shirley G., 2-1-0-0; Ray, William H., 3-3-2-1; 
Reddington, Jim, 6-11-1-0; Reece, Fred, 9-5-0-1; 
Reed, Gordon, 8-2-0-1; Reinhart, Gene, A., 1-0-0-0; 
Renfro, John Edwin, 4-2-1-1; Rentz, Thomas W., 5- 
4-0-0; Rieman, Robert, 0-2-0-0; Riggins, Jason, 2-1- 
0-0; Riggs, William T., 7-7-1-1; Ring, William H., 
1-0-0-0; Robinson, Don L., 2-4-0-0; Rodgers, Tom H., 
8-11-2-1; Roettger, W. H., 6-4-0-0; Rogers, J. B., 1- 
1-0-0; Rolph, Harold J., 3-0-0-0; Ruddle, Guy R., 5- 
11-0-0; Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 13-6-5-0; Russell, C. B., 
Jr., 7-3-2-1; Russell, Gary E., 0-7-1-1; Russman, 
Godfrey F., 5-4-0-0; Russell, Joe, 10-9-1-0; 

Sacra, Gresham, 4-3-2-1; Sanders, Mel, 6-3-0-0; 
Sapp, Edward, 4-8-0-0; Sauter, Harold S., 0-1-0-0; 
Schad, Jim, 0-1-0-0; Scharfenberger, Irv. T., 4-0-1-0; 
Schiering, Jack H., 2-1-2-0; Schlich, Paul, 6-14-2-0; 
Schmitt, K. F., 10-7-0-1; Sehmitt, Paul E., 6-9-2-0; 
Schwetschenau, Paul, 1-6-0-0; Scott, Bill, 6-5-3-0; 
Seale, Frank E., 6-1-1-0; Seale, William E., 5-5-1-1; 
Selbee, William A., 0-4-1-0; Sellman, John B., 6-8-1- 
0; Selvy, Curt, 14-7-0-0; Shanks, Thomas E., 5-6-2-0; 
Shaw, John H., 7-4-0-0; Shaw, Stanley E., 6-1-0-1; 
Sherman, Jerry, 0-1-0-0; Shewmaker, Wayne, 9-6-1- 
0; Showalter, John, 5-2-2-2; Shumate, Roy V., 2-1- 
0-0; Simpson, Felix Delane, 0-0-0-1; Sloan, Wally, 
9-6-2-0; Smith, Edgar J., 16-13-0-2; Sowers, William 
R., Jr., 2-1-0-1; Spencer, H. Edward, 3-1-0-0; 
Stephenson, Harry J., 8-1-0-0; Stevens, William D., 
7-6-0-0; Stofft, William A., 1-0-1-0; Strain, Richard 
P., 4-7-2-1; Staten, Joseph B., 6-2-0-0; Steele, 
Charles, 3-2-5-0; Straight, Roy, 0-1-0-0; Strong, 
Arnett, 7-5-1-0; Sullivan, A. G., 0-0-2-1; Sullivan, 
Don Chris, 6-8-0-0; Swantaok, Stan, 2-5-0-0; Swin- 
ford, John, 7-9-0-0; Swope, William W., 0-1-0-0; 

Tackett, Jay, 4-6-0-1; Talbot, William G., 2-0-0-0; 
Taylor, Dennis H., 6-1-0-0; Thomas, Charles, 5-2-0-0- 
Thomas, Frank M., 0-3-0-0; Thomas, Raymond E., 
5-8-0-0; Thompson, Jack, 26-14-3-0; Thompson, Jack 
F., Jr., 2-0-0-0; Thurman, J. W., 1-1-0-0; Traut- 
wem, Jim, 1-15-0-0; Treas, Joe W., 7-8-0-0; Trout- 
man, Bill, 3-0-0-0; Trunzo, Nick, 3-8-2-0; Tulley, 
William P., 1-0-0-0; Tussey, George, Jr., 2-5-1-0; 

VanHoose, Jack D., 3-2-0-0; Vankirk, Alvia S., 
3-7-0-0; VanMeter, David G., 0-8-0-2; Vaughan, 
Richard, 6-11-1-2; Veneklase, Kenneth H., 1-1-0-1; 
Vennari, Paul, 2-1-0-0; Vennell, Robert, 3-1-1-0; 



Visscher, Robert W., 6-6-1-1; 

Waide, Harry D., 1-9-1-0; Walker, Julian R., 6- 
5-1-0; Walker, Paul R., 4-14-3-2; Waller, Bobbie E., 
2-0-0-0; Wanchic, Nicholas, 8-6-0-2; Warren Ken- 
neth A., 0-7-0-0; Washer, Stanley, 1-5-1-1; Watts, 
Shirley, 15-6-2-0; Weaver, Clyde Ivan, 1-0-0-0; 
Weaver, Ray, 4-1-0-0; Weber, David, 8-9-1-1; Welch, 
Bill, 2-1-2-0; Welch, J. D., 4-9-2-0; Welch, Tom, 7- 
1-0-0; Wermeister, Jack P., 0-1-0-1; White, James, 
5-4-3-1; Wigginton, Al, Sr., 0-1-0-1; WiUey, Harold 
L., 0-3-0-0; Williams, Bert 0., 0-2-0-0; Williams, 
Gene, 11-3-2-0; Williams, Jim, 0-1-0-0; Williams, 
Jerry Ray, 0-1-0-0; Willis, Donald A., 0-9-0-2; Wil- 
son, John Pope, 2-2-0-0; Wilson, Louis 0., 2-5-1-0; 
Wise, Billy V., 15-7-1-0; Wise, Jack, 4-6-1-1; Wo- 
mack, William H., 5-8-0-0; Wyatt, William J., 4-2- 
2-0; 

Yanity, J. B., Jr., 2-0-0-0; 

Zaranka, Benny J., 8-8-1-0; Zimmer, Tom, 2-4- 
2-0. 



Seneca's Defensive Play 

By Bob Mulcahy 
Editor's Note: Given bflow is an outline of the 
material used in one of the talks presented at the 
first annual basketball clinic of the K.H.S.C.A., held 
in Louisville an April 18, 1964. 

I. CHANGING MAN-TO-MAN ZONE 
DEFENSE A. Types of defense: (1) 2-3 
zone, (2) man-to-man line-up as close as 
possible to that of 2-3 zone 

B. Signals used for changing defenses: 
(1) odd and even signals, (2) odd or even 
home or visitors' score, (3) odd or even time 
on clock, minute digit only 

II IMPORTANCE OF BIG MAN IN 
CHANGING DEFENSE 

A. He must be able to cover middle 
zone on both man-to-man zone defense. 

B. Always drive man with ball toward 
the inside. 

C. Drop weak side men off to cover and 
protect the pivot man when he leaves his 
man for other man. 

III. STANCE AND POSITION USED 
TO COVER MAN ON DEFENSE 

A. Use one-foot-forward stance instead 
of lining up straight away. (1) This en- 
ables defensive man to chase offensive man 
when he wants him to go. (2) Play forward 
without ball tight to prevent pass from 
guard. When forward cuts to basket, keep 
eyes on passer not cutter. 

IV. 1-2-2 POSITION ZONE 

A. This defense enables you to spot the 
critical positions, like man-to-man. (1) One 
of two under basket men will cover middle 
when necessary to make same as 1-3-1. (2) 
Two side men can move out front to re- 
semble 3-2 set up. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUAItY, 1964 



Page Nine 




High School Bowling 

In September, 
1963, some four- 
hundred seventy- 
five students in 
Grades 10-12 mov- 
ed into the new 
Hopkinsville Senior 
High School. The 
present $700,000 
structure does not 
inckide a gymnas- 
ium or auditorium 
which is the back- 
ground for this 
article. Chet Redmon 

Without a gym the students of Hopkins- 
ville High School are faced with little op- 
portunity for activity unless they are mem- 
bers of a school athletic team. Although 
about one in every three participates in 
athletics of some type, this does not begin 
to provide opportunities inclusive for all 
students. 

An activity that has come to be very 
popular is bowling. A local bowling estab- 
lishment provided for a five-week instruc- 
tion period during which time they sent a 
bus each Monday and Friday to pick up the 
interested students from the study halls. 
Following the instructional period which 
was free for all who took part, the director 
of the lanes organized a student league 
which continues each Monday and Friday. 
Standings of the league are posted in a 
prominent place at the school for partici- 
pants and others to see. 

The transportation responsibility is 
borne by the bowling establishment which 
has a bus insured to carry the student 
bowlers. The program is carried on with 
the approval and consent of the superin- 
tendent and Board of Education. Approxi- 
mately 125 students are taking part, many 
of whom have engaged in no other athletic 
or recreational activities. Preliminary study 
has also shown that there has been no loss 
to any students academically. On the con- 
trary, some have actually improved which 
gives some reason to believe that this op- 
portunity has provided an incentive to do 
better. Students who have unsatisfactory 
academic standing are not permitted to par- 
ticipate, because of the fact that they would 
lose valuable study time. 

Pending state legislation will, if passed, 
provide the city of Hopkinsville the op- 
portunity to add some valuable physical 
education facilities, but it seems very like- 



ly now that the bowling league will continue 
as long as there is (mutual interest) be- 
tween lanes operator and school officials 
and enough students who desire to par- 
ticipate. 

— Prin. Chet Redmon 
Hopkinsville High School 



State Wrestling Tournament 

The first K.H.S.A.A. State Wrestling 
Tournament will be held at the Seneca High 
School gymnasium, Louisville, on February 
14-15, 1964. The Friday evening session 
will be held at 7:30, and the Saturday ses- 
sions will be held at 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 
p.m. State Wrestling Committee Chairman 
Orville Williams, wrestling coach at Seneca, 
will manage the tournament. Other mem- 
bers of the committee are Coach Will D. 
Evans of the Kentucky School for the 
Blind, and Brother Leopold, wrestling coach 
at the St. Joseph Prep School. 

Tournament Manager Williams, in a 
letter to principals and coaches who have 
indicated that they will send wrestling 
teams to the tournament, gives the follow- 
ing information and requirements: 

1. Weigh in will be at 6:00 p.m. Friday 
evening the 14th. There will be only one 
weigh-in. If a participant should be a frac- 
tion of a pound over his weight at weigh-in 
time, he will be allowed a reasonable amount 
of time (15 to 20 minutes) to get dovm to 
his weight. The participant must meet his 
weight requirement or forfeit his place in 
the tournament. 

2. There will be NO entrance fee this 
year! 

3. Seeding of brackets will be held im- 
mediately following weigh-in Friday. All 
coaches must attend this meeting. 

4. All teams must send to me by Feb- 
ruary 3rd a K.H.S.A.A. ehgibilitv sheet, in 
duplicate, containing the participants and 
any alternates that will be in the tourna- 
ment. 

S.The K.H.S.A.A. will reimburse the 
participating teams i/^ of their cost of 
travel expenses, lodging, and meals. Please 
keep receipts of your expenses. 

6. First, Second, and Third place medals 
will be presented to the winners in each 
weight class. Trophies will be awarded to 
the Championship team, the runner up and 
the outstanding tournament wrestler. 

7. Meals will not be served at Seneca. 
It will be the responsibility of each coach 
to provide for his team in this matter. 
Seneca is located close to several eating 
establishments. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



8. Admission to each session will be 50c 
to the public. A $1.00 tournament ticket 
will be on sale which will admit the pur- 
chaser to all three sessions at a savings of 
50c. The three sessions will be Friday Feb. 
14, at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 15th at 
1:00, and 8:00 p.m. These tickets will be 
on sale at the door. 

9. I wish that you would please acknow- 
ledge immediately, the receiving of this 
letter, and let me know if you intend to 
participate in the tournament. Along with 
this acknowledgment, would you please send 
the following: 

a. Your school colors 

b. Your team nickname 

c. A copy in any form of your school 
emblem 

10. Any complaints or disagreements 
will be taken to the tournament manager, 
and after conference, his decision will be 
final. 

11. If you have any questions, feel free 
to get in touch with me at any time, here 
at Seneca, Gl-1-4330 or my home WO-9- 
0196. Please send all correspondance to 
Orville Williams, Seneca High School, 3510 
Goldsmith Lane, Louisville 20, Kentucky. 
We hope you will be able to participate and 
are looking forward to seeing you and your 
team here on the 14th and 15th. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 
vrri-iJ nos'^'i' ';• '"p two or three ties in the 
district basketball tournament balloting 
which was to end at midnight, January 
25. Gran C. Teater moved, seconded by 
Foster J. Sanders, that the Commissioner 
be given authority to break any ties in the 
district tournament balloting. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read letters of ap- 
preciation from Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary-Treasurer of the Kentucky 
Association of Pep Organization Sponsors 
and from Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr of 
the Kentucky High School Coaches As- 
sociation for the grants made to these 
organizations by the Board of Control in 
its 1963-64 budget. 

The Commissioner reported that he had 
suspended the Douglass Hiigh School of 
Henderson from the K.H.S.A.A. for a period 
of two weeks, beginning January 5, 1964, 
after he had been notified by Prin. H. B. 
Kirkwood of Douglass that a basketball 
player Tyrone Chapman, had been allowed 
to represent the Douglass High School in 
three basketball games during the current 
season when the boy was not eligible under 



the provisions of the Association's Resi- 
dence Rule. The Commissioner stated that 
the suspension was mandatory under K. H. 
S.A.A. regulations. Two of the three games 
mentioned were won by Douglass. These 
games, played with teams representing St. 
Vincent Academy and Paducah Lincoln 
High School, were declared forfeited. 

There was a discussion of possible new 
football playoff regulations for the seasons 
of 1965 and 1966. President Richard L 
Greenwell of the Kentucky High School 
Football Coaches Association appeared be- 
fore the Board at this time upon invitation 
by the Commissioner and members of the 
Board of Control to explain the position 
of his group with respect to current foot- 
ball regulations. Some of the problems in- 
volved in anv possible drastic change in 
the present football regulations were dis- 
cussed at length. No action on proposed 
changes in the regulations had been con- 
templated for this meeting. Members of 
the group agreed to continue their delibera- 
tions at a later date in an effort to improve 
K.H.S.A.A. football playoff regulations. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Don R. Rawlings, that all bills of the As- 
sociation for the period beginning Decem- 
ber 21, 1968, and ending January 24, 1964, 
be allowed. The motion was carried unan- 
imously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



WRESTLING QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 

13. Situation: W^hen the West Point ride is being 
used, what determining factors or time limit does 
the official use in calling this locked hands or a 
pinning hold? 

Ruling: The offensive wrestler is allowed reaction 
time when attempting to use the West Point ride as 
a pinning situation. Once he attempts to break 
the defensive wrestler down and turn his shoulders 
toward the mat, and is unable to do so immediately, 
he would be called for locked hands around the body. 
Normally the officials will give reaction time, but 
in no case should this ride be used as a conti'olling 
ride with the hands locked. 

14. Situation: "B" stands up and attempts to 
escape by pulling hands of "A" apart, and both 
contestants stumble off the mat. When should "B" 
get credit for an escape? 

Ruling: "B" should receive credit for an escape 
if the supporting points of either wrestler are on 
the mat when "A" loses control and "B" is in a 
neutral position. 

15. Situation: "B" applies the Granby roll to 
"A". When will the advantage change, and will 
the situation allow for a predicament or near-fall 
situation? 

Ruling: The Granby roll is used extensively in 
the eastern states. When "B"' has the hold locked 
tig!htly, and to the extent that "A" is concerned 
about being pinned, the advantage changes and then 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



Page Eleven 



near-falls or predicament points can be scored or 
tlie underneath wrestler may get pinned. 

16. Situation: "A" grasps both legs of "B" while 
"A" is in the advantage position on the mat. Should 
the referee blow the whistle and stop the match 
and award points for a technical violation, or 
should he give a warning for stalling? 

Ruling: This is considered stalling, and, if 'A" 
has not previously been warned for stalling during 
the match, he should be warned on his first viola- 
tion. 

17. Situation: "A" deliberately releases "B", but 
the referee does not award points for an escape 
until "A" has walked in front of and faced "B" at 
arm's length distance. Is this the correct procedure 
for the official ? 

Ruling: Yes, if the referee did not wait until 
the above maneuvers were completed, "A" might 
score 2 points for a takedown before "B" had been 
given reaction time for a definite escape. 

18. Situation: "A" uses legal double ai-m bar 
to take opponent down. After takedown, "A" locks 
hands in the double arm bar and earns near^pin 
points. "B" bridges and almost ends situation, but 
"A" releases locked hands and brings "B" back to 
the mat and locks double arm bar in an attempt to 
pin. May "A" earn near-pin points both times? 

Ruling: No. If "A" uses a legal double arm bar 
for a takedown, and after the official has awara°u 
takedown points, "A" locks his hands in the doiib»:i 
arm bar which is permissible, "A" may earn near- 
pin points. Even though "A" releases the locked 
hands and brings "B" down again and locks his 
hands in a double arm bar in a pin, he cannot earn 
additional near-pin points. 

19. Situation: "A" has "B" in near-fall situation 
for fifteen seconds. During the attempt to escape, 
"B" twists reverse half nelson into choke hold. What 
should the referee do? 

Ruling: If 'A" had "B" in near-fall for fifteen 
seconds prior to the reverse half nelson developing 
into a choke hold, the referee should have awarded 
"A" three pin points as well as one point to "B" 
for an illegal hold. If the choke hold actually were 
the responsibility of the wrestler "B", "B" would 
not be awarded a point for an illegal hold. 

20. Situation: If the defensive wrestler has one 
knee on the mat and the offensive wrestler inter- 
locks ihis hands around the waist, is this considered 
to be a technical violation? 

Ruling: Yes, because the rules rstate you may 
lock your hands around the defensive man only 
when the defensive wrestler has gained his feet. 
A defensive wrestler with one knee on the mat is 
not considered to be on his feet. Note: Locked hands 
are permitted in a pinning situation. 
DEFINITIONS 

21. Overlapping of hands: Overlapping shall be 
considered to be interlocking for all intersciholastic 
rules interpretations. 

22. Full nelson: If both hands are on the head, 
even though not interlocked or overlapped, it shall 
be considered a full nelson and is illegal. The re- 
feree is urged to prevent an illegal hold rather than 
call it. 

23. Default: A contestant who is injured in a 
match and does not appear for his following matdh 
because he apparently feels he will lose, will not be 
permitted to wrestle for third place. If a contestant 
does not dress and appear on the mat for a match 
it is considered a forfeit, and, therefore, he is not 
eligible for third place competition. A default may 
be awarded when a wrestler has actually participated 
and is unable to complete the match. 



Weight Lifting and Wrestling 

The purpose of this article is twofold: 
first, to help develop weight lifting and 
wrestling as competitive sports in our 
secondary schools and colleges; and second, 
to develop better football players by urging 
them to participate in these two sports 
competitively during the off season. 

Football is one of the two top sports 
played in Kentucky's High Schools and Col- 
leges. Nevertheless, it has far to go to 
catch up with the winning brand of football 
played in other states. This is proven by 
the recruiting program carried on by our 
colleges in going to other states, particular- 
ly Ohio and Pennsylvania, for football mat- 
erial. 

Ohio and Pennsylvania would, of course, 
have more football players than Kentucky 
because of a much greater population, but 
Kentucky has long been a top producer of 
basketball material, and we thus often ask 
ourselves the question, "Why do we not 
produce adequate football players to supply 
our own colleges?" 

The fault does not lie within the Ken- 
tucky player nor are the genes for passing 
on hereditary traits in football players bet- 
ter found in such geographical areas as the 
two states of Ohio and Pennsylvania. The 
fault must be located in the leadership of 
our athletic program in the schools and 
colleges of Kentucky. 

Plato once said, "The glory of man is 
his strength." What sports display the 
glory of man more accurately than the two 
competitive sports of weight lifting and 
wrestling; and furthermore, what two 
sports could better condition a football 
player in off season or develop his strength, 
power, and even size to near maximum 
potentials than these two sports. 

No sports will develop the strength, the 
power, or the body of an athlete like weight 
lifting, and for complete physical fitness, 
wrestling has been proven to be one of the 
best activities. 

Kentucky has few schools which boast 
wrestling teams, and weight lifting contests 
are practically unheard of outside of Louis- 
ville. Few physical educators even know 
official A.A.U. rules for conducting such 
events. 

In lifting weights the athlete should 
strive for the development of superior 
strength for his bodvweight. An example 
would be to press his bodyweight, a feat 
which only one in 170,000 has been esti- 
mated as being capable of doing. This can 
be achieved by every football player through 



Page TirelTe 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1964 



WATCH FOR THE 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUR 



1964-65 COVERAGES 



*7<4e Ki*t(fde4€ Qo4ft/jia4Uf, 



W. E. lONGSLEY 



121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE 
P.O. BOX 7116 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 255-0835 



hard training. Other goals in various lifts 
would be to bench press fifty pounds above 
bodyweight, curl fifty pounds under body- 
weight, squat with fifty pounds over body 
weight, and deadlift two hundred pounds 
over bodyweight. 

Imagine fielding a team that could do 
this. The psychological effect alone would 
be enough to win. This is entirely within 
the reach of every coach if he works with 
bi« f^f^am. Remember, few of your players 
will have superior strength, and many times 
the coach is disillusioned to believe a player 
is strong when the player's own great size 
gives that false impression. Work for super- 
ior strength, and the teaching of the three 
Olympic lifts can follow for later competi- 
tion. 

Wrestling, one of the oldest sports, 
provides a fine mental tonic towards develop- 
ment of an agressive attitude. This type of 
attitude is greatly needed by the football 
player on the field of action. Wrestling will 
build tremendous physical efficiency, co- 



ordination, poise and effective use of the 
body. The development of the winning 
spirit in wrestling invades the mind and 
the wrestler realizes that he can "take 
care of himself" in any sort of physical 
encounter, especially on the football field. 

Japanese Sumo Wrestling Rules could 
be of special use in developing linemen. 
This is when you have a fifteen foot ring 
and the winner is declared when he either 
throws the opponent or pushes him out of 
the ring. 

Football is only played approximately 
four months out of the year, including 
spring practice, and thus much time could 
be devoted to these individual sports. Team 
sports are so greatly emphasized that there 
has been a neglecting of individual sports 
in this state. 

If Kentucky is to develop top athletes, 
it must give its athletes a more diversified 
program in athletics. These programs must 
be started in at least secondary school 
level, and extend on through college in 
order to succeed. 

— Richard G. Layman 
Louisville Y.M.C.A. 



We have ample supplies 
for fast deliveries for your last 
minute BASKETBALL needs. 



Our representatives will call at 
your school with the 1 964 spring and 
summer lines of athletic equipment 
as well as our football and basketball 
lines. 



i5UTCLIFEE CO. 

LOUISVILLE I, KENTUCKY 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL STATE 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

March 18 thru March 21, 1964 

While in Lexington for the State Basketball Tourna- 
ment, make our room at the Phoenix Hotel your head- 
quarters, for it is the meeting place for players, coaches 
and basketball fans. Our factory representatives, to- 
g-ether with our school representatives, Roy J. Boyd, 
Jim Mitchell, Ed Hendley, and C. A. Byrn, Jr. will be 
on hand to make your visit in our room a pleasant one. 

We will have on display our new 1964 Spring and 
Summer samples, as well as an advance showing on 
football and basketball supplies for the coming 1964- 
65 season. We would recommend that you be ready to 
place your order so that there will be no delay from 
the standpoint of delivery. 

Our Spring and Summer catalog was mailed a few 
weeks ago. If you failed to receive your copy, write us 
and we will gladly send you another. 

Remember-two of the basketballs to be used in the 
State Tournament can be secured from us; namely the 
Coach Adolph Rupp No. AFR official ball and the No. 
ARX official LastBilt basketball. Both of these balls 
carry the signature of Coach Adolph Rupp and are 
used by the University of Kentucky Wildcats. Let us 
ship you these basketballs, so that you will have the 
feel of the ball to be used in the State Tournament. 

For those last minute needs for tournament and for 
the last few games before tournament time, please 
let us assist you. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 





HlqhkhoolAthMe 



AHRENS TRADE SCHOOL WRESTLING TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION-1964 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ron Jones, James Canamore, William Booth, Robert Moore, 
Tony Abell. Second Row: Dohn Johnson, Bill Zeigler, James Knight, Don Clark, Ron 
Elliott, Luther Graham, Jr., Third Row: Head Coach Martin Klotz, Ass't Coach Jim 
Cann, Rocky Meier, Danny Wooldridge, Mgr. Ken Goosey, Ass't Coach Karl Lang. 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

March, 1964 



Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Friday night; 

For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 

And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail. 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead. — 
In this happy Madness of March ! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1964 



.00 Per Year 



THREE PHILOSOPHIES 

Editor's Note: The following address, given by 
the Reverend Doctor R. Jack Robinson at an Annual 
Basketball Coaches Clinic in Ohio, appeared in a 
recent issue of "The Ohio High School Athlete." Its 
message is timely. 

My subject is, "Three Philosophies — 
Take Your Pick !" 

In a subject like this, of course, the 
limiting word is "philosophy." The English 
word "philosophy" comes from two Greek 
words: "philo," which means to love, and 
"sophia," which means wisdom. So a basic 
definition of "philosophy" would be "the 
love of wisdom." 

Webster speaks of philosophy as the 
science which investigates the facts of 
reality. Plato called philosophy "that dear 
delight," and Leonardo da Vinci referred 
to it as "the noblest of all pleasures." 

You are aware that the field of philoso- 
phy is divided into five parts : logic, aesthe- 
tics, ethics, politics, and metaphysics. Then 
the philosopher breaks these divisions down. 
For example, the study of metaphysics is 
divided hke this: first, the real and final 
nature of matter which is called ontology; 
second, the real and final nature of the mind 
which is called philosophical psychology; 
and, third, the interrelation of mind and 
matter in the process of perception and 
knowledge which is known as epistemology. 

Now, whether all of this is meaningful 
to us may be debatable, but that every per- 
son in this room and on this earth is con- 
stantly being molded by some philosophy or 
system of thought is not debatable. And 
nowhere is this more evident than in the 
lives of the philosophers themselves. 

Take the first great occidental philoso- 
pher, Socrates. He was far from handsome. 
Socrates had a bald head, a great round 
face, deepset staring eyes, and a broad nose. 
His disciples liked him because of the mod- 
esty of his wisdom. He did not claim to have 
all wisdom, only to seek it lovingly. He was 
wisdom's amateur, not her professional. 

Socrates held that philosophy begins 
when one learns to doubt and question. His 
motto was, "Know Thyself." 

But woe be to the teacher who tries to 



teach men or their sons faster than they 
can learn. 

You remember that the city elders of 
Athens could not stand the incisive gaze of 
Socrates upon them. They decreed that 
Socrates must drink the hemlock. His 
friends came to Socrates while he was in 
prison. They stated that they had bribed 
the prison officials and that they stood by 
with a boat and would take him out to one 
of the islands in the Aegean Sea. There he 
could live out the course of his life nor- 
mally. 

Boldly Socrates refused, declaring, "Be 
of good cheer and say that you are burying 
my body only. I believe in one God and hope 
in my modest way that death will not des- 
troy me." 

Now contrast such a man as that with 
another philosopher, the German philoso- 
pher Friedrich Nietzsche. Born into a min- 
ister's family, at eighteen Nietzsche lost 
faith in the God of his fathers and spent 
the remainder of his life looking for a new 
deity. 

At the age of twenty-three Friedrich 
Nietzsche was conscripted into military 
service. At Frankfurt, on his way to the 
front, he saw a troop of cavalry pass with 
magnificent clatter and display through the 
town. Then and there, Nietzsche later said, 
the perception came out of which was to 
grow his entire system of thought. 

Listen: "I felt for the first time that the 
strongest and highest will to live does not 
find expression in the miserable struggle 
for existence, but in a will to war, a will 
to power, a will to overpower." 

At twenty-five Nietzsche was appointed 
to the Chair of Classical Philology at the 
University of Basel. There he taught a way 
of life that said, "Just as morality lies not 
in kindness but in strength, so the goal of 
human effort should be not the elevation of 
all but the development of finer and strong- 
er individuals; not mankind, but superman 
is the goal." 

And what end came of a man like that? 

Nietzsche filled his last book, "Ecce Homo" 

with self praise. He turned on the friends 

of his earlier years. He bitterly attacked 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1964 



Published moRthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Hiirh School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Tester (1960-64). Paintsyille 

Directors — Don Dayis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville: 
Preston Holland (1961-65): Murray: Don R. RawJIings (1961-65). 
Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville.' 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



ZX>iom ike Commissioned s CJffi 



tee 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1963-64 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



BOARD ELECTION 

At the copy (ieaiJline for this issue of 
the ATHLETE, principals in Sections 7 and 
8 were still balloting for Board of Control 
membership. There were four candidates in 
Section 7. They were: Prin. Morton Combs, 
Carr Creek High School; Prin. Clinton B. 
Hammons, Knox Central High School; Supt. 
Sam Potter, Lynch City Schools; and Prin. 
James A. Pursifull, Bell County High 
School. Supt. Oran C. Teater, Paintsville 
City Schools, was unopposed for re-election 
in Section 8. 

SPRING MEETS 

Tentative dates have be3n set for the various 
spring meets and tournaments in rifle marksman- 
ship, baseball, golf, track and tennis. They are as 
follows : 

April 25, State Rifle Championship, Lexington 

May 11-14, district baseball tournaments (list- 
ing given below) 

May 15-16, regional track meets (Murray, Hen- 
derson County, Bowling Green, Fort Knox, Jef- 
ferson County, Louisville, Bellevue, Lexington, Rich- 
mond, Barboui-ville, Pi'estor,,sburg', Ashland) 

May 22-23, regions 1 tennis tournaments for girls 
(Murray, Bowling Green, Louisville, Jefferson County, 
Bellevue, Lexir.gton) 

May 22-23, State Track Meet, Lexington 

May 23, regional golf tournaments (Princeton, 
Bowling Green, Jefferson County, Louisville, Coving- 
ton, Lexington, London, Paintsville) 

May 29-30, regional b?seball tournaments (Mur- 
ray, Owensboio, Brownsville, Louisville, Newport, 
Lexington, Harlan, Ashland) 

May 29-30, regional tennis tournamenits for boys 
(Bowling Green, Fort Knox, West Jefferson County, 
East Jefferson County, Louisville, Bellevue, Lexing- 
ton, Richmond) 

June 2-3, State Golf Toum'iment, Fort Knox 

June 5-6, State Tennis Tournament for Girls, 
Louisville 



June 10-11, State Baseball Tournament, Lexington 

June 12-13, State Tennis Tournament for Boys, 
Louisville 

In assigning schools to districts and regions for 
spring meets, the source of information is the blue 
statement form filed by the school principal when 
he enrolls his school in the Association. If a coach 
is listed for a sport, it is assumed that the school 
sponsors a team in that sport. In some instances the 
coach of a particular sport may not have been as- 
signed at the time the .statement form was filed, and 
in other instances the principal may have decided that 
a sport for which a coach was named will not be 
sponsored by the school this year. 

Principals should study the assignment of schools 
by districts ard regions which appears below to 
determine whether or not the listings for their 
schools are correct. The State Office should be 
notified only if the name of the school .should be 
added to or omitted from any of the lists given. 
RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP 

Bryan Station, Danville, Her.ary Clay, K.M.I.., 
Male, M.M.I., Oldham County, Owensboro, Paul G. 
Blazer, Rowan County, iSt. Joseph Prep. (Bardstown), 
Western (Sinai) 

TENNIS FOR GIRLS 

Murray Region — Attucks, Henderson, Hopkins- 
ville. Ft. Campbell, Murrav, Morganfield 

Louisville Region — Male, Presentation, Sacred 
Heart 

Bellevue Reg'ion^ — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Dayton, Highlands, Lloyd 

Bowling Gree:: Region — Bowling Green, Cavema, 
Greensburg, LaRue County, Memori'^] (Hardyville), 
Ovvensboro, Taylor County, WaiTen County 

Jefferson County Region — Butler, Durrett, Eastern, 
Fairdale, Waggerier 

Lexington Region — Ashland, Breckniridge Train- 
ing, Franklin County, Hazel Green, Russell, Somer- 
set, U.oiversity. 

TENNIS FOR BOYS 

Bowling Green Region — Attucks, Bowling Green, 
C-^verna, Franklin-Simpson, His-h Street, Madisonville, 
Memorial (Hardyville), Warren County 

West Jefferson Region — Biittler Fairdale. Plea- 
sure Ridge Park, Southern, Valley, Western, Thomas 
Jefferson 

Louisville Regioni — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
Fl?get, Male, Shawnee, St. Xav'er 

Fort Krox Region — Fort Knox, Greensburg, Hen- 
derson County, La Rue County, Morganfield, Owens- 
boro, St. Joseph (Bardstown) 

East Jefferson Region — Burrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Kertuckv M-Htprv Inst., Louisville Country 
Day, Senpca, Trinity, Waggener 

Lexingrton Region — FrarkMn County, Lafayette, 
Georgetown, Han-odsburg, Henry Clay, Millersburg 
Military Lost.. Shelbyville, Universitv 

Bellevue Region — "eechwood. Bellevue, Boone 
County, Covington Cathol'c, Highlands, Holmes, 
Llovd, Newport, Newport Catholic 

Richmon(i Region — Ashland, Foundation, Hazel 
Green, Harlan, Somerset 

BASEBALL 
Murray Region 

Christian County District — Attucte, Christian 
County, Dawson Springs, Fort Campbell, Hopkins- 
ville, Trigg County 

Murray District — ^Benton, Callaway County, Mur- 
ray, Murray College, North Marsh" 11, South Mar- 
shall 

Paducah District — ^Ball^rd Memorial, Heath, Lone 
Oak, Reidl-nd, St. John, Tilgthman 

Mayfield District — Carlisle County, Fancy Farm, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



Page Three 



Fulton, Fulton County, Hickman County, Lowes, May- 
field, Wingo 

Caldwell County District — Caldwell County, Crit- 
tenden County, Livingston Certral, Lyon County 
Owensboro Region 

Henderson County District — Henderson, Hender- 
son County, Holy Name, Morganfield, St. Vincent, 
Sturgis 

Irvington District — Breckinridge County, Hancock 
County, Irvington, Meade County 

Hartford District — Beavar Dam, Calhoun, Cen- 
tertown, Fordsville, Hartford, Livermore, Sacramen- 
to 

Daviess County District — Dsviess County, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic, St. Mai-y-of-the-Woods 

Madisonville District — Earlington, Madisonville, 
Providence, Rosenwaid (Madisonville), South Hopkins, 
West Hopkins 

Central City District — Bremen, Central City, 
Drakesboro, Or-' ham, Greenville, Hughes-Kirk, Muh- 
lenberg Central 

Bowling Green Region 

Bowling Green District — Alvaton, Bowling Green, 
Bristow, Frar.klin Simpson, High Street, Lincoln 
(Franklin), North Warren, St. Joseph (Bowling 
Green), Warren County 

Auburn District — Adairville, Auburn, Le%visburg, 
Ruasellville, Todd County, Todd County Training 

Glasgow District — Allen County, Austin Tracy, 
Clinton County, Cumberland County, Gamaliel, Hise- 
ville, Metcalfe County, Park City, Scottsville, Temple 
Hili, Tompkinsville 

Cavema District Civer-a. Cub Pun, LaRue County, 
Memorial (Hardyville), Munfordville 

Edmonson County District — Butler County, Caney- 
ville, Cl?rkson, Edmonson County, Leitchfield 

Cambellsville District — Adair County, Campbells - 
ville. Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. Charles, 
St. Francis, Taylor County 

St. Joseph District — ^Bardstown, Bloomfield, Fre- 
dericktown, Maekville, Mt. Washington, St. Joseph 
(Bardstown), Shepherdsville, Springfield 

North Hardin District — East Hardin, Elizabeth- 
town, Eliz3bethtown Catholic. Fort Knox, North Har- 
din, West Hardin 

Louisville Region 

St. Xavier District — Central, Flaget, Shawnee, 
St. Xavier 

Southern District — Durrett, Fern Creek, Louis- 
ville Country Day, Seneca, Southern, Thomas Jef- 
ferson 

DeSales District — Atherton, DeSales, Male, Man- 
ual 

Trinity District — Aauinas, Eastern, Kentucky 
Military Inst., Trinity. Waggener, Westport 

VsHey District — Bishop Tavid, Butler, Fairdale, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Valley, Western 
Newport Reg'on 

St. Henry District — Boone County, Dixie Heights, 
Lloyd, St. Henry, Simon Kenton 

Ludlow District — Beechwood, Covington Catholic, 
Holm-js, Holy Cross, Ludlow 

Silver Grove District — Bishop Brossart, Campbell 
County, Highlands, Silver Grove, St. Thomas 

Pendleton Countv Distr'ct — Fal^ionth. Grant 
County, Pendleton, Walton-Verona, Williamstown 

Newport District — Bellevue, Dayton, Newport, 
Newport Catholic 

Maysville District — Bracken County, Fleming 
County, Lewis County, Mason County, Maysvilte, 
Tolles'boro 

Lexington Region 

Versailles District — Anderson, Frankfort. Frank- 
lin County, Georgetown, Scott Coimty, Woodford 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 




Dr. William W. Slider 

Speaker at the forthcoming Dinner Meet- 
ing of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association, scheduled to be held in the 
Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, Lou- 
isville, on Thursday evening April 9, 1964, 
will be Dr. William W. "Bill" Slider, Minis- 
ter of Christ Methodist Church, Louisville. 

Dr. Slider has attained national recogni- 
tion as an accomplished speaker. He holds 
graduate degrees in History, Political Sci- 
ence, and Theology. He has received awards 
for civic work from the states of Kentucky, 
Arkansas and Texas. His speaking engage- 
ments for the current year include twenty 
states. He has spoken before University 
groups, service clubs, religious groups of all 
faiths, and charitable organizations. 

Currently Dr. Slider is serving on boards 
of directors or trustees of the School for 
Handicapped Children, the American Can- 
cer Society, U. of L. Associates, Kentucky 
Wesleyan College, Y.M.C.A., Mayor's Com- 
mittee on Religious Affairs, and the Urban 
Renewal Advisory Committee. 

County 

P?ris District — Bourbon County, Harrison County, 
Millersiburg Military Inst., Nicholas County. Paris 

Lancaster District — Boyle County. Buckeye. Camp 
Dick Robinson, Danville. Harrodsburg, Jessanune 
County, Lancaster, Mercer Countv, P'int Lick 

Shelbyville District — Lincoln Institute, Oldham 
Countv, Shelby County. Shelbyville, Taylorsville 

Liberty District — Brodhe'd. Liberty, McKinney, 
Memorial (Waynesburg) . Mt. Vernon, Stanford 

Eminence District — Oarrollton, Eminence, Galla- 
tin County, Henry County, Owen County, Trimble 
County 

Lexinigton District — Bry"n S+ation, Henry Clay, 
Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, University 

Richmond District — Berea. Estill County, Irvine, 
Madison, Madison Central, Model 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



Harlan Region 

Somerset District — Burnside, Eubank, Ferguson, 
McCreary County, Monticello, Nancy, Pulaski County, 
Pine Knot, Russell County, Somerset, Wayne County 

Lee County District — Clay County, Jackson, Lee 
County, McKee, Ows'ley County, Powell County, 
Riverside Christian, Wolfe County 

Harlan Districts— Cumberland, East Main, Evarts, 
Harlan, Loyall 

Elkhorn City District— Belfry, Dorton, Elkliom 
City, Fleming-Neon, Jenkins, John Creek, Phelps, 
Pikeville, Virgie 

Hazel Green District — Bush, Hazel Green, Lily, 
London 

Middlesboro District — ^Bell County, Henderson 
Settlement, Lone Jack, Middlesboro, Red Bird, Whit- 
ley County 

M. C. Napier District — Buckhom, Dilce Combs, 
Hazard, Hindman, Leatherwood, Leslie County, Let- 
cher, M. C. Napier, Whitesburg 

Ashland Region 

AsWand District — Ashland, Boyd County, Cat- 
lettsburg, Faii-view, Louisa 

South Portsmouth District — Greenup, McKell, 
Raceland, Russell, South Portsmouth, Wurtland 

Camargo District — Bath County, Camargo. Chrk 
County, DuBois, Montgomery Courty, Mt. Sterling 

Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, Hitch- 
ins, Menifee County, Olive Hill, Prichard, Rowan 
County 

Pair.itsville District — Blaine, Ezel, Inez, Me''de 
Memorial, Morgan County, Oil Springs, Paintsville, 
Van Lear 

McDowell District — McDowell, Martin, Maytown, 
Prestonsburg, Wheelwright 

TRACK 

Murray Region — Attucks, Ballard Memorial, Cald- 
well Co., Calloway Co., Christian County, Fulton, 
Ft. Campbell, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Murray, Mur- 
ray College, North Marshall, Tilghman, Trigg County 

Henderson County Region — Calhoun, Crittenden 
County, Daviess County, Douglass (Henderson), 
Hancock County, Henderson, Henderson County, 
Madisonville, Morganfield, Owensboro, Owensboro 
Catholic, Providence, Sturgis, Webster County 

Bowling Green Region — Alvaton, Austin-Tracy, 
Bowling Green, Bristow, Butler County, Cavema, 
Edmonson County, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, 
•Gamaliel, Greenville, High Street, Hiseville, Lincoln 
(Franklin), Metcalfe County, Russellville, Temple 
Jlill, Tompkinsville, Warren County 

Fort Knox Region — Bardstown, Bloomfield, Breck- 
inridge County, Campbellsville, Caneyville, Clark- 
son, East Hardin, Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, Gray- 
son Co. Catholic, Greensburg, Irvington, LaRue 
County, Lebanon, Leitchfield, Meade County, Mt. 
Washington, North Hardin, Old Kentucky Home, St. 
Catherine (New Haven), St. Joseph (Bardstown), 
Taylor County 

Jefferson County Region — Aquinas, Bishop David, 
Butler, Durrett, Eastern, Fairdale, Fern Creek, K. 
M. I., Louisville Country Day, Oldham County, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Seneca, Southern, Thomas Jef- 
ferson, Trinity, Valley, Waggener, Western, West- 
port 

Louisville Recrion — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee 

Bpllevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Campbell County, Covington Catholic, Dixie 
Heights, Grant County, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, 
Ludlow, Maysville, Newport, Newport Catholic, 
Simon-Kenton, Trimble County, Walton-Verona 



Lexington Region — Anderson, Bourbon County, 
Bryan Station, Dunbar, Frankfort, Franklin County, 
Georgetown, Good Shepherd, HaiTison County, 
Henry Clay, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, Millers- 
burg- Military Inst., Nicholas County, Paris, Scott 
County, Shelby County, Shelbyville, University, 
Woodford County 

Richmond Region — Bate, Boyle County, Buckeye, 
Clark County, Danville, Foundation, Harrodsburg, 
Jessamine County, Madison, Madison Centi'al, Mont- 
gomery Co., Mt. Sterling, Pulaski County, Shopville, 
Somerset, Springfield, Wolfe County 

Prestonsburg Region — Belfry, Dunham, Elkhorn 
City, Feds Creek, Fleming-Neon, Hazard, Jenkins, 
John's Creek, Martin, M. C. Napier, Mullins, Paints- 
ville, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, Virgie, Whitesburg 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Bell County, 
Bush, Clay County, Cumberland, Evarts, Hall, Har- 
lan, Hazel Green, Knox Central, Lily, London, Lynn 
Camp, McCreary County, Middlesboro, Pineville, 
Wallins, Whitley County, W'lliamsburg 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Catletts- 
burg, Flat Gap, Fleming County, Louisa, Oil Springs, 
Raceland, Russell, Wurtland 

GOLF 

Princeton Region — Benton, Caldwell County, Da- 
viess County, Fulton, Fort Campbell, Greenville, 
Henderson, Henderson County, Hopkinsville, May- 
field, Madisonville, Murray, North Marshall, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic, Providence 

Rowling Green Region — Adair County, Bowling 
Green, Campbellsville, Elizabethtown, Fort Knox, 
Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, Greensburg, Hartford, 
Higft Street, LaRue County, North Hardin, St. 
Joseph (Bardstown), Scottsville, Tompkinsville, War- 
ren County 

Louisville Region — Atherton, DeSales, duPont 
Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee 

Jefferson County Region — ^Bishop David, Butler, 
Durrett, Eastern, Fairdale, Fern Creek, Kentucky 
Military Inst., Louisville Country Day, Pleasure 
Ridge Park, Oldham County, Seneca, Southern, 
Shelbyville, Thomas Jefferson, Trinity, Valley, Wag- 
gener, Western, Westport 

Lexington Region — ^Breckinridge Training, Clark 
County, Danville, Frankfort, Foundation, Henry Clay, 
Georgetown, Good Shepherd, Lafayette, Lebanon, 
Lexington Catholic, Madison, Mason County, Mt. 
Sterling, Paris, Springfield, St. Patrick, University 

Covington Region — Beechwood, Boone County, 
Covington Catholic, Campbell County, Dixie Heights, 
Highlands, Holmes, Holy Cross, Lloyd, Newport, 
Newport Catholic, Pendleton County 

London Region — Berea, Corbin, Cumberland, East 
Main, Harlan, London, McCreary County, Middles- 
boro, Somerset 

Paintsville Region — Boyd County, Catlettsburg, 
Fairview, Hazard, Jenkins, Martin, Paintsville, Pike- 
ville, Prestonsburg, Russell, Wurtland 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled March 1) 

If one telephone number is driven for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are ^ven, the first number is that of the home phone. 
Babbage. Don R., 11000 Grafton Hall, Valley Station. 937-5977 
Clark. Owen B.. 106 Kentucky Ave., Georgetown, 2047, 252-8717 
Gibson, Fred W., P. O. Box 378, Shepherdsville, 543-7885, 643- 

7614 
Stewart, Lawrence, Jr., Short St., Box 542, Barbourville. B46- 

3204, 546-3179 
Wells, Milford J., 344 Bays Ave.. Morehead, 784-5781 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAECH, 1964 



Page Five 



KAPOS News 

Ten years ago this spring a group of 
dedicated and intrested sponsors met at the 
invitation of Mrs. Elmer T. Gilb for the 
purposes of discussing ways and means to 
further the cause of cheerleading in the 
state of Kentucky. At this meeting a name 
was selected and a constitition was pro- 
posed. These sponsors and many more have 
remained steadfast to the purposes and 
have spent ten years in dedicated effort to 
carry out the pui^joses. They are to: 

A. Foster a concern for progress in 
cheerleading, pep clufcs, and baton twirling. 

B. Improve the standards of selection of 
members of the three groups. 

C. Lead pupils to a knowledge and ap- 
preciation of the social and educational ad- 
vantages that participation in these activit- 
ies will bring them. 

D. Promote good relationships between 
the sponsors and the school administrators. 

E'. Improve guidance techniques of spon- 
sors. 

SCHOLARSHIP TO BE AWARDED 

KAPOS is happy to announce the avail- 
ability of a $500 per year scholarship to be 
awarded to a deserving and needy cheer- 
leader. Each applicant must show evidence 
of outstanding academic ability and indi- 
cated need for financial assistance. In order 
to qualify for the scholarship, the applicant 
must have been a cheerleader for at least 
two years and the school must be a mem- 
ber in good standing in the Kentucky As- 
sociation of Pep Organization Sponsors. 

Scholarship applications mav be obtain- 
ed from : Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, College of Edu- 
cation, Lexington, Kentucky ; Mrs. Herbert 
Weddington, Franklin County High School, 
Frankfort, Kentucky. You will also be able 
to obtain them at the KAPOS Booth during 
the state tournament. Deadline for the ap- 
plication is May ]. 
Governor Breathitt To Declare Sportsmanship Week 

Last year KAPOS inaugurated SPORTS- 
MANSHIP WEEK and it was such a suc- 
cess we have decided to make this a yearly 
event. Your local papers will be carrying 
the proclamation proclaiming March 1st, the 
week of the District Basketball Tourna- 
ments, as Sportsmanship Week. Schools are 
urged to implement the idea of good sports- 
manship by having convocation programs at 
assembly, making talks at civic clubs, sub- 
mitting articles to the press and radio, mak- 
ing slogans, posters and decorating school 
bulletin boards. 



KAPOS Poster Contest 

Any school with KAPOS membership 
can enter the poster-making activity. Make 
an attractive poster on any phase of sports- 
manship, using any medium desired. Select 
the best poster from your school, place the 
name of your school and the sponsor's name 
and address on the lower right-hand corner 
of the BACK of the poster. Mail the entry 
to KAPOS, in care of Phoenix Hotel, Lex- 
ington, Kentucky. Use regular white con- 
struction paper 18" by 24". The posters will 
be on display during the state tournament 
in the Coliseum and the Phoenix Hotel. Four 
prizes wlil be given : First prize, $25.00 ; 
Second prize, $15.00; Third prize, $10.00; 
and Four prize, $5.00. Win a prize for your 
Pep Club. 

state Tournament Plans 

There will be two KAPOS booths this 
year. One will be in the lobby of the Phoe- 
nix Hotel, and the other will be located in 
the Coliseum, somewhere near the main en- 
trance. These are for the sole purpose of 
registering and greeting you. Please stop 
by and pick up your name tag and hand- 
book. 

Radio Personalities Needed 

Perhaps you would like to have a part in 
making known to the public just what is 
involved in being a cheerleader sponsor. If 
so, we can use you for radio and po'^sibly 
television interviews. We are especially an- 
xious to use you sponsors whose teams are 
participating in the tournament. It would 
expedite scheduling if you would let us 
know when you check into the hotel wheth- 
er you will be available for an interview. 
Trophies To Be Awarded 

KAPOS is pleased to announce that both 
a winner's and a runner-up cup will be giv- 
en to the outstanding cheerleadinsr groups 
at the 1964 State Tournament. Third place 
in the judging will be given honorable men- 
tion recognition. 

All cheerleaders are asked to wear their 
cheerleader uniform for the final Saturday 
night game. Photographers will be present 
to take pictures of the winners so be pre- 
pared to represent your school in a fashion 
to make them proud of you. 

The sponsors of the winner and runner- 
up schools are asked to come to the floor 
with their cheerleading squads. Besides 
getting the recognition you so well deserve, 
it is another way of letting the public know 
that cheerleading is important enoueh in 
the school curriculum to merit a "sponsor- 
coach." 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



The Flying Dutchman 




The Greyhound Booster Club of Paris 
gets the Abou Ben Adhem Award and 
lexinpton's John "Scoop" Brown wins the 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for March. Ash- 
land's Courtney Clark qualified the Grey- 
hounds for their promotion of clean and 
wholesome policies of leadership in all of 
the athletic endeavors of Paris High School 
while a half dozen recommendations makes 
"Scoop" a pipe smoker. "Scoop's" service 
to the "small fry" in Lexington's recrea- 
tion program admitted him to the growing 
fraternity of Kentuckians who do things 
unselfishly for others. 

A letter has just come from Joe Yanity. 
Everybody remembers when "Little Joe" 
roamed the campus at Eastern State Col- 
lege during the tenure of Rome Rankin. 
Ernie Chattin taught Joe the gentle art of 
officiating in those days. Now Joe is part 
of the firm of Lavelle and Yanity, attor- 
neys at law in Athens, Ohio, as well as an 
official in the Mid-American Conference. 
It's good to hear from Joe. A lot of Ken- 
tuckians wondered where he had wandered. 

One of the finest gentlemen Kentucky 
lias ever produced in Jim Baker of Monti- 
cello. Besides serving as the superinten- 
dent of schools, Jim is one of the best of- 
ficials ever to blow a whistle in Kentucky's 
state basketball tournaments. The follow- 
ing story doesn't involve James E. Baker 
but it does come to the Dutchman from 
"Gentleman Jim." 

Coach "Jumpin Joe" Harper's Monticello 
team entertained Coach Dave Cottrell's Dan- 
ville Admirals. The officials went to the 
center of the floor for the opening jump 
when it was discovered that Kenny Cash, 
official scorekeeper, was nowhere to be 
found. A thorough search of the building 
revealed that the scorekeeper had been pad- 
locked in "Jumpin Joe's" office . . . "by 
mistake," Jim Baker says, "by Coach Joe, 
himself." Brethren, anything can happen in 



high school basketball in Kentucky, and it 
generally does ! 

Here are three rulings you asked for: 
(1) If you have a clock which shows no 
time left to play and it's horn ending time 
goes off a split second later, the termina- 
tion of time is governed by the horn. (2) 
If, in getting adjusted to make a free 
throw, the free thrower inadvertently steps 
on the free throw line and withdraws his 
foot to a legal position before attempting 
the free throw, it is the intent of the rules 
that the official issue a warning that a 
repetition will be called a violation. (3) Call 
a technical foul immediately if a coach 
abuses the side-line coaching rule. 

Bennie Edelen, the reformed federal in- 
ternal revenue agent who now makes his 
living as a tax consultant and by playing 
golf with The Flying Dutchman, asks, 
"What is the complete story of the Game 
Guy Proeram?" Here it is, Ben. 

The Flving Dutchman and Commission- 
er Sanford started the Game Guy Program 
in 1949. Noticing many handicapped young- 
sters who wanted to take part in sports 
programs like other boys and girls, Ted 
and The Dutchman tried to think of some- 
thing to help them. Suddenly, the Game 
Guy program took shape when Bobby 
Kirchdorfer, paralyzed from his hips down 
by polio since the age of three, ran on his 
hands in a wheelbarrow race in a play- 
ground track meet and won over other 
youngsters in soite of his handicap. T^is 
event spawned Kentucky's progi'am for the 
handicapped. It caused many to feel that 
Bobby's example of couraTe and determina- 
tion should be an example for other handi- 
capped bovs and girls if his achievement 
were puhlicized^so Bobby Kirchdorfer ^e- 
came the first Game Guy and his story 
was widely publicized. 

Other physically - handicapped young 
people did take notice. Their reaction was, 
"If one boy can do it, so can another." 
Through the Flving Dutchman column in 
the Kentucky High School Athlete, princi- 
pals, coaches, school leaders, and citizens 
were urged to work with these handicapped 
boys and girls. The idea caught fire. 

The procedure now is for anybody in 
Kentucky working with these younesters 
to inform the Flying Dutchman so that the 
courageous boy or girl can immediately be 
a winner. The boy or girl is sent a small 
statuette emblematic of a winner of the 
Lionheart Award and indicative of tremen- 
dous courage. His or her local paoer, radio, 
and television station publicizes the achieve- 
ment to encourage more young people to 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAECH, 1964 



Page Seven 



participate. In April of each year the young 
man or woman who has overcome the 
greater handicaps to achieve the most in 
sports is presented the Game Guy Award 
for that year at the annual dinner of the 
coaches, principals, and officials of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 
When the Game Guy is presented his 
trophy, everyone stands in tribute and ap- 
plauds. 

So it is that the "Parade of Game Guys" 
is unending and the inspiration they pro- 
vide is amazing. What has happened to 
some of the Game Guy after graduation? 
They are "carrying on." We know where 
some are but others we have lost track of. 

Bobby Kirchdorfer, the first winner in 
1949, is manager of a large country club 
at Brandenburg, Oral Miller, who was Game 
Guy in 1950 is now an attorney in Wash- 
ing-ton, D. C. in spite of his blindness; Dan 
Bosler, whose handicap was one arm off 
just above the elbow is in business. Others 
are in college, business or professional pur- 
suits. They are still setting examples and 
still passing the Game Guy's Test . . . 

"The test of a man is the fight he 
makes ; the grit that he daily shows ; the 
way he stands on his feet and takes Fate's 
numerous bumps and blows. A coward can 
smile when there is nauight to fear, when 
nothing his progress bars; but it takes a 
man to stand up and cheer when some 
other fellow stars. 

"It's the knocks that you take and the 
jolts you get, the shock that your courage 
stands ; the hour of sorrow and vain regret, 
the prize that escaped your hands — these 
test your mettle and prove your worth. It 
isn't the blows that you deal, but the blows 
you take on his good old earth, that show 
if your stuff is real." 

KAPOS NEWS 
(Continued from Page Five) 
Important Letter to Principals 

Each principal whose school is partici- 
pating as one of the sixteen teams in the 
state tournament will receive a letter from 
the Kentucky Association of Cheerleader 
Sponsors. The letter will contain the infor- 
mation concerning the basis of selecting 
outstanding cheerleader squads, and will 
request that the principal send, either by 
wire or special delivery, confirmation that 
the cheerleaders of his sc^^ool are being 
chaperoned by a well qualified, school-ap- 
proved adult. The name of the sponsor 
should be included in this confirmation let- 
ter. Send confirmation to: Mrs. Herbert 
Weddington (KAPOS President), Phoenix 



Hotel, Lexington, Kentucky. 

Dates to Remember 

March 21 — Saturday Morning Coffee. 
KAPOS extends a cordial invitation for 
ALL sponsors and cheerleaders to join them 
for coffee and sweet rolls on Saturday 
morning from 9:30 until 11:00 at the Pho- 
enix Hotel. Look for the room number on 
the day's bulletin board in the lobby of the 
hotel. 

August 5-9 — Summer Cheerleader Clinic. 
The Kentucky Cheerleader Association an- 
nounces the Fourth Annual Summer Cheer- 
leader Clinic. The clinic will be held the 
week of the All-Star Games, August 5-9, 
University of Kentucky Campus. Brochures 
can be obtained at the KAPOS booth or by 
contacting: Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Mrs. 
Milly V. Rodes, or Mrs. Stella S. Gilb. 

NEW PUBLICATIONS 

Administration of H. S. Athletics 

The work of the First National Con- 
ference on Secondary Athletic Administra- 
tion is recorded here in the form of collect- 
ed speeches. Each message represents the 
thinking of a leader in his field. Public Re- 
lations Development of Personal Values, 
special needs in Girls' Athletic Programs, 
and the latest trend in athletics are a few 
of the broad areas considered. 96 pages, 
$1.50. 

A.A.H.P.E.R., 1201 Sixteenth Street N. 
W., Washington, D.C. 

The Knee in Athletics 

The Knee In Athletics will help coaches 
and trainers cope with these problems by 
outlining programs to strengthen the knee 
and restore it quickly to normal action after 
injury. It includes sections on preventive 
conditioning, traumatic injury, physical re- 
habilitation and related research. The au- 
thors have outlined simple and inexpensive 
treatment for protection of the knee and 
shortening the disability period. The pur- 
chase of this book is an important invest- 
ment and worthwhile addition to the shelv- 
es of coaches and trainers concerned with 
these problems daily. Karl K. Klein and 
William L. Hall, 50 pages, $1.50 

Louise Kyle; A.A.H.P.E.R., 1201 Six- 
teenth Street, N. W., Washino-ton, D. C. 
D. G. W. S. Sports Library 

1964-66 Softball Guide— Here is the 
latest revised guide to one of the nation's 
most popular games. Teaching aids are sug- 
gested in articles such as planning intra- 
mural programs, indoor teaching of skills, 
and isometric conditioning. The latest of- 
ficial rules for girls and women are includ- 
ed at the back of the book. 144 pages, $1.00 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



Softball Technique Charts — Twelve at- 
tractive charts representing the combined 
efforts of the Softball and Audio Visual 
Committees of the DGWS. These sturdy 
8V2" X 11" cards are suitable for bulletin 
board display or classroom illustration. The 
elements of girls' Softball are described with 
diagrams on how to catch, throw overhand, 
field, bunt, and bat. There is also a chart 
showing the playing field and one identify- 
ing the equipment. 11 charts, $.75 

Selected Aquatic Articles — Important 
selections on water pageantry include 
choreography in synchronized swimming, 
analysis of basic movements, and a wide 
variety of new swimming stunts. General 
swimming for enjoyment is also covered 
with articles on teaching beginners to swim 
in deep water, analysis of the crawl stroke 
and music as an aid to teaching, 128 pages, 
$1.25 

Official Basketball Scorel-ook — Revised 
scoring blanks by the Committee on Bas- 
ketball of the Division for Girls and Wo- 
men's Sports. 60 pages, $.75 

1964-66 Track and Field Guide— Featur- 
es articles on the conditioning of elementary 
school children, officiating techniques and 
how to organize a pentathlon. The specifics 
of each subject are stressed making the in- 
formation practical for easy application. The 
latest official rules and a handy glossary 
of terms are also included. 128 pages, $1.00 

All D.G.W.S. publications may be pur- 
chased from A.A.H.P.E.R., 1201 Sixteenth 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



1964 TRACK AND FIELD RULES 

The principal rules revisions authorized 
by the Track and Field Committee, effec- 
tive for the 1964 season, are included in 
the new National Federation edition of the 
Track and Field Rules and Records Book. 
They are as follows : 

RULE 2-3: In running events, only the 
winner will be credited with a new record, 
even though both the 1st and 2nd place 
finishers are recorded with identical time. 
In field events (jumping and throwing) a 
new record will be recognized for each boy 
when two or more boys tie at a record 
height or distance, even though points in 
the event are determined by the Olympic 
method for breaking ties. 

RULE 4-1 : All competitors are required 
to report promptly when called. The pre- 
vious coverage has been revised so that the 
former requirement that a contestant re- 
port at the starting mark of a running event 



five (5) minutes before the scheduled time 
for a race, and for a field event fifteen (15) 
mniutes before the time scheduled for the 
event has been eliminated. 

RULE 5-2: A note will refer to an ap- 
propriate situation ruling, which will in- 
clude a chart to explain the "OLYMPIC 
METHOD" for breaking ties in jumping or 
vaulting for height. 

RULE 9-1 : The editorial content has 
been revised for clarification purposes and 
will provide that, at no time during the 
competition, shall the bar be lowered ex- 
cept in resolving ties for 1st place (as stated 
in Rule 5-2 (d). Group I, Field Events (pole 
vault and high jump)). 

RULE 9-2 and 3 : The specifications and 
requirements for the high jump and pole 
vault now, in general, conform to the In- 
ternational rule, except that the use of the 
rectangular crossbar will be permitted. The 
length of the crossbar shall be not less than 
11 feet IV/i inches, nor more than 13 feet 
lV-2 inches. The distance between the up- 
right standards which support the crossbar 
shall be not less than 12 feet nor more than 
13 feet 2l^ inches. A competitor may have 
the standards or uprights moved in either 
direction, but they may not be moved more 
than two (2) feet from the prolongation 
of the inside edge of the top of the stop- 
board. 

RULE 9-4 and 10-1: Specifications for 
the triple jump (hop, step and jump) are 
included. 

RULE 9-6: The specifications for the 
discus have been amended so that the body 
of the discus must be made of wood, plastic 
or composition material, and the rim either 
of metal or plastic. A discus constructed 
entirely of rubber or metal is also legal if 
it conforms to the specifications for weight, 
size and shape. 

RULE 9-5, 6 and 7: A recommendation 
is included to the effect that, for safety 
purposes, areas for the shot-put, discus and 
javelin should be roped off. 

RULE 10-1 : A recommended order of 
events for the decathlon and the pentathlon 
competition has been included. 

MECHANICS AND TECHNIOUES OF 
STARTING: The procedure for the starter 
has been revised to indicate that it is per- 
missible for either the starter or the clerk 
of the course to give instructions to the 
contestants. The starting instructions in- 
clude the procedure for races in which there 
is a standing start. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



Page Nine 



THE 1964 STATE WRESTLING 
TOURNAMENT 

The 1964 State Wrestling Tournament 
was held at Seneca High School, Louisville, 
on February 14-15. This was the fourth 
tournament to be held in Kentucky, the 
first one sponsored by the K.H.S.A.A. Ten 
teams participated in the tournament. They 
finished in this order: Ahrens Trade, St. 
Joseph Prep, Millershuro; Military Institute, 
North Hardin County, Kentucky School for 
the Blind, Seneca, Aquinas Prep., Westport. 
Fern Creek and Hopkinsville tied for ninth 
place. 

Trophies were awarded to the state 
championship team from Ahrens and to 
the runner up, St. Joseph Prep. The 
tournament's outstanding wrestler was also 
awarded a trophy. This award went to Joe 
Howard from St. Joseph, who was the state 
champion in his weight class, 145 lb. This 
award was decided by the vote of the coach- 
es and referees. The referees were Larry 
Ouinn of New Albanv, Indiana, and Harry 
Black from Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Gold, silver and bronze medals were a- 
warded to the winners of the first three 
places in each class. These winners were as 
follows : 

95 lb. — Jones, Ahrens; McKay, St. 
Joseph ; Uhde, Aquinas 

103 lb. — Shaffer, Millersburg; Crowe, 
Ky. School for Blind ; Cowden, Seneca 

112 lb. — Blankenship, North Hardin ; 
Veeneman, Aquinas ; Gabhart, Seneca 

120 lb. — Moore, Ahrens ; Rushevel, Ky. 
School for Blind ; Carr, Seneca 

127 lb. — Abell, Ahrens; Matthews, Sen- 
eca; Moore, St. Joseph 

133 lb. — Graham, Ahrens ; Ward, Millers- 
burg; Hosey, St. Joseph 

138 lb. — ^Grain, Millersburg; Moore, 
North Hardin ; Williams, Seneca 

145 lb. — ^Howard, St. Joseph; Gevedon, 
Ky. School for Blind ; Seay, Seneca 

154 lb.— Hardin, Ky. School for Blind; 
Creech, St. Joseph; Ledbetter, North Har- 
din 

165 lb. — Boothe, Ahrens; Lee, Millers- 
burg; Bristell, St. Joseoh 

180 lb. — Bivens, St. Joseph; Meier, 
Ahrens; Petit, Millersburg 

Heavyweight - Wooldridge, Ahrens ; 
Frane, North Hardin, Karem, Seneca 

Interest in high school wrestling ap- 
pears to be growing in Kentucky. Several 
wrestling clinics will be held throughout the 
state prior to the 1964-65 season. Announce- 
ment concerning these clinics will appear in 
the ATHLETK During the month of March 



OUTSTANDING WRESTLER 




Joe Howard 

clinics will be held at the Seneca High 
School on Saturday morning from 9:00 till 
12:00. State Wrestling Committee Chair- 
man Orville Williams states that interested 
persons are invited to attend these clinics. 



LOUISVILLE FOOTBALL CLINIC 

The second annual Louisville Champion- 
ship Football Clinic for High School Coaches 
by High School Coaches will be sponsored 
by the Louisville High School Football 
Coaches Association. 

The Clinic is to be held on April 10 and 
11. The clinic will commence with a buffet 
supper at 6:30 p.m. in the cafeteria of 
Trinity High School, located at 4011 Shelby- 
ville Road. The guests speakers will be 
John Crow of Vanderbilt, who will discuss 
the "Arkansas Monster Defense" and Guy 
Penny, Morehead State College, who will 
lecture on "Letter Defenses." 

On Saturday, April 11, the clinic will 
move to DeSales High School, located at 
425 Kenwood Drive, where there will be a 
full day of football with eight fifty minute 
sessions in all. 

Featured speakers are Tony Mason of 
Miles, Ohio, who is one of the outstanding 
high school coaches in the country. This 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



past season Tony kept his Avinning streak 
going to forty-seven games and an over 
all record of 87-9-7. Coach Mason will lec- 
ture on "Defensive Secondary'" and "De- 
fensive Forcing Unit." 

Louis Catignani of Father Ryan, Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, was the "Big Eight Coach 
of the Year," and has made five bowl ap- 
pearances in eleven years of coaching. Louis 
will speak on "Pass Offense and Pass De- 
fense." 

John Pickens of Bowling Green High 
has been in the coaching profession for 
twelve years and has been a Kentucky High 
School Coach of the Year. He will discuss 
the "Slot T Offense." 

Speakers from the Louisville Football 
Coaches Association are Jack Kleier of At- 
herton High School, speaking on "Defensive 
Techniques ;" Gil Sturtzel of DeSales High 
School, covering the "4-3 Defense ;" and 
Paul Young of St. Xavier High, who will 
give pointers on "Offensive Center Plav." 
Master of Ceremony is John Meihaus of St. 
Xavier High School. 

Tuition — $3.00 per coach. Mail your 
check or money order to: Coach Ted Boehm, 
Atherton Hifh School, 3000 Dundee Road, 
Louisville 5, Kentucky. 



SPORTSMANSHIP 



A Message to High School Fans 
The following article has been adapted by the 
National Federation. It is appropriate for inclusion 
in game programs. 

These are high school athletes who are 
performing here tonight. They are friendly 
rivals as members of opposing teams. They 
are not enemies. 

This, basically, is the theme of inter- 
scholastic athletics . . . the idea of friendly 
competition. The visiting team tonight, and 
in every interscholastic game, is a guest of 
the home team. They are expected to be so 
regarded and so treated. 

The officials are men who, by agree- 
ment between the competing teams, are 
assigned to administer the rules of the game. 
Their experience and their integrity qualify 
them for their part in thi^ friendly inter- 
scholastic contest. This attitude of sports- 
manship should be reflected by all specta- 
tors, too, no matter what their personal 
feelings of loyalty may be to one or the 
other of the teams in tonight's contest. 

INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETICS ARE 
FOR SPORTSMEN. BOTH ON THE 
COURT AND IN THE STANDS. 



1964 BASEBALL RULES REVISIONS 

Below is a synopsis of the 1964 Baseball 
Rules changes as authorized by the Na- 
tional Alliance Baseball Rules Committee 
representing the National Federation, Na- 
tional Association of Intercollegiate Ath- 
letics and the National Junior College Ath- 
letic Association. 

1. Each base runner, as well as the bat- 
ter, shall be required to wear a head pro- 
tector and he shall be declared out if he 
fails to wear it after being warned by the 
umpire. 

2. The strike zone is defined as the space 
over home base which is between the bat- 
ter's shoulders and his knees when he as- 
sumes his natural batting stance. 

3. Whenever a pitch or any other thrown 
ball lodges in an umpire's equipment, the 
ball becomes dead immediately. 

4. When the pitcher commits any act in 
violation of pitching regulations (Rule 6-1- 
1, 2 and 3) and there are no runners on 
base, a ball is called on the batter whether 
the ball is pitched or not, unless the batter 
at least reaches 1st base safely, in which 
case the penalty is ignored. 

5. 8-2-3-Penalty Exceptions (penalty ig- 
nored) is expanded to provide that the ap- 
peal for an infraction is ignored unless the 
appeal is made prior to the succeeding 
pitch or before the infielders leave the dia- 
mond when a half-inning is ending. 



THREE PHILOSOPHIES 

(Continued from Page One) 
Jesus Christ, and died a raving maniac at 
the age of fifty-six. 

I repeat, whether knowingly or not, 
directly or indirectly, you and I are the pro- 
duct of some philosophy of life. 

I do not thank you find this any more 
clearly defined than in a familiar parable 
that our Lord Himself related. We call it 
the parable of the Good Samaritan. Here 
you have present the three philosophies 
that are prevalent in today's world. 

The first philosophy is seen in the at- 
titude of the thieves. It says, "What is 
yours is mine. If I can get it, I will take it." 

Three years ago I traveled the road from 
Jerusalem down to Jericho. I looked up at 
those bleak hills above the winding road. 
As I squinted my eyes like you do in a 
museum looking at great art, I could see 
caves up in the hills that looked like eye- 
sockets in a skull. And I thought about the 
robbers that still infest that road. 

"What is yours is mine, and I will take 
it if I can." That is what the thief always 
says. And there are those around us today 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MABCH, 1964 



Page Eleven 



who are still saying that. 

That was the philosophy of Adolph Hit- 
ler. Hitler simply lifted Nietzsche's ideas 
about superman from theoretical pages to 
transform them into a frenzy of action. If 
right makes might, then Germany had to 
be the mightiest war-making machine on 
earth. If mankind is of no importance, then 
the Jews and others could be destroyed to 
build up the super-race. Germany-power- 
der Fuhrer-these alone were important. So 
Hitler's army chewed up Austria, Czechoslo- 
vakia, Poland, Norway, Denmark, Belgium, 
Holland, and France. 

The second philosophy seen here is in 
the parable as observed in the action of the 
priest and the Levite. It says, "What is 
mine, is mine, and I am going to keep it if 
I can." 

I hate to admit it, but this college pro- 
fessor and this minister in the parable 
simply walked on the other side of the road. 
One was hurrying to a faculty meeting. The 
other, a church service to attend. They 
both saw this poor individual lying by the 
side of the road with his hurt and with his 
need. But they pulled their robes around 
them and walked on, thinking, "I am very 
busy. You have a problem but I am not 
concerned with it. 

Have you heard the record or read the 
book by this fabulous young man who came 
out of World War II saying that he was 
going to make one million dollars by the 
time he was forty and then sit down and 
invest it wisely? That is draw $50,000, 
$60,000, or $70,000 a year and just live off 
it and do nothing. Have you heard about it ? 

Well, he made his million dollars by the 
time he was thirty-five. Today he goes all 
over the country telling his own success 
story. 

Every time I hear someone bring it up 
I say to myself, "If that is life, I haven't 
learned much about it in my thirty-six 
years. If all there is to life is makin'^ a 
million dollars and then sitting back after 
you have invested it wisely and saying to 
yourself and to others, 'What's mine is 
mine, and I'm going to keep it,' then I don't 
know much about life." 

No, this cannot be. It does not make 
sense. It is not the way Almightv God ex- 
pects us to live in the world. The young 
people of tomorrow will not be what they 
ought to be as long as our arms are folded 
and we declare emphaticallv, "What is mine 
is mine, and I am going to keep it." 

The last of these philosophies as seen 
in this parable is of course portrayed by the 
Good Samaritan. It says, "What is mine ip 



yours, and if you need it, really need it, 
I will share it with you." 

You say that will not work! Think r"" 
trying to win a ball game with that philoso- 
phy ! Imagine existing in competitive Amer- 
ica or continuing in the coaching profession 
with that kind of philosophy ! It won't work ? 

They came out a few years ago in LIFE 
magazine to say that they were going to 
put on the cover of the next issue of the 
magazine the picture of the world's great- 
est living man. Some of us got together to 
express our ideas on the matter. I do not 
know whom you would have selected, but 
I knew I had a winner — Winston Churchill, 
of course. There was not any doubt about 
it. The world's greatest living man! 

The next week LIFE came out on its 
cover with a close-up of a bushy-haired man 
with a big shaggy mustache. The man had 
a little fawn in his arms, and a milk bottle 
with a nipple on it in his hand, feeding that 
little animal down in Africa. The caption 
read: "The World's Greatest Living Man — 
Albert Schweitzer." 

You say it will not work. I say it will 
work ! I say it is the only system of thought 
and philosophy that will work. And will 
continue to work year after year in my life 
and in vours and among the young men 
you coach. 

I am here this minute because of a group 
of men like you. You are not coaching for 
the money; you are certainly underpaid. 
No! Men such as you worked with a boy 
whose father died when the lad was two. 
The father died from an infected blister 
on his foot from playing basketball. He had 
blood poisoning. A shot of penicillin would 
have cured him, but they did not have it 
then. That boy grew up without a father 
and looked to some coaches for help. They 
did not fail me. They shared knowledge 
time, and interest. 

I repeat, I am here now and anythinig 
I have done or ever will do is tribute to 
men like you who have said with your 
lives, whether you have ever stornped to 
analvze it or not, "What's mine is your. If 
you need it. I have time and nptiPTife fnd 
love and know-how to teach and train you." 

Well, there they are — thr°e ^ihiloso- 
phies: that as seen in the thief, "What's 
yours is mine. If I can take it. I will;" as 
seen in the professor and the minister, 
"What is mine is mine, and I'll keep it if 
I can r" and finally as seen in the Good 
Samaritan who said ouite emohaticallv with 
his lins and then with his deeds, "What is 
mine is yours, and if you need it I'll share 
it with you." 



Pag« Tw«lTe 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1964 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Drive 



Lexington, Ky. 



School Representative 

W. Jack Smith 

203 Ohio St., Somerset, Ky. 

Phone 679-1211 

Button Down Sweaters (in stock) $12.50 

Adidas Track Shoes & Flats 

Adirondack Pro Baseball Bats $3.50 Ea. 

No. 68 "Energized Center" Baseballs $12.95 Doz. 

Louisville Slugger Bats 

Baseball Pitching Machine with Remote Control $240.00 

School Sweat Shirts — Short or Long Sleeves in Colors with 

Emblem — 36 Minimum order — 2 Weeks Delivery $1.95 Ea. 

Trophies with Engraving at Store — Large Selection 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



(Jene Stokley 



277-3977 



Dick Wallace 



Three philosophies — take your pick! 
I believe I know your choice. Because of 
your choice the future is bright for our 
children. Our universities will prosper, and 
the glory of this will increase. Three phil- 
osophies — take your pick! 

Why Wrestle? 

1. Wrestling is the most developmental 
of all interscholastic sports. 

2. The individual character of wrestling 
makes victory or defeat a personal res- 
ponsibility. 

3. Wrestling is a contact sport that 
tests strength and endurance, condition and 
headwork, developing self-reliance, per- 
serverance and mental alertness. 

4. Wrestling is a safe sport. The inter- 
scholastic rules provide that every hold or 
move which might endanger the life or 
injure a participant is absolutely prohibited 
and penalized. 

5. Contestants are matched according to 
weight, enabling boys of a size to compete 
in their own class. 

6. Wrestling is a natural test of 
strength, endurance and skill. It is consider- 
ed, with the possible exception of track, the 



most natural activity in the sports program. 

7. Wrestling has special appeal because 
there is continual movement, constant 
change of positions and new combinations 
of holds in every move. 

8. The activity conditions the body for 
a variety of other sports. It helps develop 
coordination, speed, accuracy, balance, keep- 
ing muscles trim and pliable. 

9. It is a sport which provides the phy- 
sical exercise growing boys need. 

— Adapted 



The Human Touch 

May every soul that touches mine — 

Be it the slightest contact, 

Get therefrom some good, 

Some little grace, one kindly thought. 

One aspiration yet unfelt, 

One bit of courage for the darkening sky, 

One gleam of faith 

To brave the thickening ills of life, 

One glimpse of brighter skies beyond the 

gathering mist. 
To make this life worthwhile, 
And Heaven a surer heritage. 

—AUTHOR UNKNOWN 



OUR THANKS FOR YOUR 

CONFIDENCE AND 

COMPLIMENTARY REMARKS 

ABOUT OUR SERVICE. 

WATCH FOR ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF OUR 1964-65 

COVERAGES. 



*7«c Kii'UfdeH. Go4fupj(nuf> general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 255-0835 

P.O. BOX 7116 



1 

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B 
% 

m 

1 

1 
% 

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I 

t 






HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS COMPANY 
For all of your 1964 Spring Spotts 

With the baseball and track season just around the corner let us help 
you take care of all your supplies. 

BASEBALL EQUIPMENT 

We have in stock baseball uniforms, two-piece shirt and pants trim- 
med ready for immediate lettering to your specifications at prices $7.95, 
$9.95, $11.95, and $13.95. Samples and swatches sent upon request. 

MacGregor No. 97 official KHSAA Baseballs, Reach American 
League baseball, Hunt's official League balls, at prices from $1.60 each 
up to $2.35 each,. 

Famous Louisville Slugger Bats and all the other items to outfit 
your team. 

TRACK SUPPLIES 

We have a complete stock on track this year including vaulting 
poles, shoes, uniforms, discus, javelins, timers, batons, shots etc. Write 
us for complete school prices on all your Spring Sports including softball, 
tennis, golf and swimming. 

K. E. A. 

When in Louisville for the K. E. A. be sure to visit HUNT'S Dis- 
play in the Kentucky Hotel on April 8, 9 and 10. 

Our salesmen will be on hand to show you all our new 1964 Spring 
and Summer as well as Fall and Winter merchandise. 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

Wf SHiPlHf DaV You Buy ' 5 




SENECA HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION-1964 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Managers Mike Constant, Lee Eppinger, Roger Eppin- 
ger, Mike Farmer. Second Row: Ass't Coach Tom Ash, Tommy Martin, Allan Hepburn, 
Larry Truimell, Jesse Kirk. David Pflug, Coach Bob Mulcahy. Third Row: Ass't Coach 
Doug Hamm, Westley Unseld, Walter Parks, Jimmy Oiler, Steve Hosea, James Garrison, 
Bob Walker, Pratt Lyons. 

District Tournament Games Won Regional Tournament Games Won 

Seneca 29-24 Eastern Seneca 62-39 DeSales 

Seneca 70-32 Fern Creek Seneca 55-38 Waggener 

Seneca 64-47 Waggener Seneca 51-50 Male 



Official Organ of the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



April, 1964 



BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY^RUNNER- UP 
1964 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 







— 'ih — . 



)ii,ii 



^11^ 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Bob Woods, Ed Monsrch, Bobby Lyons, Jay Herrington, 
Homer Gray. Second Row: Ass't Coach Ginger Wilson, Chtster Holioway, Ronnie Marshall, 
Larry Stephens, Butch Beard, Jerry Poole, Leonard Pools, Coach Don Morris. 



ALLEN COUNTY— SEMI-FINALIST 
1964 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Jimmy Bazzrll, Ricky Carver, Danny Oliver, Norman 
\\ -aver, Jerry Alderson, Ken Rigdon, Julian Tabor, Ass't Coach Tommy Long. Second Row: 
Gary Home, Tommy Towe, Charles Drummond, Murl Weaver, Waiter Reels, Tommy Gumm. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 9 



APRIL, 1964 



$1.00 Per Year 



NEWLY ELECTED BOARD MEMBERS 



r\ 




itf 



kA/k 



Morton Combs 



Gran C. Teater 



Prin. Morton Combs of the Carr Creek 
High School and Supt. Oran C. Teater of 
the Paintsville City Schools will represent 
Sections 7 and 8 respectively on the Board 
of Control for a four year period, beginning 
July 1, 1964. Mr. Teater will begin his second 
term as a Board member, and Mr. Combs 
will be serving on the Board for the first 
time. 

Morton Combs, a graduate of the Hazard 
High School, received his A.B. from Ken- 
tucky Wesleyan College and his M.A. from 
the University of Kentucky. He started his 
teaching career at the Carr Creek High 
School in 1938, and, except for the 1942-46 
period when he was in the Army, he has 
been at this one school as coach and later 
as principal since that time. 

Mr. Combs married Dale Smith, a native 
of Knott County. Mrs. Combs with degrees 
from Berea and the University of Kentucky, 
teaches English at Carr Creek. The Combs 
have two children. Glen, a high school sen- 
ior, is a member of the Carr Creek basket- 
ball team. Linda Susan is in the seventh 
grade. 

The new Board member is active in the 
work of his local Lions Club. He is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. In 1963 he was 
named Basketball Coach of the Year by his 
fellow coaches of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association. He has been selected 
to coach the East All-Stars in the 1964 
K.H.S.C.A. basketball game. 

Mr. Teater, who was unopposed for elec- 
tion in Section 8, is currently Vice-President 



of the Board of Control. He is a graduate 
of Centre College, and he has an M.A. de- 
gree from Morehead State College. He com- 
peted in all major sports at Centre. In the 
years that followed his collep;e graduation, 
Mr. Teater returned to Paintsville High 
School, his alma mater, to coach the Tigers 
to three Big Sandy Conference football 
titles in five years. His basketball teams 
had a 64-13 record. His baseball team won 
three district titles. 

In 1950 Mr. Teater was elevated to the 
principalship of the Paintsville High School. 
He became superintendent at Paintsville in 
1959. He is active in local affairs and state 
organizations. He is a member of the Ma- 
sons, Christian Church, Shrine, and the 
Paintsville Kiwanis Club (past president). 
He is a member of the K.E.A. Planning 
Board, His wife is the former Mary Evelyn 
VanHoose of Paintsville. They have one 
daughter, Dianna Louise, who is in college. 

1964 Annual Meeting 

This issue of the ATHLETE went to 
press just prior to the time of the annual 
meeting of the Association. The business 
meeting of the K. H. S. A. A. was schedul- 
ed to be held on Thursday, April 9, at 3:00 
P. M., in the Terrace Room of the Kentucky 
Hotel, Louisville. The dinner meeting was 
to follow at 6:00 P. M., and was to be held 
in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of 
the K. H. S. A. A. Constitution, the follow- 
ing changes in the Constitution, By-Laws, 
and Tournament Rules were to be acted 
upon by the Delegate Assembly: 
PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that 
"nineteenth" be substituted for "twentieth" 
in By-Law 4, this change to become effec- 
tive on July 1, 1967. 

PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
following be added as Article VIII, Section 
3-d, of the Constitution: "If the contract 
for a football game includes the expression 
''corresponding date,' Thanksgiving Day 
(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



APRIL, 1964 



VOL.XXVI— No. 9 



Pablished moHthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington. 

Kentucky under the act of March X. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Vice-President Oran C. Teater <1960-64), Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-G7). independence; Ralph C. Dorsey 
(1962-66). Horse Cave: Sherman Gish (1963-67). Greenville; 
Preston Holland (1961-6.i); Murray; Don R. Raw'ings (1961-65). 
Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville.' 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



Jtiom the Commissiont'i s 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1963-64 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Attention, Coaches! 

A Wrestling Clinic, sponsored jointly by 
the University of Kentucky Department of 
Physical E(3ucation an(3 the K.H.S.A.A. will 
be held in the Alumni Gymnasium at the 
University on Saturday morning, May 23, 
1964. The hours are 9:00-11:00. High 
school administrators or coaches who have 
wrestling teams in their schools or who 
contemplate inaugurating a wrestling pro- 
gram for 1964-65 are urged to attend the 
clinic. Football coaches are especially in- 
vited. 

STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 
Lexington, Kentucky, May 22-23 

(Time Ls Eastern Standard Time) 
FRIDAY 

3:C0 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (4 heats), 2 
fro::i each hea.t qualify for Finals; Shot Put and 
Pole Vault, Finals. 

3:20 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

3:35 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:05 P.M. — 440 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

4:30 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (4 heats), 2 
from each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:50 P.M.— 880 Yard Run (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:15 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:35 P.M.^Mile Relay (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 
SATURDAY 

1:00 P.M. — High Jump, Discus, and Broad Jump. 

2:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 PjM.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P.M.-^Mile Run 



2:45 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 P.M.— 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P.M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P.M.— Mile Relay 

MINUTES OF THE BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the K.H.S.A.A. office, Lexington, on Friday 
morning, March 20, 1964. The meeting was 
called to order by President Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton at 9:00, with all Board members and 
Commissioner Theo. A. S'^nford present. 

Sherman Gish moved., seconded by Pres- 
ton Holland, that the reading of the Jan- 
uary 25th meeting be waived since the 
memebers of the Board had received copies 
of these minutes. The motion was carried 
un"nimousIy. 

The Commissioner reported the results 
of the recent balloting for Board member- 
ship in Section 7 and Section 8 as follows: 
Section 7-Morton Combs 28, Clinton B. 
Hammons 12, James A. Pursifull 6, Sam 
Potter 2; Section 8-Oran C. Teater 53. 

There was a discussion of the plRn cur- 
rently used in the selection of State Basket- 
ball Toui'nament officials. The Commission- 
er stated that he as State Tournament 
manager had full authority under tourna- 
ment regulations to set up any phn which 
he believed desirable in the selection of 
State Tournament officials, and that, if the 
Board had any suggestions for a change in 
the plan of selecting officials for the 
tournament, he would be very glad to put 
them into effect. Foster J. Sanders moved, 
seconded by Don Davis, that the President 
be authorized to appoint a committee to 
study a possible change in the plan of 
selecting State Tournament officials. The 
motion was carried unanimously. President 
Thornton appointed Directors Davis, Dor- 
sey, Hollanci, and Sanders as members of 
the committee. 

There was a discussion of new proposals 
to be presented by the Board of Control to 
the forthcoming Delegate Assembly. Don 
Davis moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that the following proposals be presented 
by the Board of Control to the Delegate 
Assembly: 

PROPOSAL I — The Board of Control 
proposes that "nineteenth" be substituted 
for "twentieth" in By-Law 4, this change 
to become effective on July 1, 1967. 

PROPOSAL II — The Board of Control 
proposes that the following be added as 
Article VIII, Section 3-d, of the Constitu- 
tion: "If the contract for a football game 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



Page Three 



includes the expression 'corresponding 
date,' Thanksgiving Day shall be the date 
from which the corresponding date shall 
be deteiTnined. This interpretation shall 
take effect in 1966." 

PROPOSAL III— The Board of Control 
proposes the following changes in the regu- 
lations concerning football practice: 

A — Amend the second paragraph of By- 
Law 27, to read as follows: "Any player, to 
be eligible for the first game, shall have 
taken part in a minimum of ten practice 
periods extending over a period of ten days 
during the three weeks preceding the first 
game. 

B — Add a section to By-Law 28 to read 
as follows: "Prior to the football season a 
team may have only one scrimmage, or 
practice game, or gridorama game with 
players other than members of the squad." 

By unanimous vote the Board agreed to 
submit the ti'^ree proposals. 

The Commissioner reported that he had 
suspended three member schools from t'- 
K.H.S.A.A. for short periods of time since 
the January meeting of the Board. 

The Paul G. Blazer High School of Ash- 
land was suspended for a period of three 
weeks, beginning February 9, 1964, and 
placed on probation for a period of one year 
because of violation of the Association's 
Sportsmanship Rule by certain school rep- 
resentatives during the Ashland-Russell 
basketball game played at Ashland on 
January 28, 1964. The Commissioner stated 
that he had also placed on probation all 
students of both the Paul G. Blazer High 
School and the Russell High School who 
had taken part in the fighting during the 
game, with the provision that, if the boys 
are seniors, their probation runs to the end 
of the current school year; and that, if the 
boys are under-classmen, their probation is 
for a period of one year. 

The Trinity High School of Louisville 
was suspended for a period of one week, 
beginning February 19, 1964, because a 
Trinity student, Joe Guest, was allowed to 
represent Trinity in four basketball games 
at a time when he was ineligible under As- 
sociation regulations. The Commissioner 
stated that he believed that the use of an 
ineligible player by Trinity school officials 
was due to a mis-interpretation of Associa- 
tion regulations, and that he considered the 
suspension of the school mandatory. 

The Grant County High School was sus- 
pended from February 19, 1964, until the 
end of the regular basketball season be- 
cause Bobby Kells, a second team basket- 
ball player, had been allowed to represent 



NATIONAL FEDERATION HONOR 




Ed5rar McNabb 

Assistant Principal Edgar McNabb of the Beech- 
wood High School, veteran football rules interpreter 
and K.H.SA.A. representative on the National Alli- 
ance Football Committee, was honored during the 
committee meeting held in New Orleans, Louisiana, 
early in January. 

On the plaque which Mr. McNabb received, the 
following appeared: 

' The National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations Award — Edgar McNabb — in 
recognition of noteworthy contributions as a mem- 
ber of the Game Administration sub- Committee, 
particularly in the field of officiating mechanics, 
To The National Alliance Football Committee — 
Presented in New Orleans, Louisiana, this 7th day 
of January, 1934 — S. F. Burke, Chairman, National 
Alliance Football Committee — ^Clifford Fagan, Sec- 
retary, National Alliance Football Committee. 



his school when he was ineligible under the 
provisions of the Association's Residence 
Rule. 

Foster J. Sanders read a letter from Ex- 
ecutive Director James W. Browitt of the 
Kentucky Fair and Exposition Center, 
Louisville, stating that the 1965 date for 
the State Basketball Tournament was being 
held. Mr. Browitt stated that the 1966 date 
is open, and that there would possiibly be 
a conflict between the State Tournament 
and the N.C.A.A. finals if the Board of 
Control decided to return the 1966 
tournament to Louisville. Mr. Browitt 
further stated that the 1966 date for the 
State Tournament at Louisville would be 
available to the Board of Control if the 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



Board decided to locate the 1966 tourna- 
ment in Louisville, and that, if no specific 
arrangements concerning the possible site 
of the 1966 tournament at Louisville are 
made prior to the N.C.A.A. Summer 
Meeting held in July, he will invite the 
N.C.A.A. to hold its basketball finals in 
Louisville in 1966. After a short discussion 
of certain State Tournament problems, 
Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Sher- 
man Gish, that the 1966 St^te High School 
Basketball Tournament be held in Freedom 
Hall, Louisville ; that Louisville continue to 
be the tournament site until Lexington fa- 
cilities are adequate : and that the vote on 
tJhe site be taken bv secret ballot. Don 
Davis moved, seconded by Don R. Rawlings, 
that the motion be tabled, and that a dis- 
cussion of future State Tournament sites 
be placed on the a^renda of the Board of 
Control April meeting. The motion was 
carried. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by 
Oran C. Teater, that all bills of the Associa- 
tion for the period beginning January 25, 
1964, and ending March 6, 1964, be approv- 
ed. The motion was can'ied unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



1964 ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

shall be the date from which the correspond- 
ing date shall be determined. This interpre- 
tation shall take effect in 1966." 
PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control proposes the follow- 
ing changes in the regulations concerning 
football practice: 

A - Amend the second paragraph of 
By-Law 27, to read as follows: "Any play- 
er, to be eligible for the first game, shall 
have taken part in a minimum of ten prac- 
tice periods extending over a period of ten 
days during the three weeks preceding the 
first game. 

B-Add a section to By-Law 28 to read as 
follows : "Prior to the football season a 
team may have only one scrimmage, or 
practice game, or gridorama game with 
players other than members of the squad." 
PROPOSAL IV 

The principals and coaches of the 44th 
District proposes that "nineteeth" be 
substituted for "twentieth" in By-Law 4, 
this change to become effective on August 
1, 1968. 

PROPOSAL V 

The Secondary School Principals Associa- 
tion of the Upper Cumberland Education 



Association proposes that Article IV, Sec- 
tion 2-b, of the Constitution be amended to 
provide that only a principal, an assistant 
principal, or a superintendent shall be 
allowed to represent a district in the Dele- 
gate Assem.bly. 

PROPOSAL VI 

Prin. Raymond H. Herndon (Bowling 
Green) proposes that the following shall be 
added to the first paragraph of By-Law 27, 
to become effective for the 1966 football 
season: "No regular practice may be held 
prior to August 15, after the regular spring 
practice is completed." 

PROPOSAL VII 

Prin. Letcher W. Norton (Clark County) 
and Prin. James McAfee (Mt. Sterling) pro- 
pose that the following be substituted for 
Tournament Rule IH-D: "The State Basket- 
ball Tournament shall be held in Louisville 
in 1965, and in Lexington in 1966. There- 
after the tournament shall be alternated 
annually between Louisville and Lexington. 
PROPOSAL VIII 

The First District Secondary Principals 
Association proposes to amend Article IV, 
Section 2-b, of the Constitution to provide 
that, if the duly elected district delegate or 
alternate delegate does not answer the roll 
call at the annual meeting of the Delegate 
Assembly, the district shall remain not 
represented. 



The Official Is In Authority 

The attitude shown toward officials is 
sometimes appalling. Fans show a disre- 
spect when calls go against their teams. 
Players sometimes question the decision of 
officials. Coaches occasionally want an im- 
mediate explanation of a call. In football, 
TV coverage showed instances the past year 
of officials running to the sidelines to ex- 
plain a call to a coach. Statements are made 
by coaches occasionally to the effect that 
an official thinks he is the final authority 
at an athletic contest. One sometimes hears 
a statement to the effect that he is a "tin- 
god." 

What do these statements and attitudes 
reflect? Does it reflect that the official 
thinks that he can make no mistake? No 
official with any experience will contend 
that he never makes a mistake. Are offic- 
ials eager to exert authority? The truth of 
the matter is that they do not in many in- 
stances amply exert the authority given 
them under the game rules. 

It is time for all of us to recognize that 
the game rules provide that the official is 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



Page Five 



the final authority at an athletic contest. 
This is provided in the game rules. Con- 
trary to many statements made in regard 
to the official exerting too much authority, 
more serious may be the problem that we 
do not want to allow him to exercise the 
authority granted in the rules for the best 
interest of players. Coaches have develop- 
ed the habit of wanting to come on the floor 
or field to question a call, which is in re- 
ality questioning the authority of the of- 
ficial. The team captain is the person desig- 
nated in the rules to ask for any explana- 
tions of calls not understood by the team. 
Fans often consider the official who is do- 
ing no more than applying the game rules 
as a "robber" if the game h lost regardless 
of whether the reason wps an error made 
by the official or dozens of errors made by 
the players and possibly some coaching 
errors made on the part of the coach. There 
has been evident during the past several 
years too much disrespect shown toward 
officials by remarks made by fans, coaches, 
and players. It is very probable that the re- 
marks of the adults are influencing the re- 
marks of players. 

What is the chief basis for this type of 
attitude toward persons delegated authority 
to administer a contest by a national rules 
committee? One might readily say that a 
part of it is due to an extreme desire, and 
possibly over-emphasis, on winnina:. The ac- 
companying emotions take precedence over 
the good common sense of individuals in 
such situations. 

More serious, however, is the fact that 
this attitude at athletic contests seems to 
indicate what is being increasingly pointed 
out as one of the weaknesses in our pres- 
ent concept of the democratic way of life. 
This weakness is really the result of a lack 
of a thorough understanding of the mean- 
ing of our representative democratic so- 
ciety and form of government. For such a 
society to function best, it is basic that 
representative officials be selected that 
meet high standards who will be entrusted 
with the authority to make decisions for 
those for whom they represent. If these 
persons prove incompetent to make such 
decisions, it reveals that those who elect 
them were not careful enough in making 
certain that they met the necessary stand- 
ards. However, the public has the recourse 
of removing them from office when this 
becomes known. No public official can prop- 
erly serve unless we are willing to delegate 
to him both the authority and responsibility 
entailed in his position. There are far too 
many instances today of public officials not 



being permitted to exercise judgment, au- 
thority, or responsibility without a great 
deal of harrassment and disrespect from in- 
dividuals in our society. These are not al- 
ways the opnosition. Quite often tho"e who 
elect the officials seem to think that they 
then have the authority to see that the of- 
ficial makes onlv the decision that they 
themselves would make, regardless of 
whether or not it were for the benefit of 
the great majority of individual-^. 

What we see in the questioning of the 
authority of athletic game officials and the 
disrespect shown toward them may be a 
reflection of this weakness in our society. 
Whether or not it is would be a debatable 
point that perhaps could not be proved 
either way. However, it would seem that 
schools can do a better job of educating 
youth if they are taught to respect those 
persons who are delegated authority when 
they are attempting to exercise that author- 
ity and the responsibility that goes with it. 
Game officials should be carefullv selected 
to make certain that they meet the stand- 
ards expected by the school. They should 
then be permitted to exercise the authority 
and responsibilitv granted in the game rul- 
es and given full support bv the adminis- 
tration, the coach, and the nlayers for the 
contest engaged. If an official does not 
prove competent, the Bv-Laws provide that 
he need not be approved for anv future 
■contests for which he is not already under 
contract. Following this procedure will help 
to educate boys and girls to a better un- 
derstanding of our democratic way of life. 
Permitting disrespect to be shown toward 
persons delegated authority would be con- 
trary to the best interest of a democratic 
society. Coaches, players, and fans must 
reali7e that the official is in authority at 
an athletic contest. 
— Missouri High School Activities Journal 

Story Of A Boy 

I am a coach in a junior high school. I 
work with 500 boys each day. This has been 
my occupation for over 20 years. I enjoy it. 

Today was test day in climbing a rope. 
We climb from a standing start to a point 
15 feet high. The school record is 2.1 sec- 
onds. It has stood for three years. Today 
this record was broken. But this is not my 
story. How this record was broken is the 
important thing here, as it is in many an 
endeavor in life. 

For three years Bobby Polacio, a 1414- 
year-old ninth grade Mexican boy, has 
trained and pointed, and, I suspect, dream- 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



The Flying Dutchman 




Kentucky's Game Guy of 1964 is Leamai 
Pipes of Bourbon oounty High. Jack Wise, 
prominent basketball official, nominated 
this fighting youngster, pointing out that 
cerebral palsy didn't stop "Lee" Pipes from 
swimming, golfing and bowling, besides 
being active as manager for his "cracker- 
jack" Bourbon County High basketball 
team. Nine judges were unanimous in their 
selection of him. 

The reception the K.H.S.A.A. principals, 
coaches and officials give the Game Guys 
at their annual dinner during K.E.A. is an 
inspiration. One of the following young 
men, whose nominations arrived too late for 
consideration this year, may be the honor- 
ed dinner guest next year: 

Coach Herky Rupp of Atherton High is 
enthusiastic in his support of John Stewart, 
and a lionheart statuette award is on it's 
way to a young man whom Herky calls out- 
standing. Bom with no arms and only one 
leg, John Stewart was Herky's statistician, 
refereed practice sessions, and was team 
mjanavger. Claude Ricketts, vddely-known 
sports official, seconded this nomination, 
saving this lad has conquered — instead of 
being conquered. 

From E. B. May, Jr., of Prestonsburg, 
comes notification that Ronnie Paul Will- 
iamson of Pikeville High School qualified 
for the lionheart award because of his par- 
ticipation in football, basketball and base- 
ball, in spite of crippled legs and feet since 
birth. A letter from Paintsville's singing 
superintendent, Oran Teater, pronounces 
this scrappy youngster courteous, friendly 
and a real prospect for 1965. 

Middlesboro's Walt Green, an official in 
this year's state tournament, wants a lion- 
heart award for Birchy Page of Middlesboro 
High because of his success in football and 
basketball, while overcoming a club foot. 
The award is being sent to you, Walt, for 
presentation to Birchy. 

Remember Elvis Hall of McHenry! Elvis 




Jack Wise 



Leaman Pipes 



is one of the best sports officials to come 
down the pike in many years. Next year 
Elvis will likely be an official in the pro- 
fessional National Basketball Association. 

"Corky" Withrow, the Central City 
Flash, turned in some outstanding officiat- 
ing performances on the hardwood this sea- 
son while waiting for Spring and the 
training camp of the St. Louis Cardinals. 
"Corky", who will replace Stan "The Man" 
Musial in the outfield, is presently doctor- 
ing his feet after an operation for ingrown 
toenails. 

"Scoop" Brown and Irv Spencer send 
compliments for Edd Kellow and Roy 
Winchester for outstanding courtesies 
shown officials at the Trinity and Henry 
County Invitational Tournaments respec- 
tively. Charlie Irwin, the Hopkinsville ar- 
biter, says that Rex Alexander deserves the 
title of "Mr. Regional Tournament Man- 
ager" for injecting his maometic personality 
into brand new services designed to make 
coaches, officials and fans happy to be a 
part of Kentucky's first region. 

A letter from Hudson C. Morris, presi- 
dent of the Paris Greyhound Booster Club, 
says that the Abou Ben Adhem award re- 
cently won by the Club is treasured. Hud- 
son believes the recognition for fine sports 
practices will be a stimulus for the advance- 
ment of sports in his town. 

Ralph Dorsey is known wherever basket- 
ball is better because Ralph helps make it 
that way. When Ralph was starring at 
Horse Cave High in the early thirties, he 
commanded respect as a youngster. That 
resipect has increased with his later suc- 
cesses as coach, principal, and now Super- 
intendent of Caverna. Ralph has named Dr. 
Gilman P. Peterson as the gentleman who 
deserves this month's corn cob pipe of 
honor for unselfish service. The Dutchman 
agrees heartily, and the pipe is on it's way 
now to you, Ralph, for presentation to Dr. 
Peterson, for fourteen years of service to 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AjPRIL, 1964 Page Nine 

1964 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Number of Games Covered: 15 

Average Score: For Winner, 65.4; For Losers, 57; Total for both 122.4 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) 27.8 per game 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 personals .73 per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (Per. and T. for all games 552) Successful 67.4% 
Total No. of Overtimes: 1 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. : (a) Common fouls committed by player while he or a 

teammate was in "ontrol: 2.8 per game 

Average No.: (b) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 10.6 per game 

Average No.: (c) Times dribbler committed foul: 2. per game 

Average No.: (d) Personal fouls along free throw lane: Bv Team A .0 per game 

By Team B __ .06 per game 

Average No.: (e) Violation by team A player along free throw lane: .06 per game 

Average No.: (f) Violation by team B player along free throw lane; .06 per game 

Average No.: (g) Times substitutions were made during game: 13 per game 

Average No.: (h) Times substitutes entered after a violation: 2.4 per 'game 

Average No.: (i) Time outs charged to winning team: 3.1 per game 

Average No.: (j) Time outs charged to losing team: 3.4 per game 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

1. Number of games covered by this report: 15 Games 

2. Average elapsed time per game (from first jump to game end) was 1 hour 14 min. 

8. VIOLATIONS : (Number of times per game) : Total Per Game 

a. FREE THROW provisions: 

(1) by free thrower .13 

(2) by teammate along lane .13 

(3) bv opponent along kne .18 

b. CAUSED BALL TO GO OUT OF BOUNDS: 13.4 

c. THROW-IN provision: 

(1) by offense .26 

(2) by defense 

d. PLAYER TRAVELED: 3.9 

e. PLAYER DOUBLE DRIBBLED: .53 

f. JUMP BALL provisions: .26 

g. IN LANE MORE THAN THREE SECONDS: .66 
h. TEN SECONDS BACK COURT control: 
i. ILLEGAL RETURN to back court: .19 

j. Excessively SWING ELBOWS: 

(1) by offense 

(2) by defense 
k. BASKET INTERFERENCE: 

(1) by offense 

(2) by defense .06 

4. Total number of VIOLATIONS PER QUARTER: 
Average 

(a) 1st 4.6; 2nd 5.3; 3rd 5; 4th 5.4 By Winning Team 10.4 

(h) Overtime 1st 2; 2nd 0; 3rd By Losing Team 10. 

5. TOTAL VIOLATIONS (all types) : Both Teams 20.4 



the athletes of Hart County. This is the and basketball. 

same Dr. "Pete" whose lovely daughter was The Flying Dutchman is signing off now 

an "All Kentucky Cheerleader" a few to catch a plane for Kansas City to meet 

years ago, and whose son is writing sports with the National Basketball Rules Com- 

history in his section in tennis, football mittee. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



HAZARD — SEMI -FINALIST 
1964 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Freddie Barnett, Joe Davis, Kenny Tate, Houston 
Hogg, David Baker, Paul Feltner, Mgr. Charles Noplis. Second Row: Prin. John C. Stringer, 
Jim Smith, James Walker, Freddy Hogg, Emma B. Ross, Chester Rose, David dinger, Phillip 
Hayes, Jim Rose, Ass't Coach John Quillen, Coach Roscoe Shackelford, Supt. R. G. Eversole. 



After The Season-What? 

At the end of the season, many trim 
well-conditioned young athletes will be re- 
leased from their rigorous training sched- 
ules. Will they end their training with the 
season? Or will they make their training 
regimen a pattern for daily living? 

Whether they remain in condition, whet- 
her they continue to reap the values of 
athletic training, depends upon the extend 
to which they continue to exercise, and to 
follow principles of healthful living. The 
physiological law of atrophy from disuse 
pertains to athletes as well as non-athletes. 

A year-round program of physical con- 
ditioning should be advocated for all those 
interested in athletics. Maintaining 
strength, endurance, and agility makes 
possible high performance levels and pro- 
tection against injury unattainable by any 
other means. It eliminates the necessity of 
the frustrating and trying early season 
period of crash-conditioning when techni- 
ques and skills are foremost in everyone's 
mind. 

To assure a carry-over of training prac- 
tices the athlete needs to be oriented as to 
the principles involved rather than the 
specific practices to follow. The more he 



can translate these principles to everyday 
living, the more he will be inclined to con- 
tinue to train. The training schedule, 
broadened in perspective, is actually a com- 
prehensive health education program, deal- 
ing with desirable attitudes and behavior. 

The training "curriculum" covers prin- 
ciples involved in personal hygiene, first 
aid, medical and dental care, rest and exer- 
cise, communicable disease control, envir- 
onmental hazards and preventive pro- 
cedures. The coach as an educator should 
be concerned with the carry over of these 
principles as a way of life as well as for 
"next season". 

Athletics because of their tremendous 
appeal for youth can exercise a profound 
impact on the later life of participants. 
This is not automatic, however, and will 
occur only when: 

— The potent motivation of sports is 
utilized for self -discipline ; 

— satisfying experiences result from 
having attained a high level of fitness; 

— the training program is regarded as 
an educational process for effective living; 

— the adults associated with the program 
provide an example with which the athletes 
can desirably identify. 

— AMA and National Federation 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



Page Eleven 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS — 1964 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed bslow are the tabulations of votes on the twelve officials who received the highest ratings by 
coaohes of the sixteen teams which participated in the recent State Hig-h School Basketball Tournament. 
Each ccaoh voted on eight Certified officials in the order oif his preference, the official whose name was 
listed first by the coach receiving eight points, the second official seven points, etc. The schools given be- 
low are not listed in order by regions nor are they listed in the order of the touimaimeitt bracket. 



Official 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP TOTAL 



Bobby Flynn 


2 


4 


4 


4 


3 


6 










4 


1 


4 




3 


8 


43 


Foster "Sid" Meade 




5 










5 


6 


6 


8 






6 


6 






42 


Roy Winchester 


6 




8 


5 


1 












8 


6 


1 




6 




41 


Charlie Irwin 


7 






8 


5 












6 


3 


5 






6 


40 


Walt Green 




7 










6 


5 




7 






3 


7 






35 


Irv Snencer 


8 




1 


2 






1 


2 




1 


7 


2 




8 


2 




34 


Don Sullivan 








6 




3 


2 


7 


8 


4 






2 






2 


34 


John W. Brown 








3 


6 


5 














8 


3 




7 


32 


Jack Wise 




2 


2 




2 


7 




3 


7 


5 












3 


31 


Jack Smith 




8 


3 








4 


8 












2 






25 


Humzey Yessin 


3 




7 






2 














7 


5 






24 


Carroll Elliott 










4 










2 




7 






7 




20 



Where Are We Headed? 

Editor's Note: The following comments were 
made by Editor Herman Masin of the Scholastic 
Coach at the 1963 Annual IWeeting of the National 
Federation. 

After scouting the ethereal sports 
philosophies being promulgated by too 
many of our wishful-thinking double-domes, 
I will lay out sound, practical criteria for 
the high school administrator. I will then 
review the accomplishments of the National 
Federation in stimulating the enormous 
growth of interscholastic sports, and re- 
commend future goals. 

As I see it, the four major sports are 
dominating the school progarm, and will 
probably always continue to do so. Certainly 
these sports generate the most interest 
and are excellent from the school, com- 
munity, and participants' viewpoints. 

Unfortunately, they DON'T prepare the 
average boy and girl for the future; that 
is, equip them with the activities they'll 
need in their adult years, like golf, tennis, 
bowling, swimming, etc. Only a relative 
handful of schools offer these sports 
either on a varsity, intramural, or physical 
education basis. 

It will behoove the National Federation 
to direct more attention to this area. That's 
the most salubrious sort of cooperation it 
can extend to the National Fitness Pro- 
gram. 

I realize that a broadening of the varsity 
programs would entail enormous additional 
funds for facilities and teaching personnel, 
which the average school won't be able to 
obtain from normal sources. That's why 
I'd like to see the National Federation 
spearhead a drive for federal aid, aimed 
specifically at acquiring some of the where- 



withal to implement the broadened pro- 
gram. This will enable our schools to en- 
large their plants and staffs so that every 
boy and girl could be exposed to a program 
that will have definite carry-over to later 
life. 

The National Federation should also 
encourage greater interest in junior high 
school athletics and girls' intramural and 
interscholastic programs. When conducted 
on a sensible, organized level, such pro- 
grams can produce many wholesome bene- 
fits. 

At the same time, the National Federa- 
tion must wield a stronger whip over the 
so-called maior sports. Instead of content- 
ing itself with resolutions and recommenda- 
tions, the Nation i! Federation should take 
DECISIVE ACTION against the abuses of 
All-Star Games. While the Federation has 
been framing its resolutions, these ce- 
stilemces have been taking firm root. The 
longer the Federation waits, the harder it 
will be to extirpate them. IT'S LATER 
THAN THE FEDERATION THINKS! 

Stronor action is also called for against 
the invidious college recruiting programs, 
the growing practice of using junior hisrh 
school athletics as "farm" systems for the 
senior high schools, and the distinctly 
alarming trend in OVER-COACHING 
(inherited from college and professional 
STwrts). The latter, I believe, is rapidly 
developing into a problem that augurs big 
trouble for the Federation. 

The National Federation must realize 
that the ever-widening explosion in school 
construction and school population will 
have a marked effect on athletic adminis- 
tration. Every administrator will be called 
upon to work longer, harder, and BETTER 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1964 



Everyone involved is concerned about the high cost of claims and in- 
surance involving football injuries and coverage. Here are some sugges- 
tions which you might like to consider and which we believe would help 
reduce the number and seriousness of football injuries : 

1. Require each prospective player to have a thorough check-up before 
he starts practice. Consider any history which might indicate any 
future trouble. 

2. Plan a conditioning program which will get the player ready for con- 
tact work. In this connection conditioning of the knees is very import- 
ant. If you have not already studied the booklet, THE KNEE IN ATH- 
LETICS, we believe you would find it enlightening. 

3. Set up a system of requiring your players to have your authorization 
to see the team physician or family physician so that you can have 
control over this feature. 

These are merely suggestions, and while they are not a magic formula we 
believe they will help solve this problem. 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Deinrtinent 



121^123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. 

P.O. BOX 7116 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 255-0835 



than ever before. And the National Federa- 
tion, like our federal government, will be 
called upon for greater leadership and a 
greater exercise of its powers. 

In the final analysis, the MORAL re- 
sponsibility of every thinking administrator 
lies not in the caliber of his administration 
but in the boy himself. He should try to 
get as many boys (and girls) as is humanly 
possible into a wholesome, healthful athletic 
program that can be fruitfully carried over 
into their post-school adult years. 

STORY OF A BOY 

(Continued from Page Five) 
ed of breaking this record. In his first of 
three attempts Bobby climbed the rope in 
2.1 seconds, tying the record. On his second 
try the watch stopped at 2.0 seconds flat, 
a record! 

But as he descended the rope and the 
entire class gathered around to check the 
watch, I knew I must ask Bobby a question- 
There was a slight doubt in my mind 
whether or not the board at the 15 foot 
height had been touched. If he had missed 
it, it had been very, very close — not more 
than a fraction of an inch — and only Bobby 
knew the answer. 

As he walked toward me, expressionless, 



I said, "Bobby did you touch?" If he had 
said "yes" the record he had dreamed of 
since he was a skinny seventh grader and 
had worked for almost daily would be his, 
and he knew I would trust his word. With 
the class already cheering him for his per- 
formance, the slim boy shook his head nega- 
tively. And in this simple gesture, I wit- 
nessed a moment of greatness. 

I said, "Bobby I'm proud of you. You've 
just set a record many athletes never at- 
tain. Now, in your last try, I want you to 
jump a few inches higher on the take-off. 
You're going to break this record. 

As Bobby came up to the rope for his 
last try, a strange stillness came over the 
gym. Fifty boys and one coach were breath- 
lessly set to help boost Bobby Polacio to a 
new record. He climbed the rope in 1.9 sec- 
onds! A school record, a city record, and 
perhaps close to a national record for a 
junior high school boy! 

When the bell rang and I walked away, 
now misty-eyed I was thinking: "Bobby, 
with your clear, bright, dark eyes and your 
straight trim body — Bobby, at 14 you are 
a better man than I. Thank you for climb- 
ing so very, very high today." 
— Elam Hill, Sequoia (Fresno. Cal.) Jr. H.S. 



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Horse Shoes — 






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No. P — Regulation pitching stakes for playing horse shoes. Price per pair 


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Shuffleboard Sets — 






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Volleyballs — 




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No. 2712-T— Volley Ball net. Price 


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No. N 12— Sutcliffe official night ball; special white cover. 


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Outdoor playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 
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Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equipment. 
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We extend a hearty welcome to you and your friends to make our sample 
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ATHERTON HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPION-1964 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Sam Bate, Nick Gutermuth, Neil Benner, Ben Taylor, Co- 
Capt. David Terry, Co-Capt. Frank Brooks, Roy Goldblatt, Chris Rivers, Marc Cummings, 
Logan Sturgeon. Second Row : David Weston^ Jim RoUwage, Jim Cash, John Kessler, John 
Nolan, Al Welsh, Paul Schuhmann. Third Row: David Schell, Bob Jackson, Bob Sloss, 
Murrell Moter, Will Fulton, Ken vonRoenn. Fourth Row: Coach Marshall Beard. 



Official Organ «f the 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL M^^ ASSOCIATION 

May, 1964 



HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS B CHAMPION-1964 




(Left to Rier'it) Front Row: Sue Roell. Ginny Grimm. Stephany Hall. Lucy Cecil, Pat Meyer. Mary Jane 
Stress, Donna Reed, Nancy Jones. Second Row: Adricn ;e Huhcey, Jane Bryson. Cindy Ney, Marcv Meyer, Debbie 
Reed, Debbie Perry, Pat McCarthy, Barbie Craig, Jill Stivers, Coach Stivers. Third Row: Bunny Wright. Connie 
Drake. Susan Coleman. Janet Kiel, Bunny Button. Bet!] Grover. Linda, Bezold. Maggie Pfister. Susie Snyder. 



SACRED HEART ACADEMY GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS A CHAMPION— 1964 




(Lffl lo Kiehl) 



Front Row: S-.p )( 
Second Row: Sharoi 
caster. Doris Tonini 
1 Conwav. Margaret 



, MiirKif (.Hcdwin. ( .,a' li S.i Iv Roby, Alice Gette'finger, Vicki Baker, 

, Kathy s; russ. Debbie Miranda, Lucy Morrow, Mary Hunt, Pat 

Smock, ?,!ary Ann DeMuth. Third Row: Jean Bruenderman, Mary 

Kathy ilutcr, Kathy Hart, Karen Cocke. Carlin Brack. Pat Nalley, 

Mary Glen Meagher. Dink Shelihamer, Candy Downard, Kristin Pfutzenreuter, 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXVI — NO. 10 



MAY, 1964 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The forty-seventh annual meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
was held at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 
on Thursday afternoon, April 9, 1964. 

President Cecil A. Thornton called the 
meeting to order at 3 :00. He introduced to 
the Delegate Assembly Morton Combs and 
Oran C. Teater, recently elected to the 
Board of Control for a period of four years, 
beginning July 1, 1984, and representing 
Sections 7 and 8 respectively. 

Prior to the roll call of delegates, Presi- 
dent Thornton asked the Commissioner to 
interpret K.H.S.A.A. regulations with re- 
spect to the seating of delegates and alter- 
nates. Commissioner Sanford stated that, 
in his opinion, the intent of Article IV, Sec- 
tion 2-b of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution was 
very clear, namely, thgt only delQ;?ates and 
alternates elected by the principals of each 
basketball district on ballots distributed by 
the Commissioner and returned on or be- 
fore November 15 are eligible to represent 
their respective districts in the Delegate 
Assembly. He then proceeded with the roll 
call as directed by President Thornton. Six- 
ty-one regularly elected delegates or al- 
ternates answered the roll call. 

Eli Alexander moved, seconded by Wil- 
liam Bell, that the minutes of the 1963 
meeting of the Association, which had been 
sent previously to all member schools, be 
approved without being read. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a re- 
port on the activities of the Association 
during the 1963-64 school year (The report 
of the Commissioner appears elsewhere in 
this issue of the magazine). 

President Thornton stated that consid- 
eration of proposals was the next order of 
business. 

Paul E. Kerrick moved, seconded by 
John W. Trapp, that Proposal I, providing 
that "nineteenth" be substituted for "twen- 
tieth" in By-Law 4, this change to become 
effective on July 1, 1967, be adopted. The 
vote was 31-28 in favor of the proposal, but 
this was not the necessary two-thirds vote 



required for amending the By-Law, and the 
motion was declared lost. 

W. P. Wheeler moved, seconded by Roy 
N. Davis, that Proposal II, defining the ex- 
pression "corresponding date" on contracts, 
this interpretation to take effect in 1966, 
be adopted. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

James McAfee moved, seconded by Wil- 
liam Spicer, that Paragraph B of Proposal 
III be amended to read as follows: "Prior 
to the football season a team may have only 
two scrimmages, or two practice games, or 
two gridorama games, or any combination 
of these not to exceed two, with players 
other than members of the squad." The 
motion was carried. Joe Ohr moved, second- 
ed by Rov G. Eversole, that Proposal IH 
as amended be adopted. President Thornton 
declared the motion carried by the neces- 
sary majority. 

John W. Trapp moved, seconded by Pete 
Grigsby, Jr.., that Prorosal IV, providing 
that "nineteenth" be substituted for "twen- 
tieth" in By-Law 4, this change to become 
effective on August 1, 1968, be adopted. 
President Thornton declared the motion 
carried by the necessary maiority. 

John Heber moved, seconded by Paul 
Coop, that Proposal V, providing that only 
a principal, an assistant principal, or a 
superintendent be allowed to represent a 
di-trict in the Delegate Assembly, be tabled. 
The motion failed to carry by a vote of 22- 
28. Clinton B. Hammons moved, seconded 
by John E. Floyd, that Proposal V be adopt- 
ed. The vote was 33-25 in favor of the Pro- 
posal, but this was not the necessary two- 
thirds vote required for amending the Con- 
stitution, and the motion was declared lost. 

John W. Trapp moved, seconded by Roy 
T. Rea^or, that Proposal VI, providing that 
no regular football practice may be held 
prior to August 15, after the regular spring 
practice is completed, this change in By- 
Law 27 to become effective for the 1966 
football season, be tabled. The motion 
carried. 

(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



MAY, 1964 



VOL. XXVI— NO. 10 



FobGshed monthly, except June and Jaly, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

fingered as secend-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

B«»ar THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan 

Tice-President Oran C. Teater (1960-64). Paintsville 

Directors — Don Davis (1963-67), Independence; Ralph C. Dorsev 
(19«2-66), Horse Cave; Sherman Gish (1963-67), Greenville; 
Freston Holland (1961-65); Murray; Don R. Raw'ings (1961-65). 
Danvine; Foster J. Sanders (1962-66), Louisville.' 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



Jt>iom the C< 



omynissioni"i s 



Off. 



tee 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1963-64 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



State Track Committee 

The State High School Track Meet, scheduled to 
be held in Lexington on May 22-23, will be managed 
by Coach Bob Johnson, University of Kentucky. 
O'ther members of the committee arc: James Major, 
Paducah; James HoUowell, Henderson; Elvis Don- 
aldson, Bowling Gre^n; Paul Jones, Fort Knox; 
Emmett Goranflo, Middletown; Wayne Cooper, 
Louisville; Roy McKenney, Bellevue; John Gettler, 
Lexington; Russell Roberts, Richmond; Charles 
Black, Barboui-ville; Arthur Mullins, Elkhorn City; 
and Ernie Chattin, Ashland. These regional man- 
agers will assist Mr. Johnson in conducting the 
State Meet. 

Golf Tournaments 

Sites of the eight regional golf tournaments 
were announced in the March issue of the ATH- 
LETE. These tournaments will be managed by the 
following men: Fred Clayton, Princeton; Elvis Don- 
aldson, Bowling Green; Oz Johnson, Valley Station; 
Wid Ellison, Louisville; John Lykins. Frankfort; 
Walter Baulch, Covington; Richard Morgan, Lon- 
don; and Paul Trimble, Paintsville. The State Golf 
Tournament will be held at Louisville on June 2-3, 
and will b? managed by Ath. Dir. John Hackett of 
the Fort Knox High School. Principals who have 
not received their entry blanks should write to 
their respective managers for these forms. 
Tennis Tournaments 

Three of the eight regional tennis tournaments 
for boys are in the Louisville and Jefferson Coun- 
ty area, and will be managed by Ath. Dir. Emmett 
Goranflo of the Eastern High School. The other 
managers are: Ted Hornback, Bowling Green; Bob 
Burrow, Fort Knox; Roger Klein, Bellevue; Eugene 
Huff, Lexington; and Glenn Presnell, Richanond. 
The State Tournament will be held in Louisville on 
June 12-13, and will be managed by Mr. Goranflo. 

Managers of the regional tennis tournaments for 
girls are: Mrs. Tom Rowlett, Murray; Miss Betty 
Langley, Bowling Green; Miss Margaret Sheegog, 
Louisville; Mrs. Ann Sandusky, Middletown; Roger 



Klein, Bellevue; and Eugene Huff, Lexington. The 
State Tennis Tournament for Girls will be held in 
Louisville on June 4-5. This tournament will be 
managed by Miss Sheegog. 

Attention, Principals ! 

Mor? than 200 principals of K.H.S.A.A. meim- 
ber schools have not as yet filed requests this 
school year for their insurance subsidies. If the 
school is underwriting all or part of insurance pro- 
tection for its athletes, the Board of Control will 
allow a maximum credit or refund of $40.00 to 
each school for 'all sports except football," and an 
additional credit or refund of $6i.00 to each school 
maintaining a foo'ball team. Principals of schools 
which ciualify for the credit or refund should write 
for reimbursement forms at once. 

Fines for Late Rettorts 

Principals of more than 160 schools had not fil- 
ed th=ar reports on basketball officials and their 
basketball participation (eligibility) lists for the 
1983-64 season when this issue of the ATHLETE 
went to pr°ss. Some .500 basketball officials have 
not filed their reports on member schools. The 
Board of Control has established a fine of $5.00 for 
both schools and officials delinquent with their re- 
ports. A deadline of June 15 has been set for the 
filing of all reports required under association rules. 
Officials who have not worked any games should 
notify the K.H.S.A.A. office accordingly. Such notifi- 
cation is considered a report. 



Vettiner Honored 

Charlie Vettiner, veteran rules interpreter for 
the Kentucky High School Athletic Association and 
member of the National Basketball Rules Commit- 
tee of the United States and Canada, was honored 
during the annual meeting of the committee, which 
was held in March at Kansas City, by being elected 
Vice-Chairman. Bud Foster, of the University of 
Wisconsin, is Chairman. 



1963-64 ANNUAL REPORT 
(Presented (to Delegate Assembly) 

Three hundred ninety-eight schools joined the 
Association during 1963-64. This is twenty-seven less 
than the number of schools enrolled in 1962-63. One 
hundred sixty-five schools had eleven-man football 
teams, and five played eight-man football. This is 
an increase of four eleven-man teams over 1962-63. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen regional 
baskei'.tball tournament managers show total receipts 
of $154,731.27. Receipts from the sixty-four dis- 
trict basketball tournaments amounted to $232,- 
282.01. Receipts from ticket sales at the State 
Basketball Tournament, including state tax, will 
approximate $146,000.00. Profit to the Association 
on the tournament will be close to $112,000.00. A 
complete record of all receipts and disbursements 
will appear in a subsequent issue of the Association 
magazine. 

Thirteen hundred twenty-seven basketball offic- 
ials and 486 football official registered with the 
Association in 1963-64. Nine football rules clinics 
were held under the direction of Edgar McNabb, 
and eighty-one football officials took the National 
Federation examination for the higher ratings. Of 
this number, seventeen were added to the Certified 
list, and there were forty-six officials on the Ap- 
proved list. Charlie Vettiner, veteran trainer of 
officials, conducted fifteen basketball clinics, and 
held the School for Basketball Officials. Additional 
meetings and clinics were held by the regional rep- 
(Con'binued on Page Four) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



Page Three 



1964 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, February 21-22, 1964 
" TEAM SCORING — CLASS "A" — BOYS 













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St. Xavier 


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Lafayette 


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Covington Catholic 





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6 


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1 


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1 2 

















1 


1 


4 





6 


Henry Clay 




















2 














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Bryan Station 





. 














1 


" 















I. Fancy Diving — 

1. Jim Cash, Atherton 308.35 

2. Kenny Von Roenn, Atherton— 298.60 

3. Don Watson. Westport 288.95 

i. Bob Cooper, Lafayette 287.25 

6. Alan Wlikinson, St. Xavier 280.80 

6 Tom Ford. Westport 275.15 

7. David Schell, Atherton 270.15 

2. 200 Yard Medley Relay — 

1. Lafayette {Wickman, Huebner, 
Eiehard'3, Sergent) 1 :64.5 

2. St. Xavier (Finnegan. O'Connell, 
Kremer, Bray) 1:54.7 

3. Atherton (Taylor, Gutermuth, 
Elvers, Brooks) 1:55.3 

4. Gov. Catholic (Cobb, Shroeder, 
Suedkamp, Marquis) 1.57.7 

5. Westport (Wood, Warren, Benne- 
witz, Knopf) 1.57.8 

6. Seneca (Driver. Proctor, 
Feldbaum, Schulten 2:02.0 

3. 200 Yard Freestyle— 



Bob Yann, St. Xavier 


2:00,2 


John Nolan, Atherton 


. -_ 2:00.3 


David Gold. Westport . 


2:11.8 


Paul Daniels, St. Xavier 


2:17.2 


Bob Lynch, St. Xavier _ 


. .. 2:21.4 


Roy Goldblatt, Atherton 


2:26.9 


50 Yard Freestyle — 




Ed Struss, St. Xavier 


. _ __ :22.8 


Rusty Shelby, Westport 


:23.8 


Dave Weston, Atherton 


_ :24.4 


M. Harpring. St. Xavier 


:25.9 



5. G. Meiman, St. Xavier :25.8 

In the first heat Strass set a new 

state record in this event with the time 
of :22.7. 

a. 200 Yard Individual Medley — 

1. Rick Hill, Eastern 2:12.9 

2. Jim Smith, Westport 2:14.2 

3 Bob Walker. Lafayette 2:16.1 

4. Martin Kute, St. Xavier 2 :22.2 

5- Larry Bohannon, St. Xavier 2:28.0 

6. Carl Noback. Lafayette 2:37.0 

Hill set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 2:12.9 

6. 100 Yard Butterfly— 

1. Sandy Wickman, Lafayette 1:00.2 

2. Rick Hill, Eastern 1 :00.3 

3. Chris Rivers. Atherton 1 :00.6 

4. Carl Noback, Lafayette 1:03.4 

5 Pat Callahan. St. Xavier 1:05.0 

6. Robert Taylor. Knox Central__l :05.3 

7. 100 Yard Frpestvle — 

1 Howard Wikon. Westport :52. ' 

2 Neil Benner. Atherton :53.4 

3. Bob Yann. St. Xavier :54.6 

4. Merrill Moter. Atherton :54.8 

5. Edward Seay. Henry Clay :56.3 

6 Richard Mazy, Westiiort :56,2 

Wilson set a new state record in this 

event with his time of :52.7. 

8. 100 YqH Packstroke — 

1. Jim Smith. Westport 

2. Dave Terry, Atherton 

3. Dave Bowen, Westport 

4. Will Fulton, Atherton 
5 Tom Finnegan. St. Xavier 

6. Dave Wood, Westport 





01.5 




02.3 




02.6 




Ofi.9 


rier 1 


07.1 




10.4 



9. 400 Yard Freestyle— 

1. John Nolan, Atherton 4:19.8 

2. Bob Sergent, Lafayette 4:47.3 

3. Matin Kute, St. Xavier 4:39.9 

4. David Gold, Westport , 4:41.3 

5. Ned Lawrence. Waggener 4:47.5 

6. Logan Sturgeon. Atherton 4 :54.7 

In the first heat Nolan set a new 
state record in this even with time >f 
4:17.8. 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke— 

1 Bob Walker. Lafayette 1 :07.2 

2. Robert Taylor. Knox Central—l :10.7 

3. Rick Proctor, Seneca 1:11.1 

4. Ronnie Huebner, Lafayette 1:12.4 

5. Mike O'Connell, St. Xavier _.l :12.8 

6. Theo. Schroeder, Cov. Catholic„l :13.2 
In the first heat Walker set a new 

state record in this event with the 
time of 1:07.1. 

11. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay— 

1. Atherton (Terry, Benner 

Moter. Weston) 1:36.4 

2 St. Xavier. (Clephas. Meiman. 

Bray. Struss) 1:36.6 

3. Westport, (Shelby, Bowen. 

Mazy. Wilson) 1:36.7 

4. Waggener (Johnson, Travis. 

Conrad, Burkel) 1:45.9 

5. Covington Cath. (Blank, 
Suedho^z, Marquis, Suedkamp) 1:46.0 

6. Lafayette, (Holliday, Hud'ion, 
Freeman. Cooper) 1:48.0 

Atherton set a new state record in 
thip event with the time of 1 :36.4. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



Plantation Club, Louisville, Kentucky, February 21-22, 1964 



TEAM SCORING — CLASS "A" GIRLS 







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Westport 


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Lafayette 





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Bryan Station 





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2 


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:36.7 



1. Fancy Divin"' 4. Debbie Miranda. Sacred Heart — :30.4 

5. Vicki Smock. Sacred Heart :31.2 

1. Mary McAuIiffe, Sacred Hcart-^299.10 6. Connie Hart, Bryan Station __ :33.8 

2. Vicki Baker. Sacred Heart 282.S5 

3 Margaret McDonald. v*restport__277. j) 5. 200 Yard Individual Medley — 

4. Debbie Brown, Westport 274.70 

5. Carlin Black. Sacred Haart 219.20 1. Jean Henderson, yVaggener 2:28.8 

6. Judy Phelps, Henry Clay 212.55 2. Cathy Struss, Sacred Heart 2:37.4 

7. Mary Anne Demuth, Sacred 3. N. Younkin, Westport 3:13.7 

Heart 196.13 4. Jan Pauline. Waggoner 3:17.8 

Henderson set a new state record in this 

2. 200 Yard Medley Relay — event with her time of 2:28.8. 

1. Lafayette (Boggs, J. Todd, J, R 1 nft Vai-H Riittoi-fl^ 
Meffod, M. Lyons 2:06.7 "• '"" ^^^" KUttertly — 

2. Westport (M, Blaske, M. Hawkes, 1. Mary Ann Horton, Sacred 
S, Wilkerson, T. Fetzer) 2:18.9 Heart 

3. Sacred Heart (S. Rulander, 2. Melissa Hendemon, Westport— 1 
K. Pfutzenreuter, C. Dowiard, 3 June Abercrombie, Lafayette --1 : 
A. Gettelfinger) 2:19,6 4, Carol Hargan, Waggener 

4. Waggener (C. Dietrich, S, 6. Sharon Hancock. Sacred Heart__l :38.9 

Sloan. C. Hargan, J. 6. Pat Nalley, Sacred Heart 1 :45.2 

Edwards) 2:39,3 Horton set a new state record in this 

Lafayette set a new state record in event with her time of 1:09.5. 
this event with the time of 2 :06.7. 

t ^>,^.^ V A T, . , 7. 100 Yard Freestyl^- 

3. 200 Yard Freestyle— ^ j^„ Henderson, Waggener :57,8 

1. Margie Goodwin, Sacred ,.ieart._2 :16.4 2. Margie Goodwin, Sacred Heart.-l :00.3 

2. Jeanne Hill, Westport 2:24.3 3. Judy Mefford. Lafayette 1 :03.S 

3. Marvin Lyons, Lafayette 2:26.7 4. Bunny Wilburn, Sacred Heart —1 :08.1 

4. Sharon Rueff, Sacred Heart 2 :28.,i 5, Pat Ross, Sacred Heart 1:13 1 

5. Claudia Conway, Sacred Heart— 2:39.6 6. Sharon Gibson, Bryan Station __1 :13 3 

6. Sharon Sloan, Waggener 3:21.5 Henderson set a new state record in 

tliis event with her time of :57.S. 

4. 50 Yard Freestyle— 

1 Melissa Henderson, Westport.. :27.7 *. 100 Yard Backstroke— 

2. Mary Jane Mitzlaff, Sacred 1. Charlene Boggs, Lafayette 1 :09.4 

Heart :28,2 2. Marilyn Blaske, Westport 1:11.0 

3 Mary Ann Horton, Sacred Heart— :28.4 3 Sue Rulander, Sacred Heart 1 :21.- 



4. Margaret Peake. Sacred Heart— 1:23.1 

5. Laura Lorenz, Westport 1:23.2 

6. Barbara Skinner, Westport 1:27.5 

Boggs set a new state record in this 

event with her time of 1 :09.4. 

9. 400 Yard Individual Medley — 

1. Jeanne Hill. Westport 6:03.5 

2. Cathy Struss, Sacred Heart ..6:14,i 

3. Sharon Ruff. Sacred Heart 6:22.9 

4 Claudia Conway. Sacred Heart--5 :58.1 
6 Elizabeth Lancaister, Sacred 

Heairt 6:49.9 

10. 100 Yard Breastroke — 

1. Jeanne Todd. Lafayette 1:16.4 

2. Mary Hawkes, Westport 1:23.3 

3. Kristin Pfutzenreuter, Sacred 

Heart 1 :26.8 

4. Connie Abele, Henry Clay 1:30.0 

5. Caroline Cornish, Henry Clay— 1 :30,1 

6. Sharon Hancock, Sacred Heart.. 1 :30.5 

11. 200 Yard Free Relay— 

1. Sacred Heart (A. Gettelfinger, 
V. Baker, M. Mitzlaff, B. 
Wilburn) 2 :00.3 

2. Westport (T. Fetzer, S, 
Wilkerson, N, Younkin, J, 
Henderson) 2:09.3 

3. Henry Clay (S. Bender, 3. 
Hawkins, P. Matheny, C. Abele) 2:15.4 

4. Lafayette. (J. Abercrombie, L. 

Hoff, D. Melette, A. Davis) 2:16.4 

5 Waggener 2:22.? 

6. Bryan Station 2:24.4 

Sacred Heart set a new state record 
in this event with the time of 2:00.3. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Page Two) 
resentatives who conitinue to render a fine service 
to the officials and schools in their respective areas. 
Sixty-eight officials took the National Federation 
basketball examination with nineteen being added 
to the Certified list and thirty-seven receiving the 
Approved rating. 

Six members schools were suspended from the 
Association and two were placed on probation dur- 
ing the current school year. One of the suspended 
schools and both of the schools placed on probation 
were considered guilty of violating K.H.S.A.A. By- 



Law 17, the Association's Sportsmanship Rule. 

The foatiball playoffs, started in 1959, continue 
to create interest in the sport. Eight of the ten 
regions in the three classes now have districts, and 
this plan will be continued in 1964. 

Nine regional cross country runs were held on 
November 2 for the purpose of qualifying teams 
and individuals for the state event, which was held 
in Lexington on November 16. Ninety schools were 
represented by cross country teams in the fall of 
1963. 

The Class A section of the State Swimming 
Meet was held in Louisville on February 21-22. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



Page Five 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, April 3-4, 1964 



TEAM SCORING — CLASS "B" BOYS 



TEAM 




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Hopkinsville 


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31 


University 








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4 


4 


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28 


Foundation* 


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5 





2 


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Harrodsburg 




















7 





7 








14 


Good Shepherd 











7 








5 


1 











12 


Breckinridge Training ___ 








3 

















3 





2 


8 


Frankfort 











1 

















1 





2 







1. Fancy Diving — 

1. Jerry Baker, Foundation 

2. Bob VanCorback, Fort Knox. 

3. Happy Higgins, Hopkinsville.. 

4. Beattie DeLong, Highlands _— 
6. Chuck Jones, HopkinsviUe— - 

6. Jeff Tull, Hopkinsville 

7. Mike Rice, Highlands 

2. 200 Yard Medley Relay 

1. Highlands (T. Bush, Ed. 
Kreiling, C. Wilson, T. Reik). 

2. Hopkinsville (T. Dorroh, C. 
Campbell, A. Boxley, L. 
Dorroh) 

3. Fort Knox (J. Whitley, 
G. Pitts, B. Stack, B. 
VanCorback) 

3. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

1. Lee Bezold, Highlands 

2. Jim Wade, University 

3. John Quinn, Lex. Catholic . 

4. Tom Bowne, Breckinridge 
Training 

5. Chip Hunter, Highlands 

6. Frank Meador. Fort Knox— 
Bezold set a new state record 

event with his time of 2:01.3. 

4. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

1. Jim Ramsey, Good Shepherd. 

2. Larry Grossman, Foundation. 

3. Jon Freeman, University 



.268.80 
_241.90 
_193.l5 
_167.05 
.166.10 
-132.45 
.126.70 



Tim Fosdick, Highlands ... 
Bill Thurmond, Hopkinsvil 
Hank Thompson, Frankfort 



26.7 
:27.3 
:27.5 



_2 :01 3 
_2:06 2 
_2:24.0 

.2:34.8 
,2:35.3 
_2:42 



5. 200 Yard Individual Medley 

1. Pat Quinn, Lex. Catholic 2 

2. Mike Moormai., Lex. Catholic — 2 

3. Jake Thornbury, University 2 

4. Bob Johnson, Highlandu 2 

5. Jim Jones, Highlands 2 

6. Tom Grimm. Highlands 3 

6. 100 Yard Butterfly — 

1. Lee Bezold, Highlands 1 

2 Jim Wade, University 1 

3. Steve Scharstein, Highlands 1 

4. Bill Stack, Fort Knox 1 

5. Garry Abrams, Foundation 1 

6. Tom Ader, Highlands 1 

Bezold set a new state record in 

event with his time of 1 :00.5. 

7. 100 Yard Freestyle — 

John Simu. Harrodsburg 

Jim Ramsey, Good Shepherd 

Larry Grossman, Foundation — 

Jim French. Fort Knox 1 

Jeff Moffitt, Highlands 1 

Tim Fosdick, Highlands 1 

100 Yard Backstroke — 

Pat Quinn, Lex. Catholic 1 

Jack Addams, Highlands 1 

Mike Morman, Lex. Catholic — 1 

Ted Bush, Highlands 1 

Tom Dorroh, Hopkinsville 1 



6. Jack Wylie. Ft. Knox 1 :17.5 

Quinn set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1:02.6. 

9. 400 Yard Freestyle — 

1. John Sims, Harrodsburg 4:49.3 

2. John Quinn, I^x. Catholic 5:03.6 

3. Mike Halvick, Highland 5:38.0 

4. Tom Bowne, Breckinridge 
Training 5 :42.3 

5. Steve Scharstein, Highland's 5 :57.5 

6. Frank Meador. Ft. Knox 6:02.6 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

1. Claude Wilson, Highlands 1 

2. Ed Kreiling, Highlands 1 

3. Jake Thornbury, University 1 

4. Keith Lucey, Ft. Knox 1 

5. George Pitts, Ft. Knox 1 

6. Hank Thompson, Frankfort.. 1 

Wilson set a new state record in thid 

event with his time of 1:11.0. 

11. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

1. Highlands (J. Moffitt. K. 

Grimm, T. Reik, J. Addamo)..! :44 4 

2. Hopkinsville (L. Dorroh, G. 

Cayce, A. Boxley, B. Thurmond._l :48.9 

3. Fort Knox (J. Murdoch, J. 
French, J. Wyie, K. Lucey) 1:50.1 

4. University (T. McKiney, T. 
Brewer, H. Poole, J. Freeman)..! :62 4 

5. Breckinridge Trng. (B. Day, 
H. Sharp, J. Calvert. P. 

CaudiSl) 2 :12.8 



Eleven schools sent boys' teams to the meet, and 
six schools entered girls' teams. The Class B Meet 
was held in Lexington on April 3-4, Ten boys' 
teams and nine girls' teams were entered in this 
meet. The increase and interest in girls' swimming 
caused the State Swimming Committee to set up 
the A and B classifications for both boys and girls 
this year. 

One hundred ninety-five schools will send teams 
to the twelve regional track meets this spring. 



Fifty-one district tournaments have been set up for 
baseball, to accommodate the 300 teams which will 
enter the tournaments. There will be 105 schools 
witih golf teams, fifty-nine with boys' tennis teams, 
and thirty--four with girls' tennis teams. 

Principals of thirteen schools have indicated 
their interest in the Rifle Marksmanship Champion- 
ship, scheduled to be held at the University of 
Kentucky on April 25. The slow increase in the 
number of sdhools sponsoring riflery has been some- 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, April 3-4, 1964 





TEAM SCORING - 


- CLASS "B" GIRLS 














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Fancy Diving — 4. 

Bonnie Besten. Lex. Catholic._247.95 5. 

Sandra Stone. Hopkinsville IM.I.i 6. 

Suzanne Higrgins. Hopkinsville 

Betsy Eddy. Beechwood 

Mary J. Stress. Highlands _ 
Mary Higgins. Hopkinsville,. 
Stephany Hail. Highlands 

200 Yard Medley Relay 

Hghlands (Bezold, Reed, Kiel 

BrjTjon) 

Hopkinsville (Robertn. S.^Dader 
VanMeter. T. Dade).. _ 
Beechwood (Zeidler. Eddy, 

P. Zeidler, Hanifin) 

Fort Knox (Haggerty. French, 
Telese, Quinn) 

200 Yard Freestyle — 

Anne Wiglesworth, Lex. 

Catholic 

Janet Kiel. Highlands ...I' 

Sue Riley, Harrodsburg 

Sally Caudill, Breckinridge 
Training 3 :22.6 

50 Yard Freestyle — 

Debbie Reed. Highlands :28.1 

Cindy Ney, Highlands :30 '. 

Cathy Stone. Hopkinsville :31.0 



.192 -'0 5. 



-2:22.3 
12:23.4 
-2 :45.i 
.2:49.1 



.2:30.8 
.2:44 
.3:03.3 



Becky Mclntyre. University :32 3 

Cecilia Potter. Harrodsburg .. :33. i 
Mary Higgins. Hopkinsville :34.0 

200 Yard Indivi-'u'fl Medlev — 

Jill Stivers. Highlandu 2:43.7 

Marge Wearen, Harrodsburg — 2 :57.0 

Peggy Zeidler, Beechwood 3:52". 

Nancy Rouse, Beechwood 4:10.3 

100 Yard Butterfly — 

Josie Ramsey, Good Shepherd — 1 :10.6 

Pat Wade. Universtiy 1 :13.0 

Adrienne Huheey. Highlands — 1 :26.5 

100 Yard Freestyle — 

Debbie Reed, Highlands 1 :04 i 

Josie Ramsey. Good Shepherd — 1 

Ginny Grimm, Highlands 1 

Ardea Barrows, Beechwood 1 

Bunny Wright, Highlands 1 

Sally Caudill, Breckinridge 
Training 1 : 

100 Yard Backstroke — 

Ann Wiglesworth, Lexington 
Catholic 1 

Nancy Joneo, Highlands 1 

Cecelia Potter, Harrodsburg 1 

Linda Roberts, Hopkinsville 1 

Linda Bezold, Highlands 1 

Connie Drake. Highlands 1 



20.9 
23.2 
26.0 



9. 400 Yard Freestyle — 

1. Jill Stivers. Highlands 5:12.8 

2. Pat Wade, University 5:30.6 

3. Sue Riley, Harrodsburg 6:34.3 

4. Nancy Rouse, Beechwood 7:35.3 

10. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

1. Donna Reed. Highlands 1 

2. Margo Wearen. H;:rrodsburg..l 

3. Bethany Grover. Highlands 1 

4. Judy Coleman. Highlands 1 :40.0 

5. Lourje Mickler. University ..1:43.0 

6. Susan Coleman. Highlands ..1 :44 3 

11. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

1. Highlands J. Bryson, C. Ney, 

A. Huheey, N. Jones) 2:02.5 

2. Hopkinsville (S. Dade, J. Van- 
Metre, T. Dade, C. Stone) 2:03.5 

3. Beechwood (A. Burrows. C. 
Crouch. S. Zeidler. P. 

Hanifin) 2 :20.3 

4. University (B. Griffin. N. 
Marlowe, L. Mickler, B. Mc- 
lntyre) 2:20 i 

5. Fort Knox (K. Wittenbeck, 
S. French, ,-3. Samuell, M. 

Quinn) 2 :26..i 



what disappointing. 

The 1964 State Wrestling Tournament, held at 
the Seneca High School on February 14-15, was the 
fourth tournament to be held in Kentucky, the first 
one sponsored by the K.H.S.A.A. Ten teams par- 
ticipated in the tournament. It is thought that in- 
terest in this sport will increase rapidly. A Wrest- 
ling Clinic, sponsored jointly by the University of 
Kentucky Department of Physical Education and 
the K.H.S.A.A., will be held in Lexington on May 
23. High school administrators and coaches who 
have wrestling teams in their schools or who con- 
template inaugrurating a wrestling program for 
1964-65 are urged to attend the clinic. Football 
coaches are especially invited. 



Local medical societies, the Kentucky State 
Medical Association, and the K.H.SA.A. combined 
their efforts to conduct four athletic injury pre- 
vention conferences within the past year. The^ State 
Medical Association will continue this service to 
Association member schools during 1964-65. Ad- 
ministrators and coaches are asked to give their 
assistance to this very important project. 

A report such as this would never be complete 
without a statement to the effect that the Board of 
Control, the Commissioner, and the Assistant Com- 
missioner appreciate very much the excellent coop- 
eration of numerous school administrators, coaches, 
and officials in making possible the expanding pro- 
gram of the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



Page Seven 



The Flying Dutchman 




If you doubt that Kentuckians have 
hearts as big as watermelons, read this 
story of a Hazard mountaineer who will be- 
come only the second to he named one of 
"Nature's NoMemen" by The Flying Dutch- 
man. Herb Ockerman of Florence is the 
first on this list. 

Arnett Strong, the happy mountaineer, 
nominated Mosco Blackburn, and Mosco will 
receive the "Nature's Nobleman Plaque" 
from Hazard's Mayor Willie Diwahare while 
the May flowers are in full bloom in those 
majestic mountains. Mosco is more than a 
foreman for the Kentucky Power Company ; 
he's a foreman for every kid who needs 
something. When Dilce Combs, M. C. Napier 
and Leslie County High Schools needed 
lights for their football fields, they were 
stymied because of installation costs. Mosco 
fixed this in a hurry by spending his week- 
ends doing the job. It was Mosco Blackburn 
again whose leadership was so important in 
making Little League Baseball and kid's 
football programs so successful in Hazard. 
This forty-six year old citizen is a legend 
in his own time. Coach Roscoe Shackelford 
says that the things he has done for sports 
in that area would be like listing Sam 
Snead'-^ achievements in golf. The Dutch- 
man doffs his hat to Mosco who goes on 
'his record as one of "Nature's Noblemen." 

A new film, "This Is Basketball," was 
made in Tipton, Indiana, in April. If you've 
just taken these instructional films for 
granted, you should have Leen with the 
Dutchman during the five days of meetings 
and picture shooting. To make one of these 
films a combination of unselfish effort by 
many people and a willingness to work 
twelve hours a day is essential. "Doc" Run- 
yon, director of the Official Sports Film 
Service, did a masterful job and was as cool 
as a cucumber after the film was finished. 
Doc's a great little guy. 

Commissioner Ted and Mrs. Sanford 




joined Commissioners Lyle Quinn of Iowa, 
Al Willis of Illinois, 
Charlie Forsythe of 
Michigan, C o 1 onel 
Paul Landis of Ohio 
and the host Com- 
missioner from In- 
diana, Colonel Phil 
Eskew, to chaper- 
one the work ing 
technicians. These 
included John Bunn 
and Ed Steitz. Edi- 
tor and Assistant 

Editor of the Rule Jerry Kimmel 

Book; Cliff Fagan, Chief of the National 
Federation of High School Athletci Associa- 
tions ; debonair IV^ilt Sprunger, assistant to Al 
Willis; Les Ansorge of Wisconsin, and the 
Dutchman. Colonel Eskew was the perfect 
host performing double duty while his as- 
sistant commissioner. Colonel Herman Kel- 
ler, recovered from an operation in Indian- 
opolis. 

To make one of these films it's impera- 
tive to have an excellently disciplined team. 
Coach Dick Barr of Tipton provided the 
best shooting and best behaved group of 
basketeers this Dutchman has ever seen. 
Incidentally, Tipton High School is one 
of the best administered schools these eyes 
have witnessed, and incidentally again you 
western Kentuckians will remember Dick 
Barr when he coached in Henderson. Dick 
handles boys with enviable ease. 

All Kentuckians are accustomed to my 
worn-out 1957 Pontiac, but this "Tiger of 
the Highway" was a conversation piece 
with those film makers. Neither of the 
two officials, Virgil Emswiler, Ohio, and 
Ken Schuman, Michigan, would risk their 
striped shirts by riding in "The Tiger" 
from Kokomo, where we stayed, to Tipton. 
The Dutchman drove Cliff Fagan and Milt 
Sprunger to Indianapolis one night, and 
Mrs. Sprunger sat up until midnight worry- 
ing about Milt. She said that she wasn't 
sure my four-door car (with the electric 
cigar lighter) would make it all the way 
back. Colonel Harold A. Meyer, Assistant 
Commissioner of Ohio, had his charming 
wife with him, and she ruled "no" on his 
riding with the Dutchman on the basis 
that Harold was too good a husband to 
replace. "Doc" Runyon's wife furnished a 
piece of rope to tie the four doors shut. 
This writer will always hold a warm and 
appreciative feeling for Nelle Sanford who 
watched out for his health and welfare dur- 
ing the time she and Ted were there. That 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



National Federation crew are great to be 
with. 

Normally only one Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor is awarded each month, but because 
this is our last column before September 
we are sending two. Jerry Kimmel of Beech- 
mont, Kentucky, wins one because of the 
countless hours he has devoted toward work- 
ing for improvement of officiating in his 
region. Dick Barr, Coach of Tipton High 
School, receives the other for his unselfish 
service to basketball throughout the nation 
in the making of the basketball film in the 
Indiana city. The Abou Ben Adhem Citation 
will be sent to Colonel Phil Eskew's Indiana 
High School Athletic Association for pro- 
moting good fellowship during the week of 
film making. 

The Dutchman signs off for the sum- 
mer, thanking you brave Kentuckians for 
all of those invitations to speak at your 
commencements, but we are limited to only 
two. Right now Principal Eddie Steen and 
his graduates of Gamaliel High School are 
getting a Kentucky Country ham dinner 
set up for the Dutchman in May. Nobody 
has more fun than your Dutch Flyer. See 
you at our Basketball School For Officials 
at Lexington in August. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association met at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Fri- 
day morning. April 10, 1964. The meeting was called to 
order by President Cecil A. Thornton, with all Board mem- 
bers, Commiisioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield present. The invocation was given 
by Don R. Rawlings. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Don Davis, that the 
read ng of the minutes of the March 20th meeting be waived 
since members of the Board had received copies of thesJ 
minutes. The motion was carried ".inanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report on the state basket- 
ball tournament receipts and expenses. He stated that total 
receiplrj. including ticket sales, program profits, and tele- 
vision fee would exceed $160,000.00, and he estimated that 
profits to the Association would be a figure close to $112,000.00. 

The Commiss-'oner read a letter addressed to the Board 
of Control and written by Mr. T. H. Hardwick, a representa- 
tive of the Lexington Chamber of Commerce, suggesting th'j 
possibility of television rights for the 1966 State Basketball 
Tournament, if the tournament should be held in Lexington 
that year, being sold for the amount of $10,000.00 to a 
grroup headed by a Lexington television station, this amount 
to minimize the loss, if any, to the K.H.S.A.A, in receipts 
from ticket sales by comparison with sales when the tourna- 
ment iu held in Louisville, Mr, Hardwick gave other reasons 
in his letter for his opinion that the 1966 tournament should 
be >-»'d in Lexington. The Commissioner stated that Mr. 
Hardwick had asked to appear before the ^oard to discuss 
the location of the 1966 State Basketball Tournament, an 1 
that he ^ad invited Mr. Hardwick to meet with the Board. 
At this time Mr. Hardwick appeared before Lhe Board, dis- 
cuyjed the statements made in his letter, and repeated his 
invitation for the Board to locate the 1966 State Basketba.l 
Tournament in Lexington. After Mr. Hardwick had retired, 
Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Sherman Gish, that 
the State Basketball Tournament be held annually in Louis- 
ville until such time when hotel facilities, gymnasium facili- 
ties, and possible patronage improve in another location. 
President Thornton asked the Commissioner to poll the Board 
on the motion. The motion carried by a vote of 6-2. Voting 
"Aye" were Directors Davis, Dorsey, Gish, Holland, Sanders 
and Teater. President Thornton and Director Rawlings voted 
"No." 

The Commissioner read a letter from Dr. R. E. Davis of 
Central City, Chairman of the School Health Committee ol 
the Kentucky State Medical Association, offering the services 
of hie organizaion in continuing to conduct Athletic Injury 



Prevention Conferences. It was the unanimous opinion of the 
Board members that the conferences mentioned should be 
contniued, and the Commissioner was directed to write Dr. 
Dav!s concerning the possibility of his organization conducting 
an \thlet'c Injury Prevention Conference at each of the 1964 
K.H.S.A.A. football clinics. 

The Commissioner asked Assistant Commissioner Mansfiell 
to present his recommendations to the Board for possible; 
1965 and 1966 football redistricting. Mr. Man.jfield complied 
with this request. Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don 
Rawlings, that the re-districting recommended by Mr. Mans- 
field be approved by the Board, and that the Conimiaj'oner 
make available to the principals of schools maintaining foot- 
ball, after the correct 1963-64 school enrollments have been 
determined, information concerning the football districts and 
regions for the 1965-66 and 1966-67 school years. The motion 

Upon recommendation of the Commissioner, Sherman Gish 
moved, seconded by Don Davis, that the insurance subsidy ^or 
each Association member school for 1964-65 be a basic 
amount of $40,00, with an additional subsidy of $60.00 for 
each school maintaining football. The motion was carried 

The Commissioner read a letter from Mr. W. T. Isaac. 
Executive Director for the Kentucky Society of Crippled 
Children, asking that he meet with a joint committee composed 
of representatives of the Louisville Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Kentucky Society for Crippled Children, to 
discuss the possibility of the Board of Control giving its 
sanction to an All-Star football game to be held in Louisville 
late in August, the profits from which would go to the 
Kentucky Society, The Commissioner stated that he had met 
with the committee earlier in the week, and had ex-ilained 
that the Poard had adopted a policy of giving its sanction 
only to the football and basketball games sponsored by the 
Kentucky Coaches Association. The Comm'-ssioner stated that 
he had further told the Committee that the Board had not 
given its sanction to the annual A'l-Star Kentucky-Indiana 
basketball games, but that the Board had no objection to 
ti.ese ir-^-nes be'ng nlayed. and that the games were sanctioned 
annually by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Don 
R. Rawlings moved, tseconded by Foster J. Sanders, that the 
Board of Control take the same position concerning the pro- 
posed Louisville Chamber of Commerce City-County All-Star 
football game as it does toward the annual Kentucky-Ind-ana 
basketball games. The motion was carried unanimously. 

l^alph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that 
the summer meeting of the Board of Control be held at Ken- 
lake Hotel, Hard'n, Kentucky, on August 1. The motion wao 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Foster .1. Sander«, 
that Don Davis and Preston Holland be named delegate and 
alternate respectively to the forthcoming summer meeting of 
the Na^'ona' Federation of State H'gh School Athletic Associa- 
tions. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There was a discu'ssion of possible basketball re-districting 
for 1964-65. Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Sherman 
Gish, that the following re-districting be made for 1964-65: 
Christian County High School to be moved from District 8 to 
District 7, Durrett High School to be moved from District 28 
to District 27, Stanford High School to be moved from District 
46 to District 45. and Greenup High School to be moved 
from D'utrict 64 to District 63. The motion was carried 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by Don Davis, that all 
bills of the Association for the period beginning March 17, 
1964, and ending April 9, 1964, be approved. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned. 

ANNUAL MEETING MINUTES 

(Continued from Page One) 
James L. Cobb moved, seconded by John 
W. Trapp, th'^t Proposal VII, chaniging 
Tournament Rule III-D to provide that the 
site of the State Basketball Tournament be 
alternated annually between Louisville and 
Lexington, be tabled. The motion carried 
by a vote of 29-22. 

Roy T. Reasor moved, seconded by Tom 
John'-on, that Proposal VIII, providing that 
in the Delegate Assembly at the annual 
meeting a district shall remain not repre- 
sented if the duly elected deleg'^te or alter- 
nate does not answer the roll call, be adopt- 
ed. The motion was carried. 

Pete Grisrsby, Jr., moved, seconded by 
Edward Madden, that certain State Basket- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



Page Nine 



HIGHLANDS HIGH SCHOOL BOYS' SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS B CHAMPION— 1964 



#^ m m^ M 



.\'\ 



i 





(Left to Riahtl Front Row: Mike Rice. Ken Grimm. Tom Ader. Tom Grimm. Jim Jones. Mike Havlick. Denny Hunter, 
J-.'-n "o<is Tin- Raoke Se<-ond Row: Roger Motilman, Jim \ oy, Ted Bush, Steve Scharstein, Lee Bezold. David Wolf, 
Edd Kreiling, Claude Wilson. Barry Erb. Third Row: Bob Johnson, Seattle DeLong, Chip Hunter, Ben Hail, Jack Addams, 
Jeff Moffitt, Tim Fosdick, Tom Reik, Tom Bonnick, Coach S ig Lawson. 



ball Tournament recommendations and re- 
gional baseball tournament travel expense 
recommendations, made respectively by 
Prin. James V. Bolen of the Wayland Hig-h 
School and Prin. George L. Moore of the 
McDowell Hig'h School, be considered by the 
Delegate Assembly. The vote to consider 
the recommendations was 22-0. Commission- 
er Sanford pointed out that the recommen- 
dations presented by Mr. Grigsby did not 
fall in the category of proposals for chang- 
es in the Association's Constitution, By- 
Laws or Tournament rules. John Heber 
moved, seconded by F. P. Newberry, that 
the Board of Control be authorized to study 
the recommendations presented by Mr. 
Grilgsby, and to adopt any of them which 
appeared necessary or advisable. The mo- 
tion was carried. 

Joe Ohr moved, seconded by James A. 
Pickard, that the Delegate Assembly con- 
sider a proposal to allow, during the season, 
two basketball scrimmages between squads 



representing different K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools, these scrimmages not to count 
against the game limit mentioned in By- 
Law 21. The vote to consider this proposal 
was 26-23, but this was not the necessary 
two-thirds vote required for considering a 
proposal from the floor. 

There being no further business. Presi- 
dent Thornton declared the meeting ad- 
journed. 

The Dinner meeting of the Association 
was held in the Crystal Ballroom of the 
Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M. with 648 dele- 
gates and other school officials present. 
Recipient of the Game-Guy Award was 
Leaman Pipes of the Bourbon County High 
School. The presentation of the award was 
made by K.H.S.A.A. Director Don Davis. 

The address of the evening was given by 
Dr. William W. "Bill" Slider, Minister of 
Christ Methqldist Churcih, Louisviille. Dr. 
Slider's interesting and humorous address 
gave ample proof of the fact that he has at- 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



tained national recognition as an accomp- 
lished speaker. He issued a challenge to ad- 
ministrators and coaches present to take 
pride in the profession which they had chosen 
for their life's work, and he gave testimony 
on what athletics had done for him personal- 
ly. He had the finest collection of humorous 
stories, all driving home points which he 
was making, that many members of his 
audience had heard. Prolonged applause at 
the end of Dr. Slider's talk indicated that his 
efforts were well received. 

K. H. S. C<, A. 

Executive Board Meeting Minutes 

The Executive Board of the Kentucky Higih 
Sehool Coaches Association met at the Blue Boar 
Restaurant in Louisville at 4 o'clock, Wednesday 
April 8, 1964 with the following members present: 
Richard Greenwell, Past Presdient; Bob Wright, 
President; Charles Kuhn, Vice-President; James 
Bazzell, Sgt.-at-anns; Joe Ohr, Sec.-Treas.; Estill 
Branham, All-Star Manager. 

The Executive Board approved the reservation 
of seats for its members at the All-Star football 
and basketball games played each Aug-ust. 

The Executive Board approved the paying of 
travel expenses of its men bers to the All-Star 
games and to meetings called by the president. The 
mileage allowed is seven cents a mile. 

The Executive Meeting approved a dinner meet- 
ing on Saturday of its members at 1:30 at the Ken- 
tucky Hotel in Lexington during All- Star week. 

The Executive Board approved and recommend- 
ed the insurance policy issued to coaches by the 
Continental Casualty Company. 

The Executive Board, in a delayed meeting after 
the annual meeting, appointed Estill Branham All- 
Star games manager for 1965. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
vs^as adjourned at 5:50. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Joe Ohr, Sec.-Treas 

Annual Business Meeting 

The Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
met in annual session April 8, 1964, in Room 110 of 
the Convention Center in Louisville with Pres. 
Robert Wright (Ashland) presiding. Members of 
the executive board present were Richaixl Green- 
well (Shelbyville), retiring president; Charles Kuhn 
(Male), vice-president; Joe Ohr (Irvine), sec.-treas.; 
and James Bazzell (Allen County), Sgt-at-Arms. 
Approximately 100 members were present. 

Alvin Almond (College High) opened the meet- 
ing with the invocation. 

President Wright recognized members of the 
board of the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation who were present, they being Ty Holland, 
Ralph Dorsey and Morton Combs. 

The minutes of the Executive Board were dis- 
pensed with by motion of Estill Branham and sec- 
onded by Richard Greenwell. These minutes had 
been published in the ATHLETE. 

On a motion by Ralph Dorsey and seconded by 
Corky Cox the reading of the minutes were dis- 
pensed with as they were published in the ATH- 
LETE. 

Sec.-Treas. Joe Ohr gave a report of the financial 
standing of the Kentucky High School Coaches As- 
sociation and the All-Star funds. These reports were 



accepted bv motion of Corky Cox and seconded by 
Gil Sturtzel. 

Mr. Ty Holland, Murray High School and a 
member of the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation Board of Control, introduced to the coaches, 
Mr. Cal Luther, baskeitball coach of Murray State 
College. Luther was the Ohio Valley Conference 
"Coach of the Year" in 19n4. Luther chose the topic, 
"Why Are You In the Coaching Profession?", for 
his talk, which was well received by the group. 
Briefly Luther stated: "You have to say to your- 
self that you have an opportunity to be creative. 
You must be able to pass something on to someone 
else. We have a . tremendous challenge in coaching. 
We have the opportunity to mold individuals into 
good citizens. We, as coaches, get the student in a 
meaningful experience. We should set our standards 
high, motivate each student to the limit. The world 
is crying for the kind of person we can turn out. 
We can make a man out of a boy, temper his spirit, 
teach him cooperation. We do not have prejudices 
and intolerance in athletics. We accept a player as 
he is, not his color, his religion or how he spells 
his name. Sometimes in our greatest success, we 
are the greatest failure. Defeat does not mean dis- 
honor. Losses should spur man on. We should strive 
for perfection. Athletics is a means of teaching a 
boy what he has to contribute. If you want to find 
out about an individual, you can find out about him 
more quickly in competition." Luther concluded his 
remarks by stating that every coach should take a 
few minutes to give a prayer giving thanks for the 
opnortunity to work with young men in competitive 
athletics. 

Edd Kellow (Trinity) reported on the basketball 
clinic, sponsored by the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association, which is to be held in Louis- 
ville June 18, 19, and 20. This clinic is being held 
at the time of the Kentucky-Indiana basketball game. 
Member coaches of the K.H.S.C.A. mus.t pay a $5.00 
fee for the clinic, while non-members are required to 
pay a $10.00 fee. The fee includes a ticket to the 
Kentucky-Indiana game on Saturday night June 20. 
The Clinic will be held at the Kentucky Hotel. 

Charlie Kuhn (Male), president of the Louisville 
Coaches Association, announced the second annual 
clinic sponsored by the L. C. A. was to be held 
Friday night and Saturday with a dinner at $6.30 
at Trinity High School on the first night and other 
sessions to be held at DeSales High School. 

Two of Kentucky's outstanding coaches were 
recognized and presented trophies on being elected 
"Coach of the Year" by their fellow coaches in the 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association. Fred 
Clayton, Caldwell County, was chosen the football 
"Coach of the Year." His Caldwell Counity team won 
the AA Championship of 1963. Clayton was pre- 
sented to his fellow coaches by Charlie Kuhn, who 
acted in behalf of Ray Callahan who received this 
honor for 196'2. Callahan, an assitsant coach of the 
University of Kentucky, was unable to attend. Kuhn's 
Male High team won AAA honors for 1963. 

Gene Rhodes (Male High) was recognized as 
the 'Coach of the Year" in basketball for 1963-1964. 
Rhodes was presented by Morton Combs of Carr 
Creek who received this honor last year. 

In a rather heated and hotly contested election 
for sergeant-at-arms Fred Clayton was elected over 
George Sauer. 

As a result of this election a motion was made 
by Estill Branham and seconded by Paul Young that 
membership cards be presented at the door for next 
year's meeting. Motion passed. 

On motion by John Meihaus and seconded by 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 



Page Eleven 



Richard Greenwell as the secretary-treasirrer's po- 
sition was given Joe Ohr (Irvine) for 1965-1966. 

Some discussion arose relative to changing the 
expiration date of membership cards. However, the 
motion to change the date from March 1 to May 1 
was defeated. Sec. Joe Ohr was instructed to notify 
every principal concerning the listing of coaches on 
the list submitted to District Tourney Managers by 
Commissioner Sanford. 

Richard Greenwell, retiring president, was pre- 
sented a plaque for his past leadership. Ralph Dor- 
sey, former president of the Association made the 
presentaSion. 

Meeting adjourned at 9:40. 



K.M.I. WINS RIFLE CHAMPIONSHIP 



Reports of Audit 

Irvine, Kentucky 
March 25, 1964 
Executive Committee 

Kentuclty High School Coaclies Association 
LouisviJie, Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

I have examined the records of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association for the period March 13. 1963 thru 
February 29, 1964, as furnished to me by your secretary, Mr. 
Joe Ohr, Irvine, Kentucky. 

All transactions during the stated period are shown on the 
attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. Receipts 
have been traced into the bank and all disbursements have 
been substantiated by canceled checks. 

The balance of $8,071.69 has been confirmed as being on 
deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, Ken- 
tucky, on February 29, 1964. 

This schedule, in my opinion, properly reflects all receipts 
and disbursements for the period shown. 
Yours very truly, 
William Sexton, Jr.. Auditor 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCWOOL COACHES ASS'N 
STATEMENT OF PECFTPTS AND DISBURSE- 
MENTS FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 13, 1963 TO 
FEBi?UARY 29, 1964. 

Bank Balance on March 12, 1963 $ 8,088.61 

RECEIPTS: 

Membership Dues $ 1,386.00 

Grant from KHSAA ."iOO.OO 

Hartford Insurance Co. — medical 

expense reimbursement 8.75 

Total Receipts 1,894.7'; 

GRAND TOTAL $ 9,983.?S 

DISRURSEMENTS- 

Ralph Dorsey — telephone & postage 11.31 

E. R. Smith, P. M. — Postage 50.00 

Sexton Ins. Agency — Audit 15.00 

Sexton Ins. Aeency — Treas. Bond 31.25 

Secretary of State — Corp. fee 2.00 

Kentuckian Motel — All-Star 

Headquarters 81.46 

Joe Ohr — All-Star expenses 26.15 

Joe Ohr — Delegate expense KEA 25.00 

Joe Ohr — Collection fee 346.50 

The Estill Herald — printing 17.00 

Richard Greenwell — 

Exp. Football Ass'n -116.00 

Richard Greenwell — Expenses 1963 

Football Rules meeting -190.00 

Ed Ke'low — Advance 1964 

Basketball Clinic 1,000.00 

Total Disbursements 1,911.67 

BALANCE FEBRUARY 29. 1964 $ 8,071.69 

Balance in Union Bank & Trust Company, Irvine, 

Kentucky, per bank statement of Feb. 29. 1964 $ 8,071.6') 

Irvine. Kentucky 
March 25, 1954 
Executive Committee 

East— West All-Star Football & Basketball Games of 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen : 

Upon instructions from Mr. Joe Ohr, Irvine, Kentucky, I 
have made an examination of the records of the All-Star 
account f'lmished to me bv Mr. Ohr, and covering the 
period March 14, 1963, to February 24, 1964. 

All transactions for the stated period are shown on thf* 
attached schedule of receipts and disbursements. The bank 
balance of $28,887.58 has been confirmed as being on de- 
posit in the First Security National Bank & Trust Com- 
pany, Lexington, Kentucky. 




(Left to Right) Fr 
champion; James Bri 
Row: Scott Berdine, 



nt Row: Dan Breene of M.M.I., individual 
e and Arthur Chapman of K.M.I. Second 
lames Frederick, and John Ott, of K.M.I. 



Kentucky Military Institute took a narrow victory 
on April 25 in the Third Annual K.H.S.AA. State 
Rifle Marksmanship Tournament, held at the Univer- 
sity of Kenljucky's Barker HaJl firing range. The 
KJMJ. team score was 1,362 points to 1,358 for MJM.I. 
Louisville Male, winner the past two years, was 
third 'wdtih 1,352. Team and individual scores will be 
given in a subsequent issue of the ATHLETE. 

The cash receipts of $10,804.75 Iiave been traced into th<! 
bank and the total disbursements of $8,131.50 have been 
properly substantiated by canceled checks. 

There is on deposit in the Columbia Frederal Savings & 
Loan Association, Covington, Kentucky, in your account No. 
9315 the som of $4,372.30 as of March 12, 1964. This is 
verified by a letter under date of March 12, 1964, from 
Colnmbia Federal to Mr. Ohr. 

The receipts and disbursements shown in the attached 
schedule appear to be correct and, in my opinion, clearly 
reflect all the transactions for the period covered. 

Mr. Ohr maintains his records in excellent order. 
Respectfully submitted, 
William Sexton, Jr.. Anditor 

EAST— WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL AND 

BASKETBALL GAMES OF THE 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES 

ASSOCIATION 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 

THE PERIOD MARCH 14. 1963 TO FEBRUARY 24, 1964 

Balance on deposit in First Security National Bank 

& Trust Company, Lexington, Kentucky, on March 

13, 1963 $26,214,33 

RECEIPTS: 

Receipts from All-Star Games 10,804.75 

GRAND TOTAL $37,019.08 

DISRURSFMEiVTS: 

Change for All-Star Games $__ 800.00 

Coaches Salaries 1,000.00 

Awards to Players 590.10 

Awards to Coaches 94.62 

Federal Taxes 221.60 

Kentucky Taxes -321.52 

Medical Expenses — Players 148.83 

Fstill Branham — Misc. Expenses 144.30 

Travel Expenses Players 804.82 

Printing 66.87 

Photographs 70.80 



Page Twelve THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOO L ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1964 

insaran'e ^*'"'' liz'lo Ruling: There is no penalty, assuming the hurler 

pl^^f^'ystcmset-apIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 25!30 makes an honest attempt to go over the hurdle and 

200 Pass tickets 4.90 does not drag one leg outside it. There is no ad- 

?t'""1 .7" '^''■?,' .L'.oyd McDermott 100.00 vantage gained from knocking down a hurdle. A rec- 

U. of Ky. — Salaries to personnel 354.91 j°u tjj j j.ii 

u. of Ky. — Meals for Ali-Stars..__ 2.639.13 °™ "^y '"^ accepted and approved even though some 

of the hurdles (have been knocked down during the 

Total Disbarsements 8.131.30 race, it being understood the hurdles meet the track 

Balance on February 24, 1964 _J28,887.58 Tules Overturning specifications. If they do not, the 

'- record will be denied even though the performance 

Balance on deposit in First Security National Bank doeS count in the meet points. 
& Trust Company. Lexington, Kentucky, per bank 

statement of February 24, 1964 -m.8Si.i» 7, Situation: Because of competing in other events, 

or for some other reason, Al passes all his turns at 

a given heigiht. After all other contestants have fail- 

1964 TrCIck ^DllSStionS ^ *'° dear the heig'hlt, Al requests permission to 

Editor's Note: These interpretations of the Na- Ruling: His request should be denied. The bar 
tional Alliance Track and Field Rules do not set should be raised, after which Al is entitled to any 
aside nor modify any nde. The rulings are made by remaining turns due him. 
the National Federation of State High School Ath- 
letic Associations in response to situations presented. 8. 'Situation: Should 'the timer use his thumb or 

index finger in operating a stop watch for the timing 

1. Situation: When applying the "Olympic method" of track events? 
of breaking ties in field events (Rule 5, Section 2, 

pages 14-il'5, 1964 Track and Field Rules and Record Ruling: The use of the index finger is recommend- 

Book) are the points equally divided or distributed on , _, . , „. . ,, j , j. j 

the basis of placing after the ties are broken? ^- ^he mdex finger is generally conceded to respond 

I more quickly than any other part when voluntary 

Ruling: Application of the "Olympic method" eli- muscles are involved, 

minates the tie even though two or more boys cleared o i-.-j. i.- t-. • j. • j i. 

the same final height. There is a winner, a second- ^ ^- Situation: Does an inspector or a judge have 

place winner, etc. Points are awarded on the basis ^^ authority to disqualify a runner? 

of placing, that is for the winner, for second-place, Ruling: No Inspectors and judges shall report di- 
etc. 

redtly to the referee any infraction or irregularity 

2. Situation: Runner Al is leading the race, but during a race. When an inspector observes an in- 
loses his balance as he nears the finish line and rolls fmction or irregularity such as crowding or running 
under the finish line yam without breaking it. He on or over the left line of an adjacent runner's lane, 
goes across the finish line first. or the committing of an infraction during the hurdle 

Ruling: Al is declared the wimier provided his °^ """^Y T%Kffl^ ''^^'i ^J "^^'J^+f ^ """^ ^^^ 

torso crossed the finish line first. Any competitor 9^"'^ \'^ ^'^'^: ^^ *^ completion of the race, the 

who crawls or rolls across the finish line, ht^ever, '"^pector must immediately report the infraction to 

is not considered to have completed the race until *^« '^'^"'^^ ^^° *'" "^^^^ ^^^ necessary decision, 

his entire body has crossed the finish line. iq. Situation: What is the length of the baton- 

3. Situaition: Al places his pole in the planHng pit, Passing zone? 

but he does not leave the ground and no part of his Ruling: It is 22 yards, 
body passes under the crossbar or beyond the stop- 
board. 11. Situation: Runner Al is in the pole lane and 

rimner is in lane 2. Spectators in the field crowd 

Ruling: There has been no -trial. into the pole lane. To avoid being tripped by spec- 

4. -Situation: Al, Bl, CI and Dl are tihe only tators,Al moves over the lane line and there is con- 
entries in the pole vault in a meet in which ioZ ^^ T*^ ^^^ ^\^^ ^ii\s 'the race and Al places 
places are to be counted. Al fails to clear the fir^t sf^nd. Inspector rules conditions pennitted Al no 
height in three legal attempts. The other three aie S^°"=.^ '^^^^ to move into lane 2 to avoid spectators, 
successful at the fir^t height. Is Al credited with ^* ''''"''°" '^ protested. 

fourth place. Ruling: In circumstances where conditions are not 

Ruling: Al is not given a place. " accordance with the rules i.e. where spectators 

" 1^ are allowed to enter the field and encroach on the 

5. iSituation: In the low hurdle race, competitor track area, the inspector must use his best judgment 
Al is in lane 1, Bl is in lane 2 and A2 is in lane 3. '" making a recommendation to the referee relative 
Al strikes the eighth hurdle, loses his balance and to whether a competitor should be disqualified. The 
stumbles across lane 2 and into lane 3. He does not referee must weigh all the factors when considering 
interfere vidth Bl and continues in lane 3, clearing the recommendation. If the referee, after due con- 
the ninth and tenth hurdles in that lane and finish- sideration, decides the act of Al did not warrant 
mg first. disqualification, he will not disqualify Al. 

Ruling: Al is disqualified. He is expected to clear 12. Situation: Al puts the shot which falls on or 

(or attempt to clear) all of the hurdles in his own ^ -j j j. ^.u v -l.- -l. 1 it, i.i. 

Jane i^ o » 10 «• u outside of one of the lines which marks the throwing 

sector. 

6. Situation: Is there a penalty for knocking over 

a hurdle? Will a record be accepted if one or more Ruling: This is an illegal put and it counts as a 

of the hurdles is knocked over? trial. 



ANNOUNCING OUR FOOTBALL 
COVERAGE FOR 1964-65 

$ 500.00 Basic Accident Medical Expense 
$L750.00 Overall Maximum Benefit 
$L000.00 Accidental Death Benefit 
$L000J0 Maximum Dismemberment Schedule 

Ottered In Conjunction With An 
Excellent Student Accident Policy 

$3,000.00 Basic Accident Medical Expense 

$8,000.00 Overall Maximum Benefit 

$2,000 Accidental Death Benefit 

$8,000.00 Maximum Dismemberment Schedule 

PROMPT CLAIM SERVICE 

WE INVITE YOUR INQUIRIES. 

*7<4e Kinx^en, Qo^nfLOiUf, general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREAEY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life D«iMitmait 

121-123 LAFAYETTE AVENUE LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 255-0885 

P.O. BOX 7116 



Order Your Football Equipment Now 
For Early August Delivery 



PLACE YOUR ORDERS AT ONCE 

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equipment, as well as basketball equipment. Shipment will be made at the 
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ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT flFX>R YOUR SUMMER 
PLAYGROUND PROGRAMS 

If you plan to have baseball in connection with your recreation pro- 
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HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

We SHiP-TTie DaV You BuV" 



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